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The Web Content Style Guide: The Essential Reference for Online Writers, Editors and Managers Paperback – 17 Oct 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Financial Times/ Prentice Hall; 1 edition (17 Oct. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0273656058
  • ISBN-13: 978-0273656050
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 1.3 x 20.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 194,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"The Web Content Style Guide is a valuable resource for anyone involved in creating content for the Web."

Janette Young, Managing Information magazine "This comprehensive and authoritative overview of content management  starts with useful guidelines to writing and designing web material.     If only most webmasters could heed the sound advice given here, then   web surfing would be a much happier experience for us all! Following this, the glossary of terms and definitions also deserves  thorough reading. Even the more obvious terms are defined to  encyclopaedic depth that clearly has benefited from the authors'  wealth of experience in content management. I will certainly be  recommending this book to people who attend our writing for the web  courses." Malcolm Davison, Managing Director, writingfortheweb.co.uk  "The first chapter alone of The Web Content Style Guide is worth the price of the book.   Great ideas on writing for either traditional or web viewers. Easy to read and insightful."  Phil Matous, CEO, Taylor Community Credit Union, Michigan, USA

About the Author

Gerry McGovern

is a web consultant and author. He has spoken and written extensively on Internet issues over the last seven years. He is an advisory editor for The Business Database (Bloomsbury) on the subject of ecommerce and writes a column for the popular marketing website, clickz.com, on the subject of content management. He also has his own highly regarded and widely read online newsletter, New Thinking.

Previously, Gerry was founder and chief executive officer of Nua, a content management software development company.

Rob Norton is a freelance journalist in New York City. He is a contributing editor at Business 2.0 magazine, for which he writes the Leading Questions column, as well as news stories and feature articles. He also writes and publishes Net Style, a weekly online newsletter. Rob also does consulting work in journalism, publishing, website design, and information architecture.

Previously Rob was Executive Editor at Fortune magazine, where he was a member of the management team that revamped Fortune in 1996. He was responsible for "First," Fortune's innovative front of the magazine section, and directed Fortune’s economics coverage. Rob joined Fortune in 1984, and worked for several years in the magazine’s Washington bureau. He has written several cover stories and dozens of feature stories, and also edited Fortune’s 70th anniversary issue in February, 2000.

Catherine O’Dowd works as a web consultant with Arconics Ltd, a Dublin-based developer of web publishing and information architecture software. She has previously worked as an online editor for a number of IT companies, as well as freelancing for various print publications.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By "lawrenceattrill" on 12 Aug. 2002
Format: Paperback
I was needing a book that really covered content style, so that my websites were more worthwhile from the readers point of view. Sadly what I got here was 32 pages of little depth on content style, 202 pages of an A to Z of web terms that could have come from any PC magazine, and four pages of sample style. I really needed this book to be 202 pages on content style, as I've been in the business long enough to know what ISP, TCP, and URL stand for.
Ideal for managers then!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Cara Given on 8 Feb. 2002
Format: Paperback
McGovern and Norton have compiled the definitive guide to making your website simple, clear and easy to use. Nothing is more frustrating than labyrinthine sites that are unclear and difficult to navigate; this book shows you how to strip away unnecessary complications that put your site in this category.
The book is in three sections: writing for the web, designing for the web, and an A-Z of content style. The first section is particularly good, packed with excellent advice about writing for the web, writing in general, and most importantly, editing yourself. Advice on traditional forms of writing by George Orwell, Samuel Johnson, William Faulkner et al are applied. The A-Z is a complete encylopedia of working on the web, which I will be keeping on my desk for frequent consultation.
An ideal reference guide for all writers, editors, publishers and managers of web content.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "youresonorthern" on 3 Dec. 2001
Format: Paperback
This comprehensive and authoritative overview of content management starts with useful guidelines to writing and designing web material. If only most webmasters could heed the sound advice given here, then web surfing would be a much happier experience for us all! Following this, the glossary of terms and definitions also deserves thorough reading. Even the more obvious terms are defined to encyclopaedic depth that clearly has benefited from the authors' wealth of experience in content management. I will certainly be recommending this book to people who attend our writing for the web courses.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 18 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Not particularly impressive attempt at a web style guide 1 Jun. 2002
By L. Blackmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My initially reaction was "wow, this is really useful." But a closer read left me disappointed. The initial 32 pages are a half-decent set of Miss Manners for web publishing, but nowhere near as comprehensive (or, IMHO, useful) as e.g. Krug's "Don't Make Me Think". The remaining 200 or so pages are an attempt at a glossary/style guide alphabet-style. Some of the definitions are useful enough - it is nice to finally have the web site/website discussion solved in print.
But it is unclear what ground the authors wanted to cover, and the selections are an odd bunch, many of the definitions are incomplete. Why is there a specific entry for "Australian dollar"? The definition of "authentication" talks only about credit card authorization - there's nothing about user authentication. And why does ASP get its own definition, while PHP, ColdFusion, Perl and any number of other technologies are omitted?
I was very impressed with McGovern and Norton's "Content Critical", but their style guide is a bit of a dud.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
First 30 pages are all you really need. 31 Oct. 2003
By Kristina Halvorson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm a huge fan of McGovern, but this book isn't worth the money. You can actually read the first section of the book - the part I really loved - at his web site for free: [...] The "sample web style guide" at the end of the book is woefully underwritten. Buy CONTENT CRITICAL instead.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Almost Criminal 2 May 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is next to useless as a web style guide. Of the 224 pages only the first 35 pages are devoted to the topic of style. The rest of the book is a glossary of terms with little practical use. Most of the material presented in this book is available on the web for free and in greater detail.
My first glance through the book was a disappointment. Two days later I gave it a second chance but it confirmed my first impression so I sent it back.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Incredibly bad printing quality 7 Sept. 2005
By C. Spitler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This author is highly recommended, but the printing quality is worse than from an extremely poor fax machine. I really don't care about the quality of the content as trying to read it would be unbearable. It is going back immediately.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Poor content, poor print quality . How'd this ever get published? 10 Dec. 2005
By Jackie Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was useless to me, and also maddening because it purported to address issues with quality of content. I should have read the other reviews here and then steered clear of this book. The content is anemic: nothing of substance here. And the publication looks like someone took it to a copy shop and made a copy of a copy.

This book simply does not offer useful information or -- by virtue of content and presentation -- 'walk the talk' of the importance of quality content.
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