The Veiled One: (A Wexford Case) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £0.89 (11%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Add to Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Veiled One: (A Wexford Case) Paperback – 30 Apr 2001


See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.10
£2.40 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

The Veiled One: (A Wexford Case) + The Speaker Of Mandarin: (A Wexford Case) + The Vault: (A Wexford Case)
Price For All Three: £19.68

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow; New Ed edition (30 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099602806
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099602804
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 294,390 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ruth Rendell has won many awards, including the Crime Writers' Association Gold Dagger for 1976's best crime novel with A Demon in My View; a second Edgar in 1984 from the Mystery Writers of America for the best short story, 'The New Girl Friend'; and a Gold Dagger award for Live Flesh in 1986. She was also the winner of the 1990 Sunday Times Literary award, as well as the Crime Writers' Association Cartier Diamond Dagger. In 1996 she was awarded the CBE and in 1997 became a Life Peer.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker TOP 500 REVIEWER on 22 Feb 2004
Format: Paperback
The Veiled One is Rendell's 14th Inspector Wexford mystery, and as excellent as all the rest. The continued quality of this series is remarkable. There have only been one or two slightly lacklustre books in it, and those were very early on in her career.
One November evening, Wexford drives him from Barringdean Shopping Centre, noticing nothing amiss. He is preoccupied with family matters. precisely, his daughter Sheila who, in protest, has damaged Ministry of Defence Property, the wire fence surrounding a nuclear weapons facility. An actress, her face is automatically splashed across the papers.
Later, at home, Burden phones through with the news: a garotted body has been founding in the Shopping Centre Car Park, hidden between two cars. She is identified as Gwen Robson, a home-help of late middle-age, who lives in Kingsmarkham with her arthritic husband. However, before Wexford himself cna do much investigating, he too faces death, in the form of a politically motiovated car-bomb inteded for his daughter Sheila. So, Mike Burden forges ahead on his own, quickly narrowing in on a suspect, the son of the woman who found the body. But are his intuitions right?
This is probably Rendell's most psychologically rich mystery. Some of the characters are quite odd, and she lays them psychologically bare, creating fascinating and rather unsettling psychological portraits. Indeed, the depth with which she examines her characters in this book is probably unequalled in any other Wexford novel.
Wexford is on excellent form again, and it's often easy to forget quite what a great lead character he is.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By takingadayoff VINE VOICE on 23 April 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
This had every appearance of being a mainstream police procedural that, even if expertly written, would be entertaining for the duration of the time it took to read it, and then be forgotten quickly. Looks can be deceiving.

Recently I resolved to give Ruth Rendell's Wexford novels a fresh look. Somehow I had decided years ago that they were boring. So I began with the first of the series, From Doon with Death, which came out in 1964. It was an enjoyable mystery, a just the facts ma'am bare bones detective story, an introduction to Inspector Wexford that didn't reveal much about him.

Unable to find the second novel, Sins of the Fathers (Chief Inspector Wexford Mysteries, No. 2), I moved on to Wolf To The Slaughter. It was dreary and complicated and not very interesting. And Wexford's underling, Inspector Burden, was very annoying with his prim attitude. I didn't finish it.

But then I came across The Veiled One, which was well into the series, first published in 1988, so I abandoned the chronological approach. Inspector Burden is again an unattractive character, judgmental and narrow-minded. When Wexford is hospitalized with injuries, Burden has to take charge of a murder case and determines that one suspect is almost certainly the killer. Despite reservations expressed by both his wife and his boss, Burden sets his sights on extracting a confession from the suspect. This takes an unexpected and curiously satisfying turn.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jean.t on 7 Dec 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another classic from Ruth Rendell , this story involves the murder of a middle aged woman , found in a car park in a shopping centre. Ruth Rendell is a great thriller writer in my opinion , and this book is a very good read, full of suspects and surprising turns.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lintay on 1 Aug 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book was up to the usual standard -very enjoyable.
This author rarely disappoints . Characters well drawn and a pacy plot
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By takingadayoff VINE VOICE on 9 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback
This had every appearance of being a mainstream police procedural that, even if expertly written, would be entertaining for the duration of the time it took to read it, and then be forgotten quickly. Looks can be deceiving.

Recently I resolved to give Ruth Rendell's Wexford novels a fresh look. Somehow I had decided years ago that they were boring. So I began with the first of the series, From Doon With Death, which came out in 1964. It was an enjoyable mystery, a just the facts ma'am bare bones detective story, an introduction to Inspector Wexford that didn't reveal much about him.

Unable to find the second novel, Sins of the Fathers (Chief Inspector Wexford Mysteries, No. 2), I moved on to Wolf To The Slaughter. It was dreary and complicated and not very interesting. And Wexford's underling, Inspector Burden, was very annoying with his prim attitude. I didn't finish it.

But then I came across The Veiled One, which was well into the series, first published in 1988, so I abandoned the chronological approach. Inspector Burden is again an unattractive character, judgmental and narrow-minded. When Wexford is hospitalized with injuries, Burden has to take charge of a murder case and determines that one suspect is almost certainly the killer. Despite reservations expressed by both his wife and his boss, Burden sets his sights on extracting a confession from the suspect. This takes an unexpected and curiously satisfying turn.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search


Feedback