The Tunnel and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Tunnel has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: COVER MAY SHOW SIGN OF WEAR OTHERWISE GOOD CONDITION.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Tunnel Paperback – 28 Apr 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£3.04 £2.80
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Tunnel + El Tunel (Letras Hispanicas)
Price For Both: £17.14

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.29
Trade in The Tunnel for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.29, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (28 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141194545
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141194547
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 0.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 137,766 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'An existentialist classic ... Retains a chilling, memorable power' (The New York Times Book Review)

'Sabato captures the intensity of passions run into uncharted passages where love promises not tranquillity, but danger' (Los Angeles Times)

Heralded by Albert Camus and Thomas Mann and widely translated, ''The Tunnel'' is the brief, obsessive, sometimes delirious confession of a convicted murderer. (Robert Coover New York Times Book Review)

About the Author

Ernesto Sabato (b. June 24, 1911) was born in Rojas, a small town in Buenos Aires Province. He read physics at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, attended the Sorbonne in Paris, and worked at the Curie Institute. After World War II, he lost faith in science and began writing fiction.

Margaret Sayers Peden is Professor of Spanish American Literature at the University of Missouri. One of the leading translators of her time, Peden has translated more than 40 books and has won numerous prizes and grants.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley TOP 100 REVIEWER on 29 May 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This was Ernesto Sabato's first novel, originally published in 1948. It is now being re-published as a Penguin Classic and is certainly deserving of the word `classic'. This is basically the story of Juan Pablo Castel, an artist whose passions run very deep into very dark places. He starts his tale by admitting to killing the one person who truly understood his art and by extension him too.
It is then a monologue of him recounting how he met her, fell in obsessive love with her and how the tragedy reaches its' inevitable conclusion. This is a masterful work, but it is not an easy read and despite giving it the deserved five stars, which comes up as `I love it', I found i did not love it, but admired it. The story is too destructive, self obsessed and dark to be able to be loved. That then is the strength; Sabato has placed himself in the scary world of Castel and takes us on every twist and turn in this man's mind, to be able to justify his actions. Castel is a vividly unlikable man who looks down on everyone around him and sees artifice and cunning where none exists. This is possibly where he projects his own crooked ways of thinking onto everyone else.

He was praised by Albert Camus amongst others and I can see why as he truly gets under the skin of his creation and is flawless in his analytical approach, much like Camus. It was published as `El Tunel' which has been translated as The Tunnel or The Outsider, as you near the end you will see why `The Tunnel' is far more apt.

This is a short but not an easy read - what does work though is it stays with you for a long while after reading like `Heart of darkness' by Joseph Conrad and as such is an essential novel. I hope that with this re release that his work might find a new audience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 May 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
When we meet the artist Jan Pablo Castel, at the beginning of this book, he is already in prison for the murder of Maria Iribarne. During the novel, Castel recounts the story of how he met and murdered Maria. He is first drawn to her at an exhibition, where she is staring at his painting, "Motherhood". Most people seem to ignore the tiny scene, framed in the left hand corner of the canvas, but for him it contains the meaning of the work. Seeing her attention focused on this, Castel is under the impression that this woman understands him and his work and he obsesses about her for months, dreaming up bizarre meetings between them. When he sees her by chance, on the street, he follows her into an office building and confronts her about the window in the painting. Then begins a series of meetings, usually punctuated by Castel becoming either enraged, jealous or argumentative, and leaving.

Castel begins a bizarre relationship with Maria, which is one sided and delusional. He stalks her and she seems unable to distance himself - nor are we sure she wants to. During the course of the book, Castel rants and rages in a frightening way and, of course, we know the outcome of the relationship. This is actually a very disturbing book and remarkably well written. During the novel, we see and hear everything from Castel's point of view and, although you never emphasise with him, you can understand his point of view in a terrifying way. This is a very powerful novel and would make an excellent book club choice, with much to discuss.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By P. McCauley VINE VOICE on 29 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
There is something contagious about the artist Castel's compulsions in this dark novel. He paints for a living but cannot abide the thought of being part of any kind of "set" or "clique" of artists. And he can't just let this be, he needs you to understand it, or rather he needs to explain it to you. He tells us on the first page that he killed María Iribarne, but before delving into his story he must first explain that he is not writing out of any kind of arrogance or desire for fame. This convicted murderer fears being accused of vanity.

Despite all of this, as Castel tells the tale of his doomed love affair with María, it is difficult not to sympathise with the disturbed artist who sits for hours in a cafe on the off chance that a woman he has seen twice happens to work in the building across the street. He spends days obsessing over tiny details and when he speaks them aloud as concrete accusations they fail to make any impression; if anything they fall feebly to the floor. His one desire is to connect, or at the very least to feel another life line running parallel to his, but his mind is overrun with complications, suspicions and jealousies that constantly threaten his sanity. The tragic ending is made clear in the first few lines and yet the story remains compelling throughout.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Richards VINE VOICE on 5 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is the first book I have read by Ernesto Sabato, and based on this book, he is one author I will definatley be reading more of in future.

Ernesto Sabato has written a book is a shear pleasure to read; its a book that is very well written, is thought provoking and makes you both like and fear his main character, Juan pablo Castel. The book is written in the form of a "confession" or "reflection" by Castel in regards to his relationship with a girl he meets at an art exhibition named Maria and how he ultimatley ends up in jail for her murder. However to say this is a simple "reflection" would be a great injustice as Sabato has written a book that is both tragic and gripping and he's written it in such a way that you empathise, or at least understand Castel's actions even when they seem absurd or even at times quite demented. I have never read another book where I have had such divided opinions of a main character (in a good way) and its little surprise that this book is considered a "modern classic". The city of Buenos Aires - especilaly certain parts of it like Recoleta and Plaza San Martin, give this story a very nice backdrop too.

The overall quality of this translation from the original spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden is excellent, and both the tone and pace of the novel make it very accessable and easy to read without taking away from the Novel's impact on the reader. However, there are one or two times when this English translation is not quite as it should be - E.g. "I lighted a cigarette", but overall this is quite a rare feature in the book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback