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The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing the Climate and What It Means for Life on Earth Paperback – 12 Dec 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 359 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press / Atlantic Monthly Press; Reprint edition (12 Dec. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802142923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802142924
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 13.6 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,850,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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"At last, here is a clear and readable account of one of the most important but controversial issues facing everyone in the world today. If you are not already addicted to Tim Flannery's writing, discover him now: "The Weather Makers" is his best book yet." --Jared Diamond, author of "Collapse" and "Guns, Germs & Steel"

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Mar. 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book clearly sets out the facts and science of climate change and is easy and enjoyable to read.
Climate change has the potential to have a major impact on each of our lives either as individuals, consumers, business men/women, investors etc.
This book gives you a clear picture of what is actually happening through examples and clearly taking you through the science behind it. It gives the different possible outcomes and gives you an idea of what to expect and how soon to expect it.
Excellent!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Iorras on 18 Aug. 2008
Format: Paperback
We Are the Weather Makers: The Story of Global Warming

This is an interesting little book which will keep you reading right to the end. Tim Flannery takes a global look at climate change issues and global warming and although he doesn't quite get it all right all the time (he says Iceland was the country allowed to exceed its 1990 CO2 levels by the greatest amount (10%) but he was unaware that Ireland was allowed to exceed 1990 levels by 13% (and despite these extremely favourable conditions, has managed to mess up and exceed quota by almost three times that amount - SHAME on my selfish and corrupt Government, FDI and countrymen and women!!) Fast paced, Flannery skips from issue to issue to issue. When will we, as a nation and as a world realise that in order for our children and their children to have a future, we MUST act now and QUIT behaving like the self indulgent prats which abound in every town and city in Ireland and across much of the so-called 'developed' world? Is it worth despairing or are we homo sapiens deserving of the future which will befall us (and most other creatures who have the misfortune to share our planet) for our stupidity and greed? Anyway, this book is worth a read. Just wish I could shove it down the throats of those who need to read it too.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on 30 Jan. 2006
Format: Hardcover
"Not another book on climate change!", you lament. Readers may feel surfeited by the rash of books on "global warming" appearing in the past few years. The feeling is understandable. The situation should be considered an indication of how serious the problem is for all humanity. In this case, the author introduces a little-considered aspect. Tim Flannery, whose keen eye and bountiful wit always offers something new presented in a easily readable way, will not leave you jaded nor have your head nodding in ennui. Although Flannery does address some questions dealt with elsewhere, he adds the most significant topic of all - the future of life.
As a zoologist, Flannery has extensive field experience in the forests of New Guinea and elsewhere. He's written of human impact on large animals in North America and Australia. Here, he writes of human impact on all life. Instead of hunting animals to extinction, humans are modifying the entire biosphere through pollutants and gases. This indirect imposition has already killed off at least one species, he demonstrates. In explaining how the Golden Toad went extinct, Flannery sets the scene expansively. The Toad wasn't just a local phenomenon, but died out due to wide-ranging changes in ocean temperature, air mass movements and changes in rainfall. This combination of influences resulted in what appeared to us as a minimal change in habitat. To the Golden Toad, that "minimal change" proved catastrophic. The object lesson is clear. How much change will the species humans rely on for survival tolerate? Flannery, citing James Lovelock's "Gaia" hypothesis of the biosphere as a tightly woven "system", argues that the tolerance for change is meagre. And human-induced change is squeezing the tolerance downward.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joshua on 18 July 2011
Format: Paperback
The Weather Makers was written by Tim Flannery and was published in 2007. The book may be slightly outdated, however the book still manages to engage my interest around climate change and illustrate the process and outcomes of a changing planet will have on us. The book is split into five key sections which can show how the book wants to address different parts and processes associated with global warming. The book is very accessible to read and is split into smaller chapters which are appealing to the readers with a short amount of time to read and yet still want to gain knowledge linked with this global, geographical process.
Concentrating with the five separate sub-topics you can easily understand how the book is well-structured and will inform the reader well. Gaia's tools, One in ten thousand, The science of prediction, people in greenhouses and The solution are the names of the chapters, and the book structures the chapters within each topic so the topics raised flow really well. The structure within this book is superbly done, and is one of its highlights. Each individual chapter lightly touches on an issue or cause rose by global warming, and yet manages to approach this issue in superb detail. From reading the book I have began to understand processes including coral bleaching, biodiversity issues, renewable resources as well as the atmospheric science associated with global warming. This book contains the wide variety of topics, and is a perfect read for anyone who wants to delve into the study of climate science or global warming.
For me, my favourite chapter was The great aerial ocean (second chapter) as it illustrated scientific, atmospheric knowledge with the balance of general experiences which are enjoyable to read.
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