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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The Warrior's Honour is a provocative and timely look at warfare in an age where international consensus appears to have broken down in the face of rampant moral relativism. I've never been a huge fan of Michael Ignatieff (I found his treatment of nationalism patronising) but was pleasantly surprised by his courage and commitment in tackling the really difficult issue of how some kind of common human understanding can be built as to what is and what isn't acceptable in war.
Whether or not his conclusions are comprehensive, this places him alongside Nelson Madella, president Mohammed Khatami of Iran, the Lebanese lawyer Chibli Mallat and others trying to find rules and beliefs that all humanity can adhere to, rather than those (whether "ethnic-cleansers" or US neo-conservatives) who want to impose their own vision and beliefs as the only way forward.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 6 January 2001
Ignatieff has produced an excellent book. It does not read like a random collection of previously published articles and he tackles sensitively and philosophically some of the big issues that are raised by 'modern' conflicts that the world has seen since the end of the Cold War. Examines difficult issues such as the role of ethnicity and so-called 'ethnic hatreds' as somehow abstracted from the real security needs of citizens in the Balkans and Africa and whether the neutrality of teh Red Cross is appopriate in a world of conflicts in which the evil are often obvious. Highly recommended, but do not expect heavy historical detail on individual conflict situations.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The Warrior's Honour is a provocative and timely look at warfare in an age where international consensus appears to have broken down in the face of rampant moral relativism. I've never been a huge fan of Michael Ignatieff (I found his treatment of nationalism patronising) but was pleasantly surprised by his courage and commitment in tackling the really difficult issue of how some kind of common human understanding can be built as to what is and what isn't acceptable in war.
Whether or not his conclusions are comprehensive, this places him alongside Nelson Madella, president Mohammed Khatami of Iran, the Lebanese lawyer Chibli Mallat and others trying to find rules and beliefs that all humanity can adhere to, rather than those (whether "ethnic-cleansers" or US neo-conservatives) who want to impose their own vision and beliefs as the only way forward.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 2 April 1999
I read this book through a class I took and I was impressed by the deep analysis on the issues of ethnic war including a focus of television and media, charitable empathy, the need for conflict, and a warrior's honor. Ignatieff differentiates ethnic wars happening now (civil wars, ethnic wars, brother vs. brother) than that of wars the US has waged in the past (vs. country/nation). These new types of war show a new dynamic of intervention and war atrocities relating to it. The common thread Ignatieff points out is relating to a warrior's honor. Much like chivalry, a soldier in battle should follow certain rules of conduct like not committing atrocities against the indigenous population or letting interventionists take care of the wounded. Ignatieff also focuses on many ethnic conflicts of today in Rwanda, Somalia, and Serbia as examples of the dimension of ethnic war. Ignatieff uses loaded terminology and might be too much to comprehend, but his examples help the reader understand the context he is pushing for. Further examples from Freud's "Narcissism of Minor Diffence" and James Joyce gives this book a well-rounded academic feel. This book gives great insight to human need during ethnic war especially with the current conflict in Kosovo.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 13 March 2000
Attempt to argue the philosophical case for liberal universalism as against nationalist particularism that, unfortunately, fails to confront the most difficult issues and in addition, when discussing the case of the former Yugoslavia, fails to base its arguments on an accurate factual foundation
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 16 December 2001
talk aboutow the television affects the mind of the people and their acts, explain how the compassion maes or not the world to fight
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