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The Winds of Dune Hardcover – 3 Sep 2009


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The Winds of Dune + Paul of Dune (Legends of Dune)
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd (3 Sep 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847377246
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847377241
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 3.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,242,378 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Kevin J. Anderson has over 20 million books in print in 30 languages worldwide. He is the author of, among others, the X-FILES novels, GROUND ZERO and the JEDI ACADEMY trilogy of STAR WARS novels - the three bestselling SF novels of 1994. He has also co-written the international bestselling prequels to Frank Herbert's monumental DUNE series. He has won, or been nominated for, many awards including the Nebula Award and the Bram Stoker Award. Visit his website www.wordfire.com The son of Frank Herbert (1920-86), Brian Herbert is a bestselling SF author in his own right. He has also written Dreamer of Dune, a comprehensive, Hugo Award-nominated biography of Frank Herbert.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 64 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Aug 2009
Format: Paperback
Apparently Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson aren't finished milking Frank Herbert's cash cow. First prequels, then sequels, and now a midquel.

In this case, "The Winds of Dune" explores the months after the blinded, grief-stricken Paul Atreides aka Muad'Dib wandered off into the desert. While Anderson and Herbert conjure some touching moments as the people in Paul's life deal with his loss, they don't manage to make the story come alive -- the prose and beloved characters are flat.

On Caladan, Jessica is shocked by the news of her son's apparent death, Chani's tragic loss, and the birth of her twin grandchildren. She rushes to Arrakis to assist Alia, now appointed Regent, and discovers that Dune has changed in many ways -- Paul's loss has only increased fanatical devotion (and equally fanatical division), and the ruthless Alia is determined to cement Paul's legacy.

Cue a novella-sized flashback about Paul's childhood, and how he and his friend Bronso of Ix ran away to join the circus... er, the Facedancer Jongleurs. No, seriously.

Unfortunately, Bronso of Ix has since become a sort of idealistic terrorist, disrupting Paul's "funeral" and spreading heretical pamphlets which seek to reveal Paul's flaws and atrocities. Jessica attempts to soften Alia's increasingly ruthless reign as her daughter prepares to marry Duncan Idaho -- but Bronso's determination to kill the legend of Muad'Dib leads to some very big new problems. But is all this Muad'Dib's will?

"The Winds of Dune" is one of those novels that might have been a decent sci-fi read if it had been based on its own universe.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. P. S. Pennycook on 21 Sep 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book has two timelines: one is immediately after the events of Dune Messiah, Jessica tells Princess Irulan about Paul's adolesence before the events of Dune so Irulan can update her biography of Paul. Three years before Dune, Paul ran away with Bronso Vernius (Ixian heir)to join a circus with Face Dancer performers, and learns how to control crowds. Between Dune and Dune Messiah, Paul employs Bronso to spread propaganda against his jihad.
The post-Dune Messiah parts are tedious, with none of the characters speaking or behaving like they did in the original Dune Trilogy. The flashbacks are written in the style of a 60s juvenile adventure romp. The Bene Gesserit seem blissfully unaware that Paul is the Kwisatz Haderach born a generation too early and think he and his mother very unimportant despite knowing his breeding.
The invention of Bene Gesserit guilt-casters, who induce catatonic guilt using Voice, is irrelevant. The introduction of Bronso as someone to speak against the Jihad is irrelevant. Both clearly achieved nothing, since their roles are not discussed in any Frank Herbert book, not even in any of the modern spin-offs.
As for needing to join a circus to learn crowd control (which is actually glossed-over very quickly), surely he had been taught the use of Voice by his mother, and in the early days his mother would have been aware of and exploited the legend that the Missionaria Protectiva created among the Fremen.
I find the book difficult to read with its stunted characters and lack of adult storyline. It feels like a short story or at best a novella, written for the juvenile market, stretched too far. Many sentences and ideas are repeated, using different words, a number of times over only a couple of pages, making it easy to skip paragraphs or even whole pages.
All I want from the Dune Universe is a decent sequel to the second trilogy, one which actually involves careful reading of the final chapter of Chapterhouse Dune.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Evered on 25 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
I've not been a huge fan of the new editions but I initially thought that this was probably the best of them. I did have a nagging feeling that there was something wrong with the section where Paul runs away with Bronso but I couldn't put my finger on it.

The only way I could get over this was to read the original again and low and behold on page 60 (I think) it clearly states that Paul had never been offworld before. That's it. Completley blown it. I can't read any of them anymore as I am convinced that he'd been on a Highliner in another preqel as well.

If they can't get something as fundemental as this right then why bother.

It might have gota 3 star if I hadn't noticed this.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A. Cox on 1 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Anyone expecting even a flash of Frank Herberts brilliance from this book will be sadly dissapointed.

Boring, badly plotted, and two dimensional. Cheesey dialogue and cardboard characters endlessly repeating the same thing. I have been more entertained by the back of a packet of Cornflakes.

Everyone associated with this pile of worm spawn should go and sit in a dark room with a copy of Chapterhouse until they learn to write.

Enough is enough, sorry Brian but your dads legacy is worth so much more than this twaddle. Go and do something original and leave Dune alone.

If you are a Dune fan then steer clear, its dreadful!

Im off to re - read the original just to remind myself what a genius Frank Herbert was.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By D McC on 19 Nov 2010
Format: Paperback
I am a big fan of the Dune series of books. The originals written by Frank Herbert in his very distinct style are some of the best examples of good science fiction I have ever read. While some of them can be a bit dry or overly philosophical in their content, they are still entertaining and thought provoking reads that leave you thinking long after you have set them down.

Given this I was naturally excited when I heard that Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson had chanced upon some previously undiscovered notes of Frank Herbert's, and were going to use this material to finish the story that was left hanging at the end of Chapterhouse: Dune. However, before I could find out how the epic was to end I had to endure three direct prequels and three distant prequels. And to be honest, I found them OK to read. I admired how neither of the authors attempted to replicate the writing style of Frank Herbert, as to do so could have easily looked like cheap mimicry, and I was interested in exploring a bit more of the Dune universe as it stood before the events of Dune and thereafter, and I was of course very interested to find out how the strange and unique setting had arisen out of the ashes of an ancient and long ago war. I was aware that the books were much more...accessible (you could read 'simple') and had distinct traces of trash sci-fi universes filled with shootey lasers and planet killing robots or whatever passes for entertainment among the ADD sufferers who are responsible for giving Stargate enough ratings to literally go on forever, but I didnt really mind.
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