The Unseen 1981

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Release date: Not currently released

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(8) IMDb 5.1/10
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Three beautiful television reporters stay in a strange house with an even stranger couple on an assignment in California. Their stay becomes a horrific nightmare in this tense psycho thriller when one by on they encounter the unseen!

Starring:
Barbara Bach, Stephen Furst
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 30 minutes
Starring Barbara Bach, Stephen Furst
Director Danny Steinmann, Peter Foleg
Genres Horror
Studio PRISM LEISURE
Rental release Not currently released
Main languages English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
This item has not been released yet and is not eligible to be reviewed.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Oct 2003
Format: DVD
One of the most creepy and disturbing horror films that i have ever seen. It's absolutely fantastic. Not a very big film for some reason but a very memorable one. Three sexy female news reporters, after discovering there is absolutely no accomodation for them in a town, agree to stay in a seemingly charming little mans huge house. As the film goes on, it becomes clear that him and his wierd wife have a terrible secret. In some of the most disturbing scenes in movie history, that secret is revealed.
The little man (i don't know the actors name) gives a truly terrifying performance and the rest of the cast are good too.
I strongly recommend that you immediately see this film. Watch it alone with all the lights off. You'll have nightmares for weeks!
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Jennifer Fast, a news reporter, sets off to cover a parade in a small town along with her sister, Karen, and a friend, Vicki. Due to some mix-up, the room at a hotel they believed they had, isn't available. In desperation, they drive around and find a run-down hotel just outside of town, but soon discover that it hasn't been used as a hotel for some time and is now a museum. The strange owner of the museum, Ernest Keller, takes pity on the women and offers them a room at his farmhouse. The girls accept Ernest's offer and then meet his "wife", who seems far stranger than he does. Accepting Ernest's offer is the worst mistake they could have made, as something unseen is lurking in the basement.

Barbara Bach is okay as Jennifer, she does everything she needed to do without really impressing. She's good, but I found her performance a little flat. Bach is best known as a Bond girl and for being the wife of Ringo Starr, but I know her far better for her regular appearances in Italian genre movies throughout the '70s. Black Belly of the Tarantula, Short Night of Glass Dolls and Street Law being the best, Island of the Fishmen which was later called Screamers with added gore scenes and Big Alligator River are also fun. Bach hasn't been in a film now since '86. Karen Lamm is also only okay as her sister, Karen. Lamm was supposedly abusing drugs quite heavily at the time. Lamm was a decent actress and appeared in the massively underrated Trackdown, and the TV movie, Ants. She only ever appeared in one more thing after making The Unseen, she was in an episode of The Dukes of Hazzard four years later. She died in 2001 aged just 49.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Green Man Music on 28 July 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I bought this wanting a cheapo horror film to watch one night, and was expecting a rubbishy laugh. But in actual fact this turned out to be a wee gem. The formula isn't anything new, and although the film's creepy build-up is eventually let down by the last few scenes and the more mainstream ending, the actor that plays the guy from the museum is top notch. Scarier than I though it would be, and I'll be keeping my purchase :)
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Format: Blu-ray
The Unseen managed to be released during the early 80's slasher craze and yet it avoids all the cliches of the genre, this obscure and rare hidden gem also does not have any gore, in fact its bloodless however it does have alot of suspense and the atmosphere was terrific and there was one great death scene involving an air vent and a stuck scarf. Three beautiful women reporters (played by former Bond girl Barbara Bach, Karen Lamm and Lois Young) venture to the town of Solvang somewhere in California where the locals are holding a festival to celebrate their Danish ancestry. Unable to find a hotel with a vacancy, the three women accept the offer of a room for the night from Ernest Keller, a kooky museum curator (Sydney Lassick) who also shares his large, creepy house with his depressed sister Virginia (Lelia Goldoni), but there seems to be someone else lurking around the house, and soon this dark secret kept in the basement will be revealed. The Unseen by Danny Steinmann is remarkably deranged and quite unique horror flick with lovely Barbara Bach in the main role. The acting of Sydney Lassick and Stephen Furst as the deformed man in the basement is marvelously twisted too. Avoiding the standard "vice and violence" ingredients of the genre, The Unseen instead draws its suspense from a narrative and aesthetic approach which ties its lineage straight to Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. The deal is sealed with some truly impressive acting. Sydney Lassick plays Ernest Keller like a drunken, sweaty, fat relative of Norman Bates (coincidentally, Lassick is a perfect physical match for the Norman Bates described in Robert Bloch's novel). Like Anthony Perkins' seminal momma's boy, we know there's something off about Ernest the moment we see him.Read more ›
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