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The Wind Singer (The Wind on Fire Trilogy) Paperback – 5 Mar 2012


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The Wind Singer (The Wind on Fire Trilogy) + Firesong (The Wind on Fire Trilogy) + Slaves of the Mastery (The Wind on Fire Trilogy)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Egmont; paperback / softback edition (5 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405239697
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405239691
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,036 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

William Nicholson was born in 1948 and received his early education at Downside School, a Roman Catholic monastic school, set in the countryside near Bath.

He went on to study English Literature at Christ's College, Cambridge, graduating with a double First Class degree in 1970. After leaving university, William joined BBC television, where he worked as a documentary film maker. It was not long before William's talent was channelled into writing for television dramas and his professional writing career took off.

William is perhaps best known as an acclaimed Hollywood screenwriter, whose work includes Elizabeth: The Golden Age, the Bafta award-winning Shadowlands, and Oscar-winning Gladiator.

He has written several screenplays for films due for future release, including Long Walk to Freedom, an adaptation of Nelson Mandela's autobiography.

Nicholson's first trilogy for young readers, The Wind on Fire, met with universal acclaim. Winner of the Smarties Gold Award and the Blue Peter Book Award. Nicholson's latest trilogy the Noble Warriors has also been enthusiastically received. The final book Noman is published on 4th September 2007:

'The events rip along, but the real strength of Nicholson's novel lies in its wonderful characters: Morning Star, drowning in the power of her love for Wildman, and Echo Kittle, captured by the enemy of Orlans' Daily Telegraph

His latest book, the highly anticipated Rich and Mad is a compelling and beautifully written novel about first love, first sex, and everything in-between.

Nicholson has been cited as one of the most gifted and imaginative writers alive in the world today. His adult titles include The Trial of True Love and The Society of Others.

William lives in Sussex with his wife Virginia, and their three children.

Product Description

Review

"* On The Wind Singer the Guardian said: 'Full of inventiveness, action and passion'; the Daily Telegraph said: 'In terms of imagination and sheer scale, it's as ambitious as books get.'; The Sunday Times said: 'An accessible, rebellious and fast-paced adventure.' * Noman, book 3 of The Noble Warriors trilogy, published in September 2007. The Noble Warriors has received huge acclaim. On Jango the Guardian said: 'A thrilling story of integrity.' On Seeker the Daily Telegraph said 'An engrossing and thoughtful adventure.'"

About the Author

William Nicholson William Nicholson is one of the most talented and in demand writers in the world. He has won awards and critical acclaim across the silver screen, stage and printed book. As a Hollywood screenwriter he has written the screenplays for the Oscar-winning Gladiator and the BAFTA-winner Shadowlands, and his books for children have won him both the Smarties Gold Award and Blue Peter Book Award William was born in 1948 and received his early education at Downside School, a Roman Catholic monastic school, set in the countryside near Bath. He went on to study English Literature at Christ's College, Cambridge, graduating with a double First Class degree in 1970. After leaving university, William joined BBC television, where he worked as a documentary film maker. It was not long before William's talent was channelled into writing for television dramas. In addition to his hugely successful Wind on Fire trilogy, his books for children and his books for teenagers include the Noble Warriors series and Rich and Mad. William lives in Sussex with his wife Virginia.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James Steerpike on 23 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback
The Wind Singer is a very entertaining children’s book with some great characters and which diverts from the typical “parentless” child hero by placing a whole family in the spotlight. Nicholson builds up his dystopian world really well and the description is handled with all the elegance necessary to appeal to both adult and child readers. However, the key problem I found as an adult reader was that the plot is almost entirely steered through coincidence. The protagonists are never really in control with what is happening around them. Just when things get bad, a ship will come along and save them, or a drunken man, or a wolf, or a rain of fireballs (seriously). This took away a lot of the tension for me as well as the whole allusion of suspended disbelief. So, ultimately, I was a little disappointed. I still think its worth reading, the ending was good, although things are rounded off a little quickly, but there are some good characters and the chapters which focus on the children’s father are particularly strong. Overall, I think this is a great book for kids (which is the intended audience after all) but some adult readers might be a little disenchanted, which is a shame since just a little touching-up on these plot holes could have made this into a great novel for all ages. In my opinion, Phillip Reeve’s Predator Cities trilogy succeeded better in this respect. I do have to admit, however, that I am solely basing this review on the first book of the series; I haven’t read any of the follow-ups to the Wind Singer.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Sir Furboy on 18 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback
Kestrel Hath and her Brother, Bowman, are twins in the city of Aramanth in a wonderfully imagined world full of magic and surprises. But their world is not the perfect place it once was, for the Wind Singer that overlooks their city has been broken for many years, and in the mean time the city has been overtaken by a rigidly enforced regime that ensures everyone is put to work in the place best suited to their skills and effort.

From the age of 2, children are educated and examined repeatedly, and their scores are added to the scores of their parents who also undertake regular examinations. The scores then calculate their priveleges, where they may live and what colour clothing they may wear.

But the Hath family think differently to other people, and they see that the system - rather than achieving a wonderful egalitarian society - actually binds them and imprisons them. And when Kestrel one day snaps in a school lesson, she awakes a chain of events that bring down the wrath of the chief examiner and set in motion something much larger and more dangerous than anyone would have believed possible.

I first looked at this book when it was newly published. I picked it up to buy it, but it was on one of those "3 for 2" displays where you can get 3 books for the price of two. As I could not find 3 books I wanted I resented paying full price for it and put it back! (Waterstones take note - you would sell me more books just by discounting them a little instead!)

It is a pity it took me so long to actually buy this book, because it is excellent. I was expecting a good fantasy story, but the story I read exceeded my expectations on two counts:

1) The characterisations were very well done, and often very amusing.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M on 5 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback
I just wandered into a sort of storeroom in my house the other day, I had completely forgotten about this book, suddenly I saw the series sitting there and the cover just crippled me with nostalgia. I remember reading this some time after Dido's first album (my mum used to play it in the car as I was reading it) so I must have been nine or ten years old. To be honest I can only remember the odd moment, I seem to remember some scene on a cliff or something similar, almost as though the book has woven itself into my actual childhood memories. However what I do remember is the effect this book had on me and it was profound. Perhaps it was simply because I was younger but I think it was probably a little more than that. The themes - oppression, heroism of the young etc. in some way must have defined the art I still enjoy today. I gave up reading for a while during early adolescence and it wasn't until I picked up 1984 that I started reading again; I can't help but feel this was some sort of regression or at least homage to this series. You know I was part of the Harry Potter generation but its not those books I dream of with fond memories (and still a little 'I wish I lived in this book') it is The Mortal Engines Quartet, His Dark Materials and this Wind on Fire Trilogy. It is this set which brings back the most powerful memories for every single book. I would strongly recommend this to any preadolescent child, if I can be proud of who I am then I owe something to this series.
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Format: Paperback
The Wind Singer was my first ever taste of Dystopia, and possibly YA as well. I've never forgotten it and ever since I've been addicted to Dystopian novels. As it's been a good ten years since I last read it, I wasn't sure what to expect, as other books I loved as a kid didn't seem so good after a second reading. I remembered very little of the plot too - past the colour system and Pinpin's first test, I couldn't remember much of the story.

Thankfully, I thought The Wind Singer was pretty awesome Fantasy/Dystopia, with a very prominent fantasy feel. The world outside the Dystopian city is not Dystopian but there's definitely fantasy elements. It's aimed more towards Middle Grade than Young Adult, with more fun than you would normally expect from a YA book and a much happier ending. The story is told from several characters viewpoints, so when the Twins and Mumpo were in the desert, you could see what was happening back in Aramanth, from Ira and Hanno Hath's eyes. During this, I loved Ira Hath's small rebellion, and read a quite a few pages to my partner. The read some more when the narrative switched to Hanno Hath!

When I originally read The Wind Singer, Mumpo greatly annoyed me and I often found myself wishing his character wasn't in the story at all. However, now I'm older I found myself sympathising with the character and wanting Kess and Bowman to be friends with him, as he was clearly a bit special! Kess and Bowman are equally string characters but in different ways. They can speak to each other telepathically, but this isn't touched upon much in The Wind Singer, so I'm hoping that we'll know more in the next. In addition, Bowman seems to be able to connect with other's emotions and almost read their minds in a way, a skill which often proves useful.
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