Buy Used
£6.18
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by UK_BOOKSTORE_
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item is in good condition. Books may have some underlines and highlights. Textbooks may not include supplements such as CD, access code, etc. We process and dispacth fast. Your satisfaction is guaranteed.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History (New in Paper) (Public Square) Paperback – 2011


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.43 £6.18


Product details

  • Paperback
  • ASIN: B00719IPRI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jaylia3 on 1 Nov. 2010
Format: Hardcover
According to Jill LePore's book the American founding fathers were not prophets and they didn't want to be worshipped. They struggled to make an imperfect but working Constitution that contained many compromises none of them were happy about, including that found in Article 1, Section 2, Paragraph 3 which counted slaves as three-fifths of a person. In Federalist 14, Madison was disdainful of people who let a blind veneration for the past overrule their own good sense, knowledge and experience.

The Tea Party has misunderstood much of early American history by conflating the past and the present, but that's not surprising because political movements have been appropriating and misrepresenting the American Revolution since not much after its last shots was fired. Both civil rights leaders and southern segregationists considered themselves the true sons of liberty. This book is thick with examples of competing ideologies claiming the mantle of America's beginnings for themselves, especially during the preparations for the Bicentennial in the 1970s when a divided country couldn't agree on what its lessons were.

THE WHITES OF THERE EYES weaves back and forth between the country's early history and the events of the present day, leading up to the November 2010 midterm elections. Rather than focusing on candidates, LePore spends time with the Tea Party members themselves, especially from the Boston area which is where much of the early American history she covers takes place. The historical sections are among the most interesting and moving parts of the book, especially the running back story on Benjamin Franklin and his sister Jane, which LePore uses in part to illustrate how easily the history can be misinterpreted.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 43 reviews
127 of 151 people found the following review helpful
Answers the Question: What do the modern Tea Party movements have to do with American history? Not much. 20 Oct. 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The ad hominem attacks on Lepore and this book are as absurd as they are predictable. This is not intended to be a comprehensive book on American history or the revolutionary period. It sets out simply to record the ad nauseam remarks that have been made articulating the motivation of the so-called Tea Party, though Lepore in no way characterizes it as monolithic, and to cast it against what we know of the period being invoked to demonstrate how even a cursory knowledge of the people and events of that time necessarily problematizes the narrative they present, and thus raises doubts about its tidy simplicity. This does not really take much, for any expressed desire to "return to the intent of the founders" necessarily runs afoul of modern sensibilities on race, gender and class equality, given that the government they set up disenfranchised blacks, women and often those who did not own property. And in also analyzing Rifkin's leftist TEA (Tax Equity for All) Party of the early 1970s, Lepore makes clear that this distortion of history to serve a political narrative is nothing new nor is it the sole province of the Right. Thus her criticism over the (mis)use of history is aimed at both the Left and the Right, and also at the complacent scholars who have let it happen, notwithstanding the name-calling in negative reviews.
There is opinion in the work, to be sure, but there is also argument and evidence, two things that seem lacking in every ideological critique I have seen so far of this book (those that stop simply at "this is not conservative, ergo it's liberal, ergo don't read it"). As Lepore repeats several times over, this is what history is: a combative, contentious, argument (like all academic disciplines) over how best to read the evidence, not a simplistic narrative reflecting (conveniently) the ideological purposes of its espousers, and couched in little more complexity than is found in an elementary-school play. Even less so, as her heart-tugging description of school children learning about the Revolution at the close of the book (which begs comparison to many of her Tea Party interviews even if she does not expressly offer it as such) so neatly illustrates.
History (like all other scholarly pursuits) is complex and messy, and requires critical research to uncover a past that is remote from us. This is not some new, radical, theorem; it is the bedrock of all academic pursuits. That does indeed frustrate ideological, political narratives, but then, that's what stubborn facts usually do.
55 of 68 people found the following review helpful
Delusions Of History 2 Nov. 2010
By John D. Cofield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Jill Lepore's short but excellent look at the modern Tea Party movement well depicts its eccentricities and foibles. More importantly, Lepore also provides some badly needed reminders that our country's founders weren't divinities handing down some sort of blueprint from the heavens.

It is rare to find so much cogent thought and analysis packed into less than two hundred pages. In many ways this is a sad book, because Dr. Lepore and most of her readers find the hijacking of our national history by politicians and media personalities making false claims about "originalism" and the supposed evangelicalism of the Constitution's writers deeply depressing. Its also disturbing to be once more confronted with evidence of how ignorant and deluded so many of the modern Tea Partiers are. But there's hope in places, particularly those that deal with elementary school children who are learning about the American Revolution free of the distortions being imposed on so many of their elders.

Many of the modern Tea Partiers would find this book both accessible and informative, and its unfortunate that a number of them, seeing that its published by one Ivy League school and that its author is a professor at another while also writing for The New Yorker, will refuse to read it. But people who do read it will find its lessons in what history actually is and how easily it is distorted will find The Whites Of Their Eyes a gleam of sunlight in what seems to be gathering darkness.
25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
A Brief Argument Against Historical Fundamentalism 20 Jan. 2011
By Indielectual - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In five relatively to-the-point chapters, the author demonstrates how "Historical Fundamentalism" is akin to religious fundamentalism, wherein the meaning of ancient texts (and the intent of the authors of said texts) are absolutely known by the fundamentalist interpreter. And despite the myriad interpretations one might make of these older texts -- be they from the Bible or from the U.S. Constitution -- there can be but a single interpretation, according to historical fundamentalist.

In each chapter, Ms. Lepore juxtaposits the current crop of historical fundamentalists who claim to know exactly who the "founding fathers" are and what precisely these fathers intended the Constitution to communicate, with previous fundamentalist movements in the early- to mid-1970s, and with the struggles of the 18th century revolutionaries to craft the Constitution (and other documents) given the very specific circumstances of their time. Along the way, Ms. Lepore debunks some recently-popular notions about the role of Christianity in Federal governance, the Constitution as Scripture that is not to be tampered with, and whether revolution is an acceptable vehicle for government change, to mention a few. She also explains how the scholarship of history works given that history isn't often clean-cut and straightforward, as compared to the misuse and over-simplification of historical events and documents to score political and social points in our national discourse. The heavily-annotated text provides lots of leaping-off points for those who wish to learn more about any particular subject.

Note for Kindle users: In addition to fully linked contents and footnotes, the Kindle edition comes with an alphabetized, fully linked subject index. This index is 22% of the book, which indicates just how much information Ms. Lepore packs into this easy-to-digest read.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Enjoyable, Engaging Read 1 May 2011
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book for many reasons.

One, the voice with which this author wrote the book is informative, but light. She managed to make her point, providing great examples and justification, while using language that made the book accessible to non-historians.

Second, I found the contrast between the 1970s and now informative. When I read in the summary that she was not only going to talk about the American Revolution, but also the American Bicentennial, I was skeptical on its inclusion. But, as I read the book, it became clear that the comparison betweeen the American Bicentennial and the current Tea Party's use of American History was necessary to make the point of history fundamentalism. It also balanced the book's analysis of historical fundamentalism so as to make the book balanced. As a result, the book is neither anti-conservative, nor anti-progressive, but rather a defense of critical inquiry into history.

Finally, it was nice revisit aspects of the American Revolution and read the participants own conflicting intrepretation of the times they lived in. In this book, the founding fathers came down from the pedastal and showcased their humanity as opinionated men living during chaotic times.

Overall, the book was enlighting, engaging, and informative. I plan to share this title with family and friends.
18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Men, Not Prophets or Gods 1 Nov. 2010
By Jaylia3 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
According to Jill LePore's book our founding fathers were not prophets and they didn't want to be worshipped. They struggled to make an imperfect but working Constitution that contained many compromises none of them were happy about, including that found in Article 1, Section 2, Paragraph 3 which counted slaves as three-fifths of a person. In Federalist 14, Madison was disdainful of people who let a blind veneration for the past overrule their own good sense, knowledge and experience.

The Tea Party has misunderstood much of early American history by conflating the past and the present, but that's not surprising because political movements have been appropriating and misrepresenting the Revolution since not much after its last shots was fired. Both civil rights leaders and southern segregationists considered themselves the true sons of liberty. This book is thick with examples of competing ideologies claiming the mantle of America's beginnings for themselves, especially during the preparations for the Bicentennial in the 1970s when a divided country couldn't agree on what its lessons were.

THE WHITES OF THERE EYES weaves back and forth between the country's early history and the events of the present day, leading up to the November 2010 midterm elections. Rather than focusing on candidates, LePore spends time with the Tea Party members themselves, especially from the Boston area which is where much of the early American history she covers takes place. The historical sections are among the most interesting and moving parts of the book, especially the running back story on Benjamin Franklin and his sister Jane, which LePore uses in part to illustrate how easily the history can be misinterpreted.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback