The Wishing Game and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.21
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wishing Game Paperback – 6 Oct 2003


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 6 Oct 2003
£19.20 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; New edition edition (6 Oct. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743461444
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743461443
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 3.2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,019,796 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

There are particular ironies involved in knowing that a story is going to end in misery and having to watch the detailed working out. We know from the beginning that terrible things happened at Kirkston Abbey, a 1950s public school, things so terrible that they gave a bishop a nervous breakdown--but by the time they actually happen we have learned to care about the people they happen to. As the narrator explains, it all begins with an act of kindness--aloof Rokeby helps sensitive Palmer with his Latin translation; two loners find a friendship that gets them through the bullying of boys and teachers. Those to whom evil is done, however, do evil in return, particularly once they get hold of a Ouija board, and what starts as resistance to oppression becomes a nightmare of vindictiveness and arbitrary destruction. Redmond has a real sense of the claustrophobic--the school is a Bad Place and the decade in which it exists is another--and is good on the social dynamics of scapegoating and bullying. This is an impressive first novel partly because it trades so successfully in ambiguities and partly because it is so painful. This is a novel about corruption, and a terrifying one. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

Redmond's teenage characters are well drawn, and the small universe of the school becomes a real emotional landscape, where the pupils are credited with passionate and complex emotion (Independent on Sunday)

The setting is genuinely chilling, and the atmosphere of menace and sterility riveting; (Daily Express)

Well-crafted and thought-provoking . . . Redmond shows himself to be a scrupulously fair writer who refuses to stereotype his characters and views human behaviour with a high degree of compassion (Financial Times)

Well-paced and suspenseful (Gay Times)

This impressive first novel powerfully evokes the terrible effects of cruelty and bullying, whether by an adult or another child, and the unravelling nightmare is sustained with suspense and pace (Sunday Mirror)

Such is the hard-edged skill of Redmond's writing that the carefully structured revelations about the past have a bitter and compelling power (TLS)

Patrick Redmond's chilling debut novel is a first-rate page-turner (Daily Mirror)

The setting is genuinely chilling, and the atmosphere of menace and sterility riveting (Daily Express)

Redmond's teenage characters are well-drawn, and the small universe of the school becomes a real emotional landscape, where the pupils are credited with passionate and complex emotion (Independent on Sunday) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Sept. 1999
Format: Paperback
Like most of the readers on this page, I found "The Wishing Game" 'unputdownable'- the plot is gripping. I loved the way Richard is initially an admirable character but then turns into a monster. Like one of the readers, I too found the block capitals bits very irritating, and far too close to Internet 'shouting' than the late 50's atmosphere could have benefited from. Also, I did ask myself whether a 14-year old of the time would have sworn so much. All in all, though, I was totally gripped by the story, and couldn't wait to get to the end. When I did, however, I was quite disappointed by the lack of insight on what actually happened on the night of the seance. Whilst the author probably wanted to enshroud the episode in mistery, the result was a very unclear and unsatisfactory explanation - a real anticlimax. Had Redmond dared delving more into the occultist side of the story (a very risky thing to do), then maybe the ending could have been plausible. But it just wasn't. Anyway, I don't want to spoil it for those who haven't read it yet - go for it, it's a damn good book anyway.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nicola F (Nic) TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
This novel was skilfully written and I enjoyed it for the most part, though I did find it disintegrated somewhat towards the end and overall the final chapter left me feeling a little bit disappointed. I think the main issue is that this book is not quite sure what it wants to be: thriller or mystery or a little bit of psychological horror- and as a result some of the plot line is a little bit tangled and veers off somewhat.

The book is set in the 1950's in an all boy's boarding school. It showcases the impact that adolescent manipulations and bullying can have on its victims and is certainly dark in tone, combining these threads with a bit of the occult and the notion of whether a fifteen year old boy can really be a psychopath. The two main characters, Jonathan and Richard, strike up an unexpected but very damaging friendship which impacts drastically on the lives of those around them.

The story has sinister aspects and is a lot more intense than I was expecting, though I enjoyed these parts of the plot the most, particularly as the story has several arcs running through it for different characters within the school which all combine towards the end of the book culminating in a very disturbing scenario.

What I didn't enjoy so much was that some of the story wasn't fully explained in great detail- particularly at the end- I would have liked the idea of the `Wishing Game' itself to be divulged a little bit more and I did feel that as no explanation was particularly forthcoming that this was a bit of a shame. I really wanted to know fully what had been undertaken in the room with Richard, Jonathan and Nicholas, but no answer ever came, though I suppose it does let the reader reach their own conclusions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. K. Smith on 7 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
I absolutely couldn't put this book down. I thought Patrick Redmond's portrayal of the characters was fabulously credible, particularly the development of the friendship between Jonathan and Richard. He managed also to bring out sympathy for the unsavoury and downright wicked characters, by depicting the events in their lives which had made them that way. I thought this was psychological expertise in a most readable format. My only criticism is that the author did not need to resort to the supernatural to make this story a success - as this, for me, ruined the credibility towards the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Bluecashmere. TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As in the football cliché, this is very much a book of two halves. The first half establishes the setting for the novel and its key characters in a tone which is almost naïve – an outsider’s experience of the often harsh reality of a boys’ public school in a post war rural setting. Here it would have been easy for Redmond to fall back on familiar generalisations. Instead, via accumulating precise particularities he creates an entirely authentic world, peopled by a range of convincing characters, both boys and staff, again seen through the eyes of the young grammar school transfer Jonathan Palmer. If some of the characters seem familiar, they are the natural products of a uniform world which moulded individuals to its culture.

The seeds of the more gothic elements to feature so strongly later are also sown here through the compelling, self-assured social isolate, Richard Rokeby. At first we see this crucial character from the outside, so that we are presented only with the surface composure, the aura which keeps others at a distance and often intimidates. As Jonathan is prised away from his friends, though at least as much magnetically drawn to Rokeby, gradually we are drawn into the inner reality of this strangely fascinating individual.

Interspersed with the story of Jonathon’s experiences are various snippets suggesting that as with the enigmatic Rokeby, other’s lives might not be as entrenched and stable as appears on the outside. Rokesby is both agent and catalyst, opening cracks into chasms as the novel works its way towards its dramatic conclusions.

The shift from a meticulous recording of half-familiar reality to melodrama and mayhem is, I suspect, a problem for some readers.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback