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The Vanishing [1993] [DVD]


Price: £3.79 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Jeff Bridges, Kiefer Sutherland, Nancy Travis, Sandra Bullock, Park Overall
  • Directors: George Sluizer
  • Writers: Todd Graff, Tim Krabbé
  • Producers: Larry Brezner, Lauren Weissman, Paul Schiff, Pieter Jan Brugge, Todd Graff
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Czech, Danish, English, Finnish, Hebrew, Hungarian, Icelandic, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Swedish, Turkish
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Twentieth Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Aug. 2003
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000063VBJ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,913 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Originally based on 'The Golden Egg' by Tim Krabbé, this dark thriller follows Jeff Harriman's (Keifer Sutherland) obsession with finding his girlfriend, Diane Shaver (Sandra Bullock), who was abducted three years before whilst waiting at a road stop. Presented with a series of clues to the disappearance by the abductor himself, a psychotic scientist (Jeff Bridges), Jeff retraces his girlfriend's sinister journey. George Sluizer directs this Hollywood remake of his 1988 feature 'Spoorloos'.

From Amazon.co.uk

It's not unusual for Hollywood to remake European hits. What is unusual is the director of the original getting the chance to helm the new version with an American cast, which is what happened with this film based on an intensely creepy Dutch film of the same name (both directed by George Sluizer). Kiefer Sutherland and Sandra Bullock are on vacation when, while stopped at a crowded rest area, she disappears. He devotes the next several years to discovering what happened to her, ruining his life in the process. When he does get a clue, it leads him to Jeff Bridges, who plays a bizarre and highly organized individual whose motives are almost as strange as he is. Bridges is spooky, but Sluizer ultimately is undone by Hollywood's demand for a happy ending, which makes this film affecting but far less unsettling than the original. --Marshall Fine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By mister joe on 26 April 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The remake of The Vanishing is not all that bad to be honest,but as is the way the original 1988 Vanishing is the superior version but both movies kind of operate at different levels.
As to be expected the remake employs a sanitised Hollywood approach whilst the original basks in its european sensibilities.
The portrayal of a sociopath in the original is truly unnerving,capturing the banality of evil as the abductor test runs his kidnap plan,timing his moves to the second,picking up his daughters,having dinner with the wife....
This monster is far more terrifying to me then a hockey mask wearing kid with a mushy face.Its about total control.
The Vanishing is a taut thriller well worth watching....both versions.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By M. Dale on 6 Oct. 2004
Format: DVD
Please notice that some of the reviews included here are actually of the poor American remake. This is the Dutch original, set in France, and is one of my favourite films. Take out the mistakenly included reviews and this film would presumably get the 5 stars it definitely deserves...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Dec. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Spoorloos (AKA: The Vanishing) is directed by George Sluizer and Sluizer co-adapts the screenplay with Tim Krabbe from Krabbe's own novella The Golden Egg. It stars Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu, Gene Bervoets, Johanna ter Steege and Gwen Eckhaius. Music is by Hennie Vrienten and cinematography by Toni Kuhn.

It's a lesson in creeping unease, a film firmly interested in character development as it unfurls a tale of obsession whilst casting a clinical observation of a sociopath at work. Story is basic on plot terms, young lovers are separated during a vacation when the girl mysteriously disappears. So begins her boyfriend's obsessive search that spans years, then things get intriguing as the person responsible for girls disappearance starts sending the boyfriend messages, giving him the run around, until the question is asked. Just how far are you prepared to go to find out what happened?

The script is brutally clever, we follow two parallel lives, that of emotionally torn boyfriend Rex Hoffman (Bervoets), and that of sociopath Raymond Lemorne (Donnadieu), the latter of which is a family man moving freely amongst his loved ones whilst simultaneously practising his perfect crime. Lemorne is a very different type of sociopath to what normally fills out horror movies, he's sometimes a figure of fun, even inept, but he beats a black heart and as Rex Hoffman is going to find out, he's very methodical in his belief that he was destined to enact a perfect crime.

Sluizer builds the picture very slowly, only turning the screw an inch at a time. He lets Spoorloos chill our blood not by jolt shocks or stalk and slash histrionics, but by the very fact that Raymond does what he does just because he can.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 15 Nov. 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
NB - Once again Amazon have thoughtlessly and unhelpfully contrived to combine the reviews for two different fims on the same page. This review refers to the US remake.

George Sluizer's original Dutch-French version of The Vanishing (aka The Man Who Wanted to Know) offers one of European cinema's most quietly disturbingly anonymous and everyday sociopaths, feeling his way one step at a time towards murder. If you've seen that version, you probably still can't get the final revelation out of your head, but the film had plenty more to offer than that, playing with chronology, subverting the usual cliches of its 'Lady Vanishes' plot (the hero wants to know what happened to his missing lover far more than he wants her to be alive) and throwing in some excellent characterization. I can only assume that for this 1993 US remake Sluizer was so determined that no-one else was going to get the chance to ruin his film when he was perfectly capable of doing it himself, but few people could have anticipated how comprehensively he trashes his own work. His career never recovered.

Chief culprit is an astonishing performance by Jeff Bridges that has been overthought through in every detail to a truly disastrous level. A friend who produced one of his earliest movies noted that Bridges was a great instinctive actor as long as you stopped him thinking about what he was doing, and this film is the proof of the pudding. Every movement is overly mechanical in its precision, making him look like a rusty clockwork toy, while his voice is a bizarre mixture of Tootsie, Latka Gravas from Taxi and a Dalek who have all been taking elocution lessons from Dok-tah E-ville. No banality of evil here, just a looney walking around with an invisible sign over his head saying "Please. Let. Me. Kill. You.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dubious Geebious on 31 Dec. 2009
Format: DVD
I spent sixteen years working as a psychiatric nurse, and this is the best on screen portrayal of antisocial personality disorder (i.e. a psychopath/sociopath) I've ever seen. He's easy to get on with, can affect a certain vulnerability, he's sort of nerdishly charming (not necessarily one of the criteria, but it all helps), very calculating, clearly incapable of remorse or empathy, and only allows himself to be in situations in which he has complete control. He also avoids responsibility by rationalising his behaviour. In short, he's one of cinema's most credible villains. His presence in a film where nothing much actually happens (as opposed to, say, a slasher) makes for a genuinely unsettling experience. And yes, avoid the remake.
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