Shop now Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop Now Shop now
The Wages of Destruction and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £19.99
  • You Save: £3.41 (17%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Wages of Destruction:... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by fatbrainbooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: May contain minimal notes added by highlighter and/or pen and may be slightly damaged. Dispatch Same Working Day, (Delivery 2-4 business days, Courier For Heavy/Expensive Items) Money Back Guarantee, 99.3% Customer Satisfaction
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy Paperback – 2 Aug 2007

40 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£16.58
£8.79 £7.34
£16.58 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy
  • +
  • The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of Global Order 1916-1931
Total price: £36.98
Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 832 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (2 Aug. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141003480
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141003481
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 196,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

`A remarkable and gripping revision of the history of Nazi Germany' -- New Statesman, Books of the Year

`Masterful ... smashes a gallery of preconceptions'
-- Financial Times

`This book will change the way we look at Nazi history ... nothing less than a masterpiece. Rejoice, rejoice, for a great historian is born' -- Sunday Telegraph

'Adam Tooze's Wages of Destruction is a hugely impressive narrative of the making and breaking of the Nazi economy. The drama and recklessness with which the Germans managed their economic policy are powerfully conveyed'
-- David Gilmour, Spectator Books of the Year

`This is a great book - one of the most important to be written about the Third Reich in years' -- The Times Higher Education Supplement

From the Publisher

Winner of the 2007 Longman-History Today Book of the Year Prize

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Paul T Horgan VINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
It was Watergate that taught us to Follow The Money. Strangely, few people have done this with the Nazi regime. Although the Third Reich was a major military power by 1939, all the guns, bombs and planes had to be paid for and just because it was a murderous dictatorship, this did not mean that it didn't have to follow a fiscal policy. For instance did you know that Germany stayed on the Gold Standard longer than the USA?

Adam Tooze has authored (I believe) the first major work on the Nazi economy since Alan Millward's of the 1960s/70s. He opposes Millward's thesis of the 'Blitzkreig' economy, geared to fight short continental wars and instead shows an economic policy that lurched from crisis to crisis, that was subverted to one man's wish to dominate the world.

Hitler started rearming Germany from the first day he took office and Tooze shows the remarkable feat that took place in such a short time. Germany, for all its ideology and violence, remained a capitalist economy and apparently the rate at which it rearmed was unprecendented. It is this sheer quantity of armaments that secured victories up to 1941.

Of course all the effort was doomed. Tooze demonstrates that all Hitler did was to start a global arms race. He also shows that Germany was constrained in how much it could rearm by critical shortages of material and workers. Although Germany started first, it would have been overtaken by Britain, France, USA and USSR by the mid-forties. Thus Hitler had no choice but to start his war in 1939. If he had delayed by even a year, then it would have taken less time to defeat him..

Tooze also shows, as have many others, that Albert Speer should have been hanged at Nuremburg.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Johnny London on 12 May 2008
Format: Paperback
The author has produced what is surely the last word in explaining the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. This is an economic history, and this allows the real story of the Third Reich to be told. Like all history, the prosecuting of war really depends on the ability to raise and sustain a war machine - this has been the case for most of history. By concentrating on this fundamental fact, the book clarifies the actions of the Third Reich and it's leaders. Essentially, Germany in 1920 had the choice of either accepting it wasn't a major power and becoming a satellite state of the US, living as an exporting economy, or going down the road of war and becoming a world power and exploiting Europe as a conquered empire. Many in Germany at the time refused to accept the former, and through Hitler they made there bid to change the course of history. The author is careful to point out that although this course was fundamentally unsound in view of Germany's real position, there was a lot of logic behind the Nazis world view. Germany was critically dependent on imports of food and materials, it owed huge amounts of money to the US, and had foreign troops on it's soil. Hitler offered what looked like a credible alternative to the man in the street.
The book carefully explains how the Nazis built their war economy, and why it was used at the time and the way it was. Whenever it looked like Germany was losing it's advantage through early mobilisation, war was the only alternative to slow strangulation by naval blockade and air warfare.
After the entry of the US into the war in 1941 by offering aid to the UK, the Nazi leadership knew it had to win the war by 1942. (This thinking made the invasion of the USSR inevitable to the Nazi leadership, who were all to aware of the potential of strategic bombing).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By EnglishLad101 on 8 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You look on the back of the book and see a glowing report from Niall Ferguson, and you think, "Wow, this must be really rubbish." But whatever you do, don't let praise from the risible Ferguson put you off, because this really is a game-changing look at Nazi Germany and much more.

So many sacred cows are slain it's hard to keep count, and the blood loss is appalling. Yet Tooze is unperturbed. I like that fact that he humbly keeps mention of findings that overturn the work of other scholars tucked away at the back of the book in the endnotes - and there are many "victims", including famous names. Where he has overturned someone on something, Tooze also uses and praises, if it is possible, other parts of the "victim"'s oeuvre. What I'm trying to say is that this is not an immature and arrogant man who is brimming with false modesty and who enjoys blowing his own horn (unlike, say, Timothy Snyder), but rather someone who enjoys finding things out and who is simply remarking in passing that what he has discovered does not accord with what has come before, and then softens the blow in the best possible way.

The most satisfying outcome of the book is that Nazi Germany - the decisions, the reasoning, the policies - finally... well, finally make sense, and in an overarching way. In achieving this, Tooze makes significant use of Hitler's second book, which was neglected compared with 'Mein Kampf' as events jumped forward. Thanks in part to the spotlighting of the second book, for all his famous incompetence, delusion, and hubris, Hitler is partially refreshed as someone who, despite it all, also had a good grasp of events. Take a standard view, like Hobsbawm's (p.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback