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The Weird Sisters Hardcover – 20 Jan 2011


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Hardcover, 20 Jan 2011
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Pub Group (T) (20 Jan. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399157220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399157226
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.1 x 23.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,431,965 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Eleanor Brown has lived in many places, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, England, and South Florida. She has had many jobs, including wedding coordinator, freelance writer, executive assistant and teacher. The Weird Sisters is her first novel.

Product Description

Review

‘It’s I CAPTURE THE CASTLE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES, an eccentric and totally irresistible read’
Glamour

‘Three sisters, as different in temperament as King Lear’s daughters, each return to their parental home, harbouring secrets … A funny and insightful mirror to reality’
Easy Living

‘If you didn’t know, you’d never guess that this thoroughly enjoyable novel was the author’s first’
Daily Mail

‘What a joy to read. What a VOICE. The Weird Sisters is family drama dissected by verbal scalpel. If wit and language could protect against growing old, these bewitching sisters might never have to grow up.’
Helen Simonson, best-selling author of Major Pettigrew's Last Stand

‘5 stars’
Heat Magazine

‘Bright, literate debut…the stage clearly belongs to the sisters; Hamlet’s witches would be proud of the toil and trouble they stir up.’
Publisher’s Weekly

‘Even if you don't have a sister, you may feel like you have one after reading this hilarious and utterly winsome novel.’
Sarah Blake, best-selling author of The Postmistress

‘At once hilarious, thought-provoking and poignant, this sparkling and devourable debut explores the roles that we play with our siblings, whether we want to or not. The Weird Sisters is a tale of the complex family ties that threaten to pull us apart, but sometimes draw us together instead.’
J. Courtney Sullivan, best-selling author of Commencement

‘Eleanor Brown has written a compelling novel about love, despair and birth order-the themes the Bard himself had claimed and burnished.’
Min Jin Lee, author of Free Food for Millionaires

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Eleanor Brown has lived in many places, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, England, and South Florida. She has had many jobs, including wedding coordinator, freelance writer, executive assistant and teacher. The Weird Sisters is her first novel.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sukie VINE VOICE on 26 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Meet the Andreas sisters: Rose (Rosalind), the eldest, who is sensible, practical and in charge of everyone and everything. Bean (Bianca), the glamorous middle one, who left their dull childhood home as fast as was possible and escaped to the bright lights of New York. And Cordy (Cordelia), the youngest: cute, guileless and laidback who has never really grown up.
The sisters have gone their separate ways and drifted apart since childhood, but their mother's illness draws them all back together, and they find themselves living under the same roof alongside one another for the first time in years. With each sister nursing a secret worry that she fears will make her appear vulnerable in front of the other two, it is an awkward, tense time - but maybe the sisters have more in common than at first they thought?
I enjoyed this novel very much. The characters of the sisters are distinct and thoughtfully drawn, and I found myself caring about their individual predicaments. The telling of their stories is beautifully done too, in a 'plural' rather than singular voice, so that they tell the tale in unison, with a 'we' voice rather than 'I'. It's not a perfect book - the epilogue felt disappointingly rushed (the ending of the mother's story felt particularly glossed over) and the constant quoting of Shakespeare got on my nerves very quickly - but overall, the novel felt fresh, quirky and it kept me engaged.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lola may on 22 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
I bought this book after reading several positive reviews and was really looking forward to getting stuck in. However, after reading it over several evenings (it is a short easy read) I was quite underwhelmed. I felt the sisters were very cliched- the sensible one, the promiscious one, the dreamer, and so was their journey- I knew from the beginning what would happen to them as they are such familiar fictitious characters. To me it was pretty much run-of-the-mill chick-lit. I think if it wasn't for the Shakespeare element (which was a nice touch but not a major element of the story) this book would have gone by fairly unnoticed.

I'm not saying I didn't enjoy it- it is beautifully written and the unusual plural narrative is pleasantly odd. It is a nice book to curl up with and enjoy but is unfortunately quite forgettable.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Leah Graham TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
"We became home because we were failures," begins The Weird Sisters and that quote only really made sense to me once I'd completed the book, but it's a wonderful quote even before I knew what it meant. I liked how the Prologue set the novel up. It's only short, maybe a page and a half but it sets the story up. We learn about the girls' dad, who is a Shakespeare professor and we learn their mother is ill, which leads to them all coming home. We see where the girls are currently living; Cordy is travelling, Bean is in New York and Rose is living with her fiance Jonathan as they prepare for the journey back to Barney, back to where they grew up. Rose is a homebody, so coming home for her isn't an issue, in fact it's what she lives for whereas the opposite is true for Cordy and Bean. They hate being in such a small town.

What makes The Weird Sisters unique (to me, at least; I'm sure there are many novels that feature William Shakespeare but this is the first I've read) is the Shakespeare factor. The Andreas family are voracious readers and their dad is a Shakespeare professor, so it rather goes without saying that the girls lives are very much soaked into Shakespeare. They're named after Shakespeare's characters: Cordelia, Rosalind, Bianca. The title of the novel comes from Shakespeare and the girls and their dad consistently quote sentences written by the bard himself. Now comes the difficult part. For me. My knowledge of Shakespeare is shaky. I know he wrote Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet amongst others. I know he's revered. But I've never read a piece of Shakespeare's work so I truly thought the amount of Shakespeare in the novel would put me off, but it didn't.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Wright VINE VOICE on 26 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Circumstances in their personal lives lead the three Andreas sisters back to their family home. Middle sister Bianca (Bean) begrudgingly returns after being fired from her job for stealing, and the baby of the family Cordelia (Cordy) is pregnant after years following bands on the road. Sensible eldest sibling Rosalind (Rose) has never strayed far from her home town of Barnwell, Ohio, but her fiancé Jonathan has accepted a sabbatical in England and this puts a strain on the couple's relationship.

Even though they all have their own reasons for coming back to Barney, they like to keep the real reasons under wraps, and instead they each express outwardly that the reason they need to be there is to look after their mother who is being treated for breast cancer. However, despite their obvious differences, the 'Weird Sisters,' are a lot more alike than they think; unwilling to face their own insecurities, all three believing that the other two sisters are happier, more successful and more loved by their parents.

There are several reasons why this book warrants such as low star rating. Firstly, the girls' father is obsessed with Shakespeare and this is a common theme throughout the book as the characters speak to each other in dialogue from his works, which is extremely irritating. Secondly, the sisters are all very self-absorbed caricatures and as such it is hard to feel a connection to any of them for the most part of the book. Finally, and most importantly, the book is pretty slow paced and nothing very much happens, which wouldn't be a problem in itself. However, it is blatantly obvious what the outcome of each of the Andreas sisters' stories will be from the outset and thus it is difficult to want to read a book when you already know exactly what is going to happen. Unfortunately I cannot recommend this book and cannot see the comparisons to 'The Private Lives of Pippa Lee,' and 'The Virgin Suicides,' which are mentioned on the cover.
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