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The Way Between The Worlds: The View From The Mirror Volume 4: v. 4 Paperback – 6 Dec 2001

4.6 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Way Between The Worlds: The View From The Mirror Volume 4: v. 4
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  • Dark Is The Moon: Volume Three of The View From The Mirror
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  • The Tower On The Rift: The View from the Mirror, book 2
Total price: £32.97
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Product details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (6 Dec. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841490733
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841490731
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 4.1 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 328,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

An extended fantasy sequence has always to deliver an impressive pay-off; The Way Between the Worlds is the fourth and final volume of Ian Irvine's "The View From the Mirror" and brings the quartet to a convolutedly triumphant finale. By now, Irvine has entirely involved our sympathies with the feckless, untrustworthy chronicler Llian and the heroic Karan, who loves him, and, to a lesser degree, to the profoundly morally ambiguous Magraith, whose loyalties have been so endlessly warped and abused by various key magical players in this struggle for the artefacts that will re-open the way through the dangers of the void to the home-worlds they lost. Much of the novel has always had to do with Llian's attempts to uncover precisely what occurred when the path between worlds was closed centuries earlier; Irvine plays fair, giving us some answers and making the sequence's resolution depend on those answers. For someone whose fiction plays so thoroughly with ethically grey areas, Irvine is also admirable in his preparedness to sort out endings that feel right; this is a book in which heroes and villains alike get a part of what they want, but a sort of justice as well. Irvine has brought both a lively intelligence and a keen moral sense to the heroics and spell-play of the modern fantasy novel. --Roz Kaveney

Review

An extended fantasy sequence has always to deliver an impressive pay-off; The Way Between the Worlds is the fourth and final volume of Ian Irvine's "The View From the Mirror" and brings the quartet to a convolutedly triumphant finale. By now, Irvine has entirely involved our sympathies with the feckless, untrustworthy chronicler Llian and the heroic Karan, who loves him, and, to a lesser degree, to the profoundly morally ambiguous Magraith, whose loyalties have been so endlessly warped and abused by various key magical players in this struggle for the artefacts that will re-open the way through the dangers of the void to the home-worlds they lost. Much of the novel has always had to do with Llian's attempts to uncover precisely what occurred when the path between worlds was closed centuries earlier; Irvine plays fair, giving us some answers and making the sequence's resolution depend on those answers. For someone whose fiction plays so thoroughly with ethically grey areas, Irvine is also admirable in his preparedness to sort out endings that feel right; this is a book in which heroes and villains alike get a part of what they want, but a sort of justice as well. Irvine has brought both a lively intelligence and a keen moral sense to the heroics and spell-play of the modern fantasy novel. (Roz Kaveney)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I'm not really a SF fan but these books are just so gripping. Irvine has created a truly great masterpiece, and even though I read it over a year ago, I still remember the book fondly. Most of all, the characters. I find myself reminiscing and musing over Karan and Llian from time to time even now. I guess the relationship Irvine created between the reader and his characters is so great it still holds. The plot, the landscape, the writing were all fantastic, but at the top of my list were the unique characters which will stay with me for a very long time indeed. It's an absolutely must read for a fan of any genre and I can only say that if you don't read this, it's your loss.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
couldnt wait to get to the end of this book bit like harry potter the main character is wingy and could not achieve anything if it were not for everyone else around them
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Format: Paperback
A thrilling conclusion to the "A View From the Mirror" quartet.
Highly recommended along with the following quartet - "The Well of Echoes"
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Format: Paperback
This is the fourth and final volume of The View from the Mirror tetralogy (after A Shadow on the Glass, The Tower on the Rift and Dark Is the Moon).
It's hythe, mid-winter's day, in Carcharon Tower, and a dark moon is rising. In exchange for Llian's life and freedom, Rulke has convinced Karan to betray her people and help him open the Way between the Worlds.
In the process, a horde of monsters is unleashed from the void, and while Rulke the Great Betrayer is off exploring, with Karan's mind accompanying him in a trance, her defenseless body is suddenly attacked by deadly Lorrsk and Thranx. But taking advantage of the confusion, she barely manages to escape, to find herself in the cold, snowy mountains again, reminding her of her ordeal of the year before.
In this volume, Rulke wants to save his people, the last hundred or so remaining Charon, from extinction, Faelamor wants to lead her people the Faellem back to Tallallame, Mendark wants to become the most famous magister on Santhenar. And all are ready to sacrifice everything to achieve their goal. Karan just wants to go home and rest.
On the one hand, I was a bit disappointed by the sudden appearance of grotesque monsters which, in my opinion, serve no real purpose and weaken the plot. On the other hand, Mendark, Yggur, Rulke, Faelamor and Shand finally start to show the various facets of their personalities, to become multidimentional, but to such an extent that in the end it's all quite complicated and it's hard to make up one's mind as to whom you want to see win the battle. Hopefully, to glue it all together, there's a whole cast of endearing characters such as Pender, Thallia, Lilis and Jevi, Maigraith Karan and Llian. They're the ones that make you read on.
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