Winter Vault and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 1.77

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Winter Vault on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Winter Vault [Paperback]

Anne Michaels
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
RRP: 7.99
Price: 6.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
You Save: 1.16 (15%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 23 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Book Description

3 May 2010
Egypt, 1964. The great temple at Abu Simbel must be dismantled and resurrected high above the rising waters of the Aswan Dam. This daunting task is overseen by Avery, a young engineer who, at the same time, is carefully building a life with his new wife, Jean. But not everything can be saved once the floodgates have opened: villages will be deluged, thousands will be exiled from their homes, and graves will be moved. And when Avery and Jean suffer a terrible loss of their own, they begin their separate journeys through the landscape of grief. Weaving historical moments with the quiet intimacy of human lives, "The Winter Vault" is the story of a husband and a wife trying to find their way back to each other; of people and nations displaced; and of the myriad means by which we all seek out a place to call home.

Frequently Bought Together

The Winter Vault + Fugitive Pieces
Buy the selected items together
  • Fugitive Pieces 6.29


Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (3 May 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408801086
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408801086
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 13.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 227,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Anne Michaels is the author of three collections of poetry: The Weight of Oranges, which won the Commonwealth Prize for the Americas; Miner's Pond, which won the Canadian Authors Association Award and was shortlisted for the Governor General's Award and the Trillium Award; and Skin Divers. Her first novel, Fugitive Pieces, was published by Bloomsbury in 1997 to worldwide critical acclaim. It won the Orange Prize and the Guardian First Book Award among others, and was shortlisted for the Giller Prize and the Canadian Booksellers Association Author of the Year Award. It was also made into a major motion picture. Anne Michaels has also composed music for the theatre.

Born in 1958, Anne Michaels lives in Toronto.

(Photo credit: David Laurence)

Product Description

Review

'Writing of dangerously beautiful intensity ... magnificent' Sunday Telegraph 'Michaels is a novelist of unusual and compelling power' The Times 'A rich, full book, written with the lyricism... a bigger, bolder, more confident version of her earlier work' Guardian 'Read this book like poetry, or rather hear it like music ... Anne Michaels guides us to the top of some extraordinary peaks of feeling and perception' Independent

About the Author

Anne Michaels is the author of three collections of poetry: The Weight of Oranges, which won the Commonwealth Prize for the Americas; Miner's Pond, which won the Canadian Authors Association Award and was shortlisted for the Governor General's Award and the Trillium Award; and Skin Divers. Her first novel, Fugitive Pieces, was published by Bloomsbury in 1997 to worldwide critical acclaim. It won the Orange Prize and the Guardian First Book Award among others, and was shortlisted for the Giller Prize and the Canadian Booksellers Association Author of the Year Award. It was also made into a major motion picture. Anne Michaels has also composed music for the theatre. Born in 1958, Anne Michaels lives in Toronto.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
36 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Crying out for the editor's pen 18 May 2009
By A Common Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
Back in the late 1990s, I had been greatly impressed with Anne Michaels first book, the Orange Prize-winning Fugitive Pieces and it had been a long wait for her next novel, The Winter Vault.

The book is primarily about a young couple who move to Egypt where the husband, Avery, is working as an engineer on the project to move the great statue of Abu Simbel before it is overwhelmed by the rising waters of the Aswan Dam. Avery's wife Jean, who has an interest in botany spends her time learning about the country and collects local plants to transplant to a safer location.

Unfortunately, I found the book to be a five day slog through cloying prose, which at times made me think of a teenage diary, with entries full of carefully-crafted sentences milking every conversation of its last shade of meaning. Does any married couple really speak with such pretentious profundity as this:

"You're like a man seen from a distance, a man who we think has stopped to tie his shoelaces but who is really kneeling in prayer".
"Our shoelaces have to come undone, said Avery, before we ever think to kneel"

Earlier, Avery has lain next to Jean his wife, thinking that, "only love teaches a man his death, that it is in the solitude of love that we learn to drown". But its not just the conversations which exhibit this over-written portentousness; the thoughts of the characters too are so precious as to be almost a parody, such as this, "Jean felt the blow, the disaster to a soul that can be caused by beauty, by an answer one cannot grasp with one's hands".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Eleven years after the publication of Fugitive Pieces, her only other novel, Anne Michaels has published a monumental philosophical novel which is also exciting to read for its characters and their conflicts. Complex and fully integrated themes form the superstructure of the novel in which seemingly ordinary people deal with issues of life and death, love and death, the primacy of memory, the search for spiritual solace, and man's relationships with the earth and the water that makes the earth habitable--huge themes and huge scope, reflecting huge literary goals. And Michaels is successful, not just in dealing with the big issues and themes affecting mankind itself, but in bringing them to life through individuals who muddle along, seeking some level of personal connection with the world while trying to appreciate life's mysteries.

Avery Escher is a young engineer in 1964 when he and his wife Jean travel to Abu Simbel, where he is charged with the task of helping to remove the Great Temple and reconstruct it in the cliff sixty feet higher. Gushing water, which will be released when the Aswan Dam is finished, will flood the area where the temple lies, and the new Lake Nasser will cover all the land downstream. As he works on the site, Avery feels that "Holiness was escaping under the [workers'] drills," and he comes to believe that "the reconstruction was a further desecration, as false as redemption without repentance."

All the Nubian people who have lived in the area below the dam for tens of generations have been relocated, but they are bereft of their roots, their memories, and their dead. This is not the first time Avery has been exposed to the dislocation of long-time residents. His father, William Escher, was an engineer working to build the St.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The Winter Vault

In this beautifully written and touching novel Anne Michaels writes about a subject we all are familiar with and likely to have suffered. In terms of loss of place she describes the evocative Nubian territory that was flooded to make the Nasser Lake and Aswan Dam. Progress is invariably a duality and in this case the dark side was the displacement of many thousands of Nubian people to Northern Sudan.
Her style of writing, particularly in the first part of the novel flows like a poem might and captivates the reader completely. Rather than focussing upon the peoples that were displaced she concentrates on the administrator who oversaw the displacement, a likeable character. The two lead characters are Jean and Avery, a Canadian-English partnersip of love and dedication. Jean is a botanist who along with Avery compares the loss and displacement in Egypt to the construction of the St Lawrence Seaway and the loss that occurred to the local inhabitants. Avery is involved with the enormous task of moving ancient Egyptian monoliths to a safer place form the coming waters. This parallel also emphasises the duality of progress very clearly.
In a dramatic shift towards personal loss Michaels follows Jean's tragic pregnancy and the emotional consequences which also shifts the emotional climate to a cold, hard place where she makes an intersting discovery.
The experience of reading Anne Michaels novel is one of learning in many directions of the compass, it is a great read.
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read
It is up to her unique standard so I hope she writes some more. Her descriptive writing is as reviewd on the book's cover - excellent.
Published 7 months ago by Trish. NIBLOCK
3.0 out of 5 stars Nothing to hold on to
Some beautifully written sentences. As a whole the book fails to interest due to poorly drawn characters and lack of a real plot. Very wordy and pointlessly so. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Ley
5.0 out of 5 stars beautiful
Don't read whatever I might consider writing. Read this book. Then read Fugitive pieces. Then source Anne's poetry compilations. Then urge Anne to write more. And quickly.
Published 15 months ago by L. J. P
1.0 out of 5 stars Very hard going
I never like to give up on a book, and very rarely do, but have got only about a quarter of the way through and feel like I'm being hit over the head with historical and technical... Read more
Published 16 months ago by Dr. Pauline Rose
5.0 out of 5 stars Intense and heart-rending.
Anne Michaels writes with energy and intensity. The style is very engaging with its careful use of language, intelligent reflection and pace. Read more
Published 21 months ago by Glynis Thomson
4.0 out of 5 stars A good interesting read
I enjoyed this book. Lots on interesting ideas and I learned some useful information. My only problem was that at times the narrative lapsed into lists
Published 23 months ago by solrelax
5.0 out of 5 stars winter vault
Brilliant book should be read by all engineers doing major projects so that they understand the human impact o these projects. Great for archaeologists
Published on 23 Feb 2012 by Richard
3.0 out of 5 stars The Winter Vault
This novel was clearly written with the best of intentions. But it misses the goal by a mile. It is a very frustrating mix of unforgettable gems of acute truths and self-indulgent... Read more
Published on 20 Feb 2011 by pasacallia
2.0 out of 5 stars Heavy-going
I always thought I was the only person in the world who didn't like *Fugitive Pieces* (which I've now well forgotten), so I wasn't surprised to find I didn't much like this (and I... Read more
Published on 5 Dec 2010 by millicentlyd
1.0 out of 5 stars The Winter Vault by Anne Michaels
Although there was lots of imagery, and well written; I felt it was very disjointed; in fact I almost lost the will to live reading this book. Read more
Published on 7 Aug 2010 by Avid Reader
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
uplifting books for intelligent ladies? 0 5 May 2009
See all discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback