Start reading The Whisper Jar on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.
OR
Read for free
with Kindle Unlimited

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Whisper Jar
 
 

The Whisper Jar [Kindle Edition]

Carole Lanham , Kari Wolfe , Thomas Sullivan
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Print List Price: £4.99
Kindle Price: £2.01 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £2.98 (60%)
 
Kindle Unlimited Read this title for £0.00 and get unlimited access to over 700,000 titles. Learn More
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £2.01  
Paperback £4.99  
Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy unlimited access to over 650,000 titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month, including this one. Learn more


Product Description

Product Description

"I do not know what you have done, but put your mouth right here. Confess your crime to this fruit jar as though it were God's ear." ~ from The Whisper Jar

Some secrets are kept in jars -- others, in books.

Some are left forgotten in musty rooms -- others, created in old barns.

Some are brought about by destiny -- others, born in blood.

Secrets -- they are the hidden heart of this collection. In these pages, you will encounter a Blood Digger who bonds two children irrevocably together; a young woman who learns of her destiny through the random selection of a Bible verse; and a boy whose life begins to reflect the stories he reads...

"If you like dark, creepy stories with a theme of secrets and dark characters, you're going to love this (I did!). It's the perfect read for Halloween, and I can certainly recommend it highly. I had a great time with all of these stories, and it's no surprise to me that all these stories have won acclaim in their own right."
Colin F. Barnes, author of Killing my Boss

"Every now and then, a collection of short stories comes along that not only brings creepiness to new levels, but reaches in a little deeper and leaves something behind. The stories in The Whisper Jar are like that...they stick with you like soft voices in the memory. A great book for a dark and stormy night..."

David Niall Wilson, Award-winning author of Deep Blue, This is My Blood, and CEO of Crossroad Press

"Few writers can make love seem so horrible, or horror seem so lovely. The weird scenes Lanham paints for us are poignant and final, with hope strangled - but always in some strangely uplifting way. Perhaps gruesome and memorable are the best words to describe her work."

Dr. Kim Paffenroth, author of Dying to Live and Gospel of the Living Dead

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 289 KB
  • Print Length: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Morrigan Books (31 Oct 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0062ID33K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #669,746 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The Whisper Jar" by Carole Lanham 4 Oct 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Anthologies are one of best ways for discovering new authors, but recently I find myself more and more attracted by the collections of stories signed by one writer. It is an even better method of feeling the power behind the writers' talent, an extended source in identifying the author's voice and finding new stories to enjoy. With this the driving thought and with an open mind I turned the first page of Carole Lanham's debut collection, "The Whisper Jar", and started reading.
"Whisper Jar" - The inhabitants of High Cross start to keep their secrets stored in jars, but when an accident occurs in the Jar House the safe keeping of the secrets is shattered to pieces. Carole Lanham's collection debuts with this dark poem with lighter tones, but setting the perfect mood for the stories that follow. However, the subject and the characters of the subsequent stories will change. For an even better result.
"Next day she found her little boy, ashamed and blushing pink.
She gave him one good spank and poured her jam into the sink.
"I don't know what you have done, but put your mouth right here.
Confess your crime to this fruit jar as though it were God's ear.""
"The Good Part" - After a mysterious stranger have lived on the nearby field for a few days, Etta suffers changes that her brother, Gidion, cannot fully understand. But when the lives of the people Gidion loves are threatened by this change he has to make one very important choice. The main theme of "The Good Part" is only hinted, but Carole Lanham returns to the roots of this subject and gives back its dark side in an era dominated by misplaced romance.
"Keepity Keep" - Alban and Gage Turnbull find Petaloo, a fairy who becomes their best friend, in the garden of their house.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  25 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I devoured this book 3 Nov 2011
By Delisa Carnegie - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The Whisper Jar by Carole Lanham was surprisingly delicious. This collection of short stories is the best thing I have read awhile. Each story takes you someplace you never thought you would go. Carole mixes a dark naughtiness with children's innocence to create stories both magickal and a sinister.

I couldn't stop reading. I would like to read more of her work.
This collection of 9 tales of naughty girls and curious boys pulls you into worlds that are intriguing and dangerous, nothing is safe. I don't want to give too much away, because it really is something that you should experience yourself.

I found it delicious, worrying, and a little disturbing.

There is blood drinking, drug use (of the magickal sort), sex (not explicit), and burning pork bombs. What more could one want?
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The Whisper Jar" by Carole Lanham 4 Oct 2012
By Mihai (Dark Wolf's Fantasy Reviews) - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Anthologies are one of best ways for discovering new authors, but recently I find myself more and more attracted by the collections of stories signed by one writer. It is an even better method of feeling the power behind the writers' talent, an extended source in identifying the author's voice and finding new stories to enjoy. With this the driving thought and with an open mind I turned the first page of Carole Lanham's debut collection, "The Whisper Jar", and started reading.
"Whisper Jar" - The inhabitants of High Cross start to keep their secrets stored in jars, but when an accident occurs in the Jar House the safe keeping of the secrets is shattered to pieces. Carole Lanham's collection debuts with this dark poem with lighter tones, but setting the perfect mood for the stories that follow. However, the subject and the characters of the subsequent stories will change. For an even better result.
"Next day she found her little boy, ashamed and blushing pink.
She gave him one good spank and poured her jam into the sink.
"I don't know what you have done, but put your mouth right here.
Confess your crime to this fruit jar as though it were God's ear.""
"The Good Part" - After a mysterious stranger have lived on the nearby field for a few days, Etta suffers changes that her brother, Gidion, cannot fully understand. But when the lives of the people Gidion loves are threatened by this change he has to make one very important choice. The main theme of "The Good Part" is only hinted, but Carole Lanham returns to the roots of this subject and gives back its dark side in an era dominated by misplaced romance.
"Keepity Keep" - Alban and Gage Turnbull find Petaloo, a fairy who becomes their best friend, in the garden of their house. But when the boys grow older the competition for Petaloo's attention sharpens. The reader is left in mourning for the childhood that Alban and Gage Turnbull leave behind. Every little step of the boys' metamorphosis into adults is evoked in the pages of this story with the power of personal experience.
"The Blue Word" - In the Salvation House orphans are raised and schooled until the age of 18 when in a graduation ceremony they are released from the institute. But the mystery surrounding the graduation process might not fit any of the students' dreams. A post-apocalyptic setting in which the death of a dream can be the most terrifying side of the horror element.
"Maxwell Treat's Museum of Torture for Young Girls and Boys" - After Hayden's parents are involved in a tragic accident he moves in the house of his cousins where the Treat brothers are putting together a museum dedicated to torture. Melancholic, frustrated and cheerful all together, the story holds the reader on the toes, always keeping things around the corner in such fashion that not even the smallest of glimpses or glances can be seen.
"Friar Garden, Mister Samuel, and the Jilly Jally Butter Mints" - The sisters Estrella and Esme and Samuel, the son of the household employed nurse, escape the everyday reality with the help of the colorful Jilly Jally Butter Mints. Imagination is literally brought to life here and the toys and games are enhanced by magic. The misunderstandings can bring the tragic into play though and only the narrow minds of adults can give them power over magic.
"The Reading Lessons" - Lucinda and Hadley are two friends, whose destinies are not meant to cross, with a love for forbidden books and readings. Lucinda, despite her caprices, is the gravitating point for Hadley and their usual play almost an addiction. And like any addiction no good can come out of it.
"The Adventures of Velvet Honeybone, Girl Werewuff" - The second poem of the collection, this time untouched by the lighter tones of the first one, is a replay of the Little Red Riding Hood with the added touch of one particular mythological aspect and in the personal and excellent manner of Carole Lanham.
"The Forgotten Orphan" - Barnabas, one of the orphans of the Asylum of Fatherless Children, discovers what is hidden behind the security door of the attic. Carole Lanham places the story for the grand finale of this mighty collection again in an orphanage. But this time, Asylum of Fatherless Children (I can't imagine a more haunting name for an orphanage), is not the place of safety and refuge that Salvation House ("The Blue Word") is. It is not easy to forget the characters of "The Forgotten Orphan", no matter how much time they spend on the stage of the story. It is even harder to grasp the dimension reached by the secret hidden behind attic doors, secret more terrible than the monsters Barnabas and his friends imagine living behind those doors.
Perhaps secrets might be kept in jars, primarily in whisper jars, but Carole Lanham knows to unscrew the lids of these holders of secrets and spill the contains on paper. Particularly those put on storage by children or adolescents, the main characters of all the stories from "The Whisper Jar". Childhood always wakes the reader's nostalgia and Carole Lanham masterfully brings this feeling to life. But every single time she challenges the common, pushes and twists the boundaries. Amusement shifts to tragedy, innocence turns into sexual innuendo, the magical, literally in places, time of play becomes a moment of cruelty, all with the spontaneity of which only the children are capable of. None of these transformations, however, are straightforward. Every little change is made with an admirable subtlety, not one of them offensive and all natural. Every time the unexpected is an important ingredient and a seasoning element of surprise.
The same goes for the terror component, Carole Lanham does nothing for the sake of horror or shock, she doesn't use blood and violence in an attempt to terrify her readers by all means. She makes the readers uncomfortable in a refined and intelligent manner and putting an attractive language to work in favor of her stories. With such qualities reflected from "The Whisper Jar", Carole Lanham already announces herself as a prominent figure of the genre from her debut collection. As a matter of fact, the horror genre needs more such writers to raise it to its deserved and true value.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Looking for something new? 25 Mar 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Throw together a bit of Tim Burton, a pinch of Neil Gaiman, a little Flannery O'Connor, and top it all off with a helping of David Lynch, and you might have something resembling the uniquely disturbing - and charming - voice of Carole Lanham.
In Lanham's tales, the innocent magic of childhood has grown dark and tainted in the twilight realm of adolescence. The emergence of new appetites takes on a sinister flavor, in worlds which are both hometown folksy and simultaneously surreal. Whether showing us a new take on a very old monster in The Good Part or inventing the sort of treat even Willy Wonka never dreamed of in Friar Garden, Master Samuel, and the Jilly Jally Butter Mints, Lanham's deft prose enchants as it unsettles.
Highly recommended!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Whisper Jar 20 Feb 2012
By Mike Norris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The Whisper Jar pries into the forbidden world of children, where pacts made in secluded places often see to the downfall of naughty boys and girls. Steeped in mischief and magic, Carole Lanham's collection is reminiscent of classic Grimm fairy tales, each masterfully honed to a contemporary edge with her wit and the darkest variety of humor. She often discovers her impish and enchanting characters along the thin hem between childhood and adolescence, where innocence is corrupted by creeping promiscuity. They trade their simple joys and summer days like so many marbles for the more alluring mysteries of fledgling sexuality. Strange relationships are forged as deviant playmates apply cruel leverage upon their smitten followers, gradually increasing the level of risk until ordinary children's games become sadistic, and even deadly. Her protagonists' capacity for suffering at the hands of the ones they love most seems almost infinite. As stakes are continually raised, you will find yourself wondering how much more abuse can they endure, these nymphs of Carole's world, before something is irreparably broken.

The Whisper Jar cannot easily be classified to a particular genre of fiction. There are elements of fantasy and horror, but with Carole's light touch, the romantic tone is so tastefully suggestive of darker layers as to remain wonderfully ambiguous. And these characters, what are they? These suffering cherubs who populate Carole's world, they yearn to bite while playing, and to be bitten. They are like us, yet they are not. Like imperfect ghosts from an emotionally-heightened time of transition that now seems to us so surreal, so blurred in our memories from the weird cocktail of hormones that dissolved our childhoods and shifted the shapes of our bodies and minds. Neither children nor adolescents, they are the forgotten ones, the formless and wavering reflections from the thinnest transition in our lives that Carole Lanham has somehow recalled and thrust into the spotlight.

Each of Carole Lanham's tales is set in a unique and exciting time period, all overflowing with references, turns-of-phrase and humorous beats that breathe life into her settings. Each scene is lovingly polished with her penchant for classical styles and architecture until they shine like the play of sunlight through clerestory windows. You will feel like you're eavesdropping as you follow Carole's irresistible little imps as they evade flawed caregivers to run hand in hand down fragrant garden pathways, across murmuring brooks and into forest clearings where only fairies witness their whispered secrets, life promises, and dark bargains bound in blood.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique, yet deliciously dreadful 5 Feb 2012
By Curtis Hoffmeister - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Yes, this book is certainly unique - no other writer I'm aware of has a voice quite like Carole Lanham's. But deliciously dreadful? Yeah, it's that, too. The dreadful part (and there's always a dreadful part) describes the truly awful things she does to her characters. And she does them with alarming frequency. Be forewarned, Lanham doesn't really do happy endings. That said, her endings are definitely thought provoking, and each fits the story it's married to with absolute perfection.

A collection of short stories plus a couple of poems, this is a well-crafted piece of work. It's entertaining and refreshingly different, combining fantasy, horror and suspense in a way only the Horror Homemaker could. Maybe she blends the ingredients in her kitchen, using some kind of malevolent mixer borrowed from the underworld. Whatever, she gave me the creeps...which is exactly what we want when we read books like these.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category