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The Vanished Man Paperback – 16 Feb 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Coronet; New Ed edition (16 Feb. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340734043
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340734049
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.6 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 107,614 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jeffery Deaver is the Number One bestselling author of thirty-two novels, including the 2011 authorised James Bond thriller, CARTE BLANCHE, three collections of short stories and a non-fiction law book. A former journalist, attorney, and folksinger, he has received or been shortlisted for numerous awards around the world, including Novel of the Year from the International Thriller Writers Association for THE BODIES LEFT BEHIND, the Steel Dagger for Best Thriller from the British Crime Writers' Association, and the British Thumping Good Read Award. He was recently shortlisted for the ITV3 Crime Thriller Award for Best International Author.

His most recent novels are THE OCTOBER LIST, a thriller told in reverse; THE SKIN COLLECTOR, a Lincoln Rhyme novel; and XO, a Kathryn Dance thriller, for which he wrote an album of country-western songs, available on iTunes and as a CD.

You can find out more about Jeffery on his website www.jefferydeaver.com, Facebook page facebook.com/JefferyDeaver, and follow him on Twitter @JefferyDeaver.

Product Description

Amazon Review

When a gifted illusionist turns his hand to violent death, The Vanished Man is only one of a series of classic conjuring tricks that paralysed forensic investigator Lincoln Rhyme finds himself having to understand. More important even than the details of technique which Lincoln and his partner Amelia are taught by young illusionist Kara are the conjuror's habits of mind--misdirection piled on deceit piled on false leads. It is not just sleight of hand that deceives the eye; it is where the eye is tricked into looking. Is the killer who calls himself Malerik just after a sequence of showy violent deaths, or is that what he wants Lincoln to think?

This is an impressive addition to Deaver's much-praised sequence of novels about Lincoln and Amelia simply because they find themselves up against an equally intelligent killer with radically different ways of thinking. Their habits of logic and science and legwork are of limited use against someone who constantly stretches the limits of the improbable. Jeffrey Deaver has always been an ingenious thriller writer and this book returns to the sardonic wit of his earliest work as he too engages in endless trickery and confusion of our expectations. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'The best psychological thriller writer around' - The Times

'The story twists and turns at a cracking pace to reach its craftily plotted conclusion. Another winner from this first-class writer. Highly recommended.' - Hull Daily Mail

'Teeth-chattering suspense' - Daily Mail

'Stunning' Scotsman

'This is Deaver as his followers expect him to be, crackling and compulsive' Publishing News

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Flaton on 24 Mar. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs are back in town, this time to solve a baffling series of crimes committed by a master illusionist with a vengeance and a a double, nay, a triple agenda.
Deaver is, without doubt, the Man with the Master Plot who puts layer upon layer of deceit and illusion, and who sends his reader to all the wrong corners. Forensic science and the world of the great illusionists are coming to together in a whirlwind that leaves the reader (to his or her delight) in utter bewilderness.
But there is also something amiss here. In his earlier novels Deaver was as much interested in the interplay between the protagonists - the quadriplegic Rhyme and his 'eyes on foot', Amelia Sachs - as in plotting and scheming. But the forensic part of their relationship is almost perfunctorily done with here, and their personal interplay doesn't develop at all. In fact, the main protagonist, Kara (an iiluusionist who's helping Rhyme with his investigations), is much more interesting than our heroes, and that leaves this novel rather uneven.
Besides, there is more than an echo of Carol O'Connell's brilliant themes about the world of crime & illusion (i.e. "Shellgame") than I would care to read, and, frankly, O'Connell is much, much better in this area.
Nevertheless, Deaver's latest is highly entertaining and certainly a must for his fans, and so much better than 'The Blue Nowhere'.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Huck Flynn VINE VOICE on 9 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
Deaver's penchant for playing games with his audience gets the better of him just as the Conjuror gets his comeuppance in this convoluted thriller. The mind games, coincidences and plot twists become ridiculous, laughable even - even more camp than Sherlock Holmes' worst excesses. There's no real menace -the trouble with established heroes like rhyme and sachs is that you know they're indestructible, so why use them as targets - deaver should create sympathetic victims and build up menace and tension. Sadly, despite the meticulous research into magic and illusion this sleight piece of escapism turned out to be written for a young teen audience and is very far away from the gripping Bone Collector.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Veronica VINE VOICE on 26 Sept. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Of all the series characters I have read so far I wait for none so eagerly as I do Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs. They are well developed, likeable and utterly original. Lincoln is all bluster and frustration that he is only able to move his head and one finger, and Amelia Sachs is a strong and powerful woman who will try almost anything to solve a crime.
In this story the theme is magic – the people who practise it for both good and evil and how it can be manipulated in many ways. A new character is introduced for this part of the series – a young magicians apprentice called Kara. I really liked this woman and empathised with her.
As usual with Jeffrey Deaver books the plot twists like a snake and keeps you on your toes. The murderer here is an elusive and creative ‘magician’ who sees the murders he commits as performances to his ‘revered audience’. The characters also face new challenges. Amelia, for example, is trying to become a Sergeant and this provides Deaver with the chance to write something very thought provoking and realistic about the way in which bureaucracy is often unfair and biased.
Overall The Vanished Man is a great new instalment in the ongoing Rhyme/Sachs series. I urge anyone who loves crime and is looking for something new and fresh to start with The Bone Collector and work their way through the series. I wait eagerly for the next book and any stand alone fiction Deaver produces
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "catoncharlotte" on 22 April 2003
Format: Hardcover
Those or you who are a fan of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs will love this new novel. It starts when the killer flies the scene of a murder and locks himself in a room. When the police break the door down the killer has vanished. Lincoln and Amelia are then called into solve the mystery and stop the killer before he kills his next victim. I found this book is far better than Deaver lat book the stone monkey. I would recommend, that if you are reading a Lincoln Rhyme novel for the first time you start of by reading the first book in this series The Bone Collector. This book is full of plenty of twists and turns which keep you guessing as to the identity of the killer and is full of clues, magic tricks and plenty of plot twists to keep you engrossed. This by far the best Deaver novel I've ever read. Truly a master piece.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 April 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is Deaver back to his best. Without a doubt his Lincoln Rhyme novels are the most enjoyable, but I'd felt the last 2 ("Empty Chair" and "Stone Monkey") had lacked something and, dare I say, were a bit predictable. In contrast, "Vanished Man" had me instantly gripped and the twists and turns were always surprising and didn't stop coming!
As usual, Deaver's knowledge of the main subject - in this case magic - was researched thoroughly and this increased my enjoyment of the book. He also managed to strike a balance between the amount of coverage given to the crimes vs Rhyme/Sachs relationship, unlike "Empty Chair" which was very relationship focused and "Stone Monkey" which was the opposite.
I could barely put this book down, finished it yesterday and already want to read it again!
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