Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Web (A Hamlyn original) [Paperback]

Richard Lewis
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback --  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Hamlyn (12 Nov 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0600202712
  • ISBN-13: 978-0600202714
  • Product Dimensions: 17.4 x 10.6 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,142,613 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
"Spiders" was one of a whole bunch of nature-goes-berserk apocalyptic thrillers to come out during the mid- to late seventies, and it did well enough, along with the popularity of Aliens movies, of which the creatures here kinda, sorta resembles, so that suspense writer Alan Radnor (as Richard Lewis) would a couple of years later (four years later in "The Web") write this sequel. Unlike "Spiders" and "The Devil's Coach-Horse" (a. k. a.: "The Black Terror") this book never saw an American reprinting, so we missed it over here, and I didn't find out about it until recently. Too bad.

Like all of Lewis's books "The Web" starts off with a bloody death. In this case it's the alcoholic and homeless ex-vet Angus McInnes who has drunk himself into a wandering hell of abuse and pain. Unfortunately, his real pain is about to begin as he camps out in the abandoned and crumbling ruins of an old building only to find that it is already inhabited. He is cocooned by the surviving man-eating spiders from the first novel, who have breed and who have now rebuilt their numbers, with variations, there are at least three separate types of spiders running amok now, in scattered locations across England. This time there is a spider that can turn animals into mindless killing machines, presaging "28 Days Later" by well over a decade and half. Mad cow disease indeed!

While the hero of "Spiders", Alan Mason, makes his appearance in this novel, it's not until we are past the hundred page mark that we see him. This time, the hero of the novel is John Lever, a reporter on his way up, even though his marriage is on the way down. Like a British Karl Kolchak, he stumbles onto several victims of the spiders, although he doesn't recognize the signs at first.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars More Spiders 5 Aug 2013
Format:Paperback
A direct sequel to Spiders, this continues the story up North where the last few mutants made there escape.
Written in a pulp horror style, the story zips along and blood and guts a plenty.
If you can pick this up second hand its well worth a read.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad follow-up sequel..... 25 Oct 2010
Format:Paperback
I loved Richard Lewis' first book Spiders, which would make a brilliant cheesy horror film. This is a follow-up title which tries to expand a bit more on the first book. Without giving away to much, I wasn't massively impressed as there are too many characters initially and, also the characters from the original make a cameo, but it was not as I expected. Overall an exciting and gory read like the first, but doesn't quite have the originality of the first.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars "He...saw them for the first time. Quietly...descending from the tops of the walls...like slow motion bombs. Spiders..." 17 May 2010
By Mark Louis Baumgart - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
"Spiders" was one of a whole bunch of nature-goes-berserk apocalyptic thrillers to come out during the mid- to late seventies, and it did well enough, along with the popularity of Aliens movies, of which the creatures here kinda, sorta resembles, so that suspense writer Alan Radnor (as Richard Lewis) would a couple of years later (four years later in "The Web") write this sequel. Unlike Spiders and Devil's Coach Horse (a. k. a.: "The Black Terror" here in the states) this book never saw an American reprinting. Too bad.

Like all of Lewis's books "The Web" starts off with a bloody death. In this case it's the alcoholic and homeless ex-vet Angus McInnes who has drunk himself into a wandering hell of abuse and pain. Unfortunately, his real pain is about to begin as he camps out in the abandoned and crumbling ruins of an old building only to find that it is already inhabited. He is cocooned by the surviving man-eating spiders from the first novel, who have breed and who have now rebuilt their numbers, with variations, there are at least three separate types of spiders running amok now, in scattered locations across England. This time there is a spider that can turn animals into mindless killing machines, presaging 28 Days Later (Widescreen Edition) by well over a decade and half. Mad cow disease indeed!

While the hero of "Spiders", Alan Mason, makes his appearance in this novel, it's not until we are past the hundred page mark that we see him. This time, the hero of the novel is John Lever, a reporter on his way up, even though his marriage is on the way down. Like a British Karl Kolchak, he stumbles onto several victims of the spiders, although he doesn't recognize the signs at first. Meanwhile his friend and policeman Detective-Inspector Graham Murray is carrying on his own parallel investigation, and eventually both will combine the others into their own to help save the world.

Lewis takes his time this time around as he introduces us to a slightly larger cast in this novel than he usually does. Some of the characters taking up several chapters before their nasty demise, and not all of the characters that are introduced die either, as this time Lewis introduces more suspense to his novel as he is getting much better at what he is doing. Lewis again shows he has a newsman's eye for creating minor characters as he is a master at filling his novels with micro-character vignettes, and as here he gives himself a little room to develop his characters even more than he usually does, with some of them taking up several chapters with their doomed stories. Stand outs were Jack Dawson, a man who has worked his way up from stableboy to the point where he is about to buy the (horse) farm, only to see his entire future destroyed. I was especially taken with Kerry Rhineshaw, an old school farmer, who is the person that originally informs John about the mysterious happenings that are occurring on the nearby farms, and who very much reminded me of my grandfather, who was also a no-nonsense old school farmer.

Like all of Lewis's novels the deaths are nasty, the pacing brisk, the danger portrayed in an intense manner, and like all of his novels, the second half is taken up with the British government going into a full-bore panic. This is because British civilization as we (or they) know it is on the verge of collapsing. There will be a miracle cure for the spider problem, but, once again Lewis leaves himself open for a sequel, and I wish that this had gone the way of James Herbert's "Rats" trilogy or Guy N. Smith's crab books and would have been turned into a series, or at least a trilogy.

Despite a few flaws, this novel is stuck with one god-awful cover, a mere picture of a spider in a spiderweb, and having a horse vomit (horses can't do this) this novel gets all the stars. Maybe some enterprising small-press will bring these little seen, now forgotten novels, "Spiders" and "The Web", back in print in one omnibus volume.

I have also reviewed the following Richard Lewis novels for this site:

Devil's Coach Horse
Night Killers
Rabid
Spiders
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xaed8fb28)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback