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The Uplift War Paperback – 7 Aug 1987


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Product details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (Transworld Publishers a division of the Random House Group) (7 Aug. 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553174525
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553174526
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 11.7 x 4.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,517,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Brin is a scientist, public speaker and world-known author. His novels have been New York Times Bestsellers, winning multiple Hugo, Nebula and other awards. At least a dozen have been translated into more than twenty languages.

David's latest novel - Existence - is set forty years ahead, in a near future when human survival seems to teeter along not just on one tightrope, but dozens, with as many hopeful trends and breakthroughs as dangers... a world we already see ahead. Only one day an astronaut snares a small, crystalline object from space. It appears to contain a message, even visitors within. Peeling back layer after layer of motives and secrets may offer opportunities, or deadly peril.

David's non-fiction book -- The Transparent Society: Will Technology Make Us Choose Between Freedom and Privacy? -- deals with secrecy in the modern world. It won the Freedom of Speech Award from the American Library Association.

A 1998 movie, directed by Kevin Costner, was loosely based on his post-apocalyptic novel, The Postman. Brin's 1989 ecological thriller - Earth - foreshadowed global warming, cyberwarfare and near-future trends such as the World Wide Web. David's novel Kiln People has been called a book of ideas disguised as a fast-moving and fun noir detective story, set in a future when new technology enables people to physically be in more than two places at once. A hardcover graphic novel The Life Eaters explored alternate outcomes to WWII, winning nominations and high praise.

David's science fictional Uplift Universe explores a future when humans genetically engineer higher animals like dolphins to become equal members of our civilization. These include the award-winning Startide Rising, The Uplift War, Brightness Reef, Infinity's Shore and Heaven's Reach. He also recently tied up the loose ends left behind by the late Isaac Asimov: Foundation's Triumph brings to a grand finale Asimov's famed Foundation Universe.

Brin serves on advisory committees dealing with subjects as diverse as national defense and homeland security, astronomy and space exploration, SETI and nanotechnology, future/prediction and philanthropy.

As a public speaker, Brin shares unique insights -- serious and humorous -- about ways that changing technology may affect our future lives. He appears frequently on TV, including several episodes of "The Universe" and History Channel's "Life After People." He also was a regular cast member on "The ArciTECHS."

Brin's scientific work covers an eclectic range of topics, from astronautics, astronomy, and optics to alternative dispute resolution and the role of neoteny in human evolution. His Ph.D in Physics from UCSD - the University of California at San Diego (the lab of nobelist Hannes Alfven) - followed a masters in optics and an undergraduate degree in astrophysics from Caltech. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Space Institute. His technical patents directly confront some of the faults of old-fashioned screen-based interaction, aiming to improve the way human beings converse online.

Website: http://www.davidbrin.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/davidbrin1

Product Description

Review

Brin's storytelling abilites come to the fore in THE UPLIFT WAR. He handles a large cast extremely well, and the course of the war is laid out to make a thrilling, nail-biting storyline that moves at neckbreak speed. (VECTOR) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David Brin is a Hugo and Nebula award winning author of twelve novels, holds a doctorate in astrophysics and has served as a consultant for NASA. He lives in California. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Oct. 1998
Format: Paperback
Not a devastating book like Brin's "Earth", but still highly entertaining. The third book in the Uplift series, based upon Earths struggling new place in a galactic civilisation of eons old races. This book strives (and to a large extent succeeds) in adding new ideas to a genre where other others just give up and re-invent. It is entertaining and the characters are deep, lifelike (and often amusing, e.g. Ulthac..). Start with book one (sundiver) though!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bigbird on 27 Jan. 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a stand alone book this is well paced and inventive. Some ideas...such as the use of Patron's Voice...were not fully explored, but maybe we've heard enough of that particular ability in the Dune novels.
As part of a series it doesn't integrate that well with the two that have gone before. There are some references to the 2nd novel but none of the characters feature in this book and one of the clans (Thennanin)seems to be at odds with the characterisation we've been given in previous books.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Howard on 2 Dec. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Have just finished reading Brin's first Uplift trilogy back-to-back. I like and dislike these books in equal measure.

I love the stories themselves, and the imagination behind them. The stories and premises behind these books, and the universe that Brin created, are interesting, entertaining and well worth exploring if you haven't come across them before. The characters are mostly well defined and engaging. Fiben in particular stands out and could easily support another novel. At the opposite end of the spectrum, though, Prathachulthorn is totally unconvincing: a one-dimensional, predictable, cringeworthy cliché that really let the final section of the book down. Purely in terms of the story, I'd give this four stars.

Where things fall down for me is the book itself: the actual text. Firstly the abysmal editing/proof-reading. As with the other two books in this trilogy the text is absolutely riddled with errors: spelling mistakes, punctuation errors, random words italicised where it makes no sense. There are editing errors on every page; the publishers should be ashamed at the quality of the published text. Combined with Brin's choice of phrasing and specific words, which I often found pretentious or contrived, immersion in the book was very hard to come by, despite enjoying the story itself.
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Format: Paperback
A galaxy were each race must be "uplifted" by another race has erupted in a giant war. Fiben Bolger, a neo-chimpanzee, joins the resistance against Garth's evil, feathery invaders: the Guksyu Gubru.
This was a pretty good book, because the characters were mostly interesting, the settings were creative, but the style of writing was a bit hard to understand.
I liked the aliens, which I believed were very creative; the Tymbrimi girl Athaclena made psychic images in the air, and the Gubru were trisexual. However,some of the characters were flat and boring, like the humans. The humans seemed to me like native American Rambos, Robert O'Neagle was a strong muscular character, who shot the invaders with a bow and arrow.
I also liked the settings, which were the forest of Garth, the Galactic library institute, the Gubru detention camp, and the Thennanin battle cruisers. These settings were extremely creative, and I appreciate the extra effort Brin has taken to make them more original. The vines in the forest, form a network of nutrient exchange. This setting allowed the terragens army to spreed hemoglobin throughout the forest, so that it could confuse its enemy.
Some people may have a hard time with the transitions because every chapter is from a different person's/alien's point of view. Also, the situation may be extremely strange, and alien, that tyou must read the first paragraph or twice, to understand what is going on. That is something I disliked throughout the book; that Brin doesn't take the time to explain what the is going on. A chapter is about a battle with the Gubru, and the next is saying how the Suzerain of beam and talon was pouting over how he was going to be the prince of the triumvirate, and how he was so close to being the queen.
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Format: Paperback
"The Uplift War" was the third book in the original "Uplift" hard science fiction trilogy, which was followed by a second trilogy a few years later.

Although I think it reads slightly better if you have read one or both of the earlier two books in the series first, this book will stand on its own.

Virtually the whole of this story is set on a planet called "Garth" which is an earth colony whose population consists of a few humans, a rather larger number of "uplifted" neo-chimpanzees - bio-engineered to be fully sentient - and a handful of illegally present gorillas.

In the previous book, the earth spaceship "Streaker", commanded and largely crewed by dolphins, accidentally touched off an intergalactic war by discovering the long-lost remains of fifty thousand ancient and gigantic spaceships which have been lying derelict in space for billions of years.

As soon as Streaker transmitted a message indicating what they had found, war broke out all over our galaxy and the four neighbouring ones. All the major powers jumped to the conclusion that these ships may have belonged to the legendary "Progenitors" who founded the civilisation of the five galaxies, and most of them are willing to go to any lengths to grab Streaker's information or force Earth to surrender it. The only thing which gives Streaker, humanity, or earth colonies like Garth a chance of survival as everything goes to hell in a handcart, is that all the major powers go to war with each other as well as with us.

Garth is invaded by an overwhelming force of Gubru, a senior galactic "Patron" race who are large trisexual birds. They are hoping to use the colonists as hostages to force the Terragens Council which runs Earth to hand over information from "Streaker.
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