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The Truth about You & Me Paperback – 15 Oct 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Flux (15 Oct. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738736244
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738736242
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.5 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,597,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Smart girls aren't supposed to do stupid things. On her first day at Green River Community College, Madelyn Hawkins meets Bennett Cartwright, her biology professor. He's funny. He's interested. And he has no idea that Madelyn is only sixteen. When they're together, Madelyn feels more alive than she's ever felt before. And she knows Bennett feels the same way. She also knows that if she tells him her real age, their relationship will be over. So Madelyn makes a simple decision.She won't tell him. Praise: "Grace...treats delicate issues with honesty and control."--PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Truth About You and Me is not what I expected. I thought it was going to be another good YA romance about forbidden love. However, what I got was a coming of age story that left me broken hearted.

It is told by Maddie writing letters to Bennett and retelling us everything that happened between them. I don't think I have read any books told this way. It was so refreshing and I think gives the reader a more personal connection to Maddie. Maddie is only sixteen but she is at college through a Running Start programme. She falls for Bennett her biology professor and in return Bennett starts falling for her. But he thinks Maddie is eighteen/nineteen. Now, Maddie I did like her. I found her such a refreshing character. She isn't perfect and I like that. Bennett oh Bennett. Such a sweetheart. He is lovely. I felt for him so much because he didn't know Maddie was only sixteen. He just thought their relationship was forbidden because of the professor/student situation. So the suspense was killing me just waiting for the truth to unravel.

When I first started reading this, I couldn't get into it straight away. There is a slow build but after about 20% in I was hooked and couldn't put it down. I was drawn into Maddie's story. Wanting more and more. Rooting for this couple. I sometimes forget that when I read these kind of stories that the age of consent is usually 18 in the States. Here in Scotland it is 16 so at times I didn't really feel the forbidden love aspect until I reminded myself that 16 is sometimes illegal in America. Just depending on the State.

The Truth About You and Me is a book I am highly recommending that you pre-order. It was such a captivating, consuming and emotional read.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Review originally published on my blog, StudentSpyglass.com

Maddie Hawkins is a 16 year old in a fast track programme, attending some college classes early. Whilst there she meets, and falls in love with, Bennett…her teacher. Afraid of owning up to the fact she’s only 16, she deliberately avoids mentioning her age to Bennett, who nonetheless says they have to wait until he’s no longer her teacher, regardless of the fact he believes she’s of age.

The Truth About You and Me had the misfortune to be read very soon after I first read Drowning Instinct. I say unfortunately, because I really liked Drowning Instinct so I had really high hopes for The Truth About You and Me. While I didn’t dislike The Truth About You and Me, it didn’t live up to my hopes, and I found it virtually impossible not to draw comparisons between it and Drowning Instinct, which I much preferred.

The Truth About You and Me is written in the format of letters from Maddie to Bennett, in second person, so it reads as if you are Bennett. It’s an unusual format, and I really liked the novelty at first. Unfortunately, once the novelty began to wear off, the format didn’t really work for me. The past-tense letter format made it a little more difficult to get really caught up in the story, because it’s hard to feel any urgency. There’s an awful lot of telling rather than showing, which makes it hard to get lost in the story. The second person format also began to feel a little awkward at times, because Maddie’s telling Bennett about events he would have known about (having been there).

Maddie was ultimately a frustrating character. She’s pushed academically by her parents, and we’re told often how smart she is. Unfortunately, that just didn’t come across to me.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Caroline for [...]
Copy via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

We are told from the very first page that Madelyn's relationship has completely broken down, what follows is the letters of a emotionally immature girl, as she tries to explain and justify her lies and omissions in pursuit of a relationship. A relationship which nearly destroys the life of the man she professes to love.

The Truth About You And Me was a difficult book for me in that I just could't gel with the protagonist, Madelyn. It wasn't that I was unsympathetic for desire for unconditional acceptance (ironic given how many lies she tells) and affection, It was that I was much more sympathetic for Bennett. I found myself racing through the book in order to learn the fate of this chronically naive man.

Verdict: A compelling and quick read.
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Format: Kindle Edition
(Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Flux Books and Netgalley.)
16-year-old Madelyn is taking fast-track courses to get her through college early. She's always been a brilliant student, and her father always pushes her to try harder, achieve more, and aim high.
On her first day of classes though, she meets her new biology teacher - Bennett.
He's gorgeous, and they're instantly attracted to each other, so when they bump into each other while hiking on the following Saturday, they start talking and hit it off. One hiking trip turns into more, and dinner, but Bennett tells her that he won't kiss her until December 17th, when she's no longer his student.
Bennett and Madelyn keep their relationship private, and wait on December.
Can Bennett and Madelyn really be together though? How long will it be until Bennett finds out the truth? And how long can Madelyn keep up the charade of being eighteen?

This was an okay story about a 16-year-old girl who starts a relationship with her teacher, but I kinda felt like it was nothing new, it had all been done before, and my attention waned.

Madelyn was an okay character, but how dumb do you have to be to know that having a relationship with your teacher is a bad idea, not to mention lying about your age? Even if he hadn't been her teacher, pretending to be 18 when you are actually 16 is not going to last for very long, eventually he would find out her deception and everything would be over.
Madelyn obviously had some issues with the way that her parents pushed her to be fabulous all the time, but I didn't really see how having a relationship with her teacher really helped her with this.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 39 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Mesmerizing and Bittersweet 18 Aug. 2013
By Alise (Readers in Wonderland) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I absolutely loved THE TRUTH ABOUT YOU AND ME. I was a bit discouraged after all the negative reviews I had been seeing but now must disagree with the majority of them. Everything about this book, even the flaws, just made the story enjoyable and leaves you thinking.

Madelyn is attending college classes even though she is only sixteen. This is how she meets Bennett Cartwright, who seems perfect, except for the fact he is her Biology professor. Maddie builds their relationship on lies, lies about her age. Of course, the truth comes out eventually. Unknowing his fate, Maddie begins writing a letter to him, to them, hoping it will help clear his name.

The way this was written absolutely mesmerized me, Maddie is writing a letter to Bennett but it never felt like just a letter. It still felt like their story, just way more personalized and in a way you can almost imagine yourself being there with Maddie through all her experiences. It just made the story all the more real and I definitely found myself smiling. However, the writing style is definitely not for everyone, as it is akin to second person.

Surprisingly, this was written in such a way that doesn't make Bennett seem like a creepy older guy taking advantage of a (unbeknown to him) younger girl, which could have been really easy to do. It really was fate, and a little scheming on Maddie's part, that brought them together.

Many readers will appreciate the ending of this one. It is bittersweet, although it was sad, it is the most realistic ending one could hope for and I am very happy with it.

If you are a fan of forbidden love stories and cute contemporary novels, I recommend this.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Really interesting style, but that main character is a doozy 7 July 2014
By Rachel @ Paper Cuts blog - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Truth About You and Me is a hard one for me. I can't say it was enjoyable, but I also can't say I didn't like certain aspects. I can't completely hate Madelyn (though it's close), but I sure can want to slap her. I'm in a weird zone on this one. It's an interesting book, but just not one that I can say I liked or will ever want to reread.

For one, the way The Truth About You and Me is written is just really cool. It's written as letters from Madelyn to Bennett after their relationship has been ended and discovered. You know that disaster is coming, and the letters betray that foreboding tone, but you just want to see how, why. It's also all Madelyn's voice, so she's up front about why she did things. It didn't make me like her any better, because she's so willingly doing what she knows she shouldn't, what could get Bennett in trouble, but it's still helpful to see what she says.

And that's the thing. I think the format is supposed to make you sympathize with Madelyn, see why she does what she does. But it really doesn't. If anything, it made me dislike her more. Without being so in her head, I might not have known how aware she was that what she was doing was wrong and how she knew she needed to tell Bennett she's sixteen, but I did. Every time she mentioned either thing it was just like a slap in the face, saying, "The things I want are more important than the welfare of anyone else." She loves Bennett, yet she does so much to hurt him, knowing how it will affect him. That certainly sounds like love to me, right? Smart girls may do stupid things at times, but most have enough sense not to ruin the lives of others.

So while I see some interesting things going on in the book, I just can't get past Madelyn. I not only didn't like her, but I couldn't even see her point of view. I know love seems like the biggest thing in the world at that age, but it doesn't mean you destroy lives--especially so willingly.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An okay story about a 16-year-old girl who has a relationship with her teacher. 13 Nov. 2013
By Sarah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
(Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Flux Books and Netgalley.)
16-year-old Madelyn is taking fast-track courses to get her through college early. She's always been a brilliant student, and her father always pushes her to try harder, achieve more, and aim high.
On her first day of classes though, she meets her new biology teacher - Bennett.
He's gorgeous, and they're instantly attracted to each other, so when they bump into each other while hiking on the following Saturday, they start talking and hit it off. One hiking trip turns into more, and dinner, but Bennett tells her that he won't kiss her until December 17th, when she's no longer his student.
Bennett and Madelyn keep their relationship private, and wait on December.
Can Bennett and Madelyn really be together though? How long will it be until Bennett finds out the truth? And how long can Madelyn keep up the charade of being eighteen?

This was an okay story about a 16-year-old girl who starts a relationship with her teacher, but I kinda felt like it was nothing new, it had all been done before, and my attention waned.

Madelyn was an okay character, but how dumb do you have to be to know that having a relationship with your teacher is a bad idea, not to mention lying about your age? Even if he hadn't been her teacher, pretending to be 18 when you are actually 16 is not going to last for very long, eventually he would find out her deception and everything would be over.
Madelyn obviously had some issues with the way that her parents pushed her to be fabulous all the time, but I didn't really see how having a relationship with her teacher really helped her with this. I think Madelyn could have really done with a bit of a reality check in this book, and she really needed to consider that it wasn't just her own life that she was messing up.

Bennett was also in need of some home truths. Even if Madelyn had been 18, she was still his student, even after class had finished, and he really should have known better than to even consider a relationship with her. Just because you haven't physically been together, doesn't mean that you don't have a relationship, and this was obviously a lot more than a normal student-teacher relationship.
He confessed to Madelyn about how his previous relationship ended, and told her that he was waiting for the rug to be pulled out from underneath him again, and whilst I thought that it was pretty poor of Madelyn to not tell him what she was hiding at this point, he was also pretty dense to not see how easily the rug could be pulled out from under him by dating his student! I mean, seriously! You are both as bad as one another!

The storyline in this book was okay, but again, I felt like there was nothing new. I must have read quite a few books where a student has a relationship with her teacher, I mean, it was a storyline in Dawson's Creek in 1998 when Pacey slept with his English teacher even (I love Pacey!), but I just didn't feel that this was anything new at all. Whiney misunderstood 16-year-old lies about her age, and has secret rendezvous' with her teacher, they get caught, the end. It wasn't even like the romance was so good that it made up for the lack of other storylines, the whole thing was just mediocre for me.
I also think that people might have trouble with the way this story is written. It's written in the form of a letter to Bennett from Madelyn, and it's all past-tense, recounting what happened between them, all `you said', `you did', `you thought', with quite a lot of rambling, and a pretty slow pace. I really thought that we would get more than we actually got with this story, which was really disappointing.
The ending was also just okay. The storyline played out exactly as expected, although we did then get a little bit at the end which was `2 years later', which let us know what happened after all this came out. If anything this little epilogue was a bit sad really.
Overall; an okay story about a 16-year-old girl who has a relationship with her teacher.
6.5 out of 10.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Once Upon a Twilight.com Reviews 10 Sept. 2013
By Once Upon a Twilight - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Truth About You And Me is a story, written in letter form, told by Madelyn, a sixteen year old girl who falls in love with her college professor, twenty six year old Bennet. Madelyn is in a special program at her high school that allows her to take college classes. She is the smart, safe girl her parents push her to be. And then she meets Bennet her first day at college. She falls in love with him, and although he respects that he is her professor he thinks she's eighteen. And so begins the impossible relationship between them. The story is told by Madelyn, as a letter she is writing to Bennet about what happened, and why.

Although we know the outcome from the beginning this still was a very interesting read. I was very absorbed by the story. I wanted to see what happened between Madelyn and Bennet. I both liked and disliked the main character, Madelyn. I think knowing she was sixteen really put my mind into stereotype mode and I thought "she's really young, and immature." She did seem mature at times, but the way she handled things were in a way a teenager would handle it. I also felt bad for her, I can't imagine having parents push and push and push me to do better and strive for better. I wasn't too happy with the ending, yet I wasn't too disappointed with it. I felt like they should have had more complicated consequences.

This book kept me interested the entire time. It is a taboo subject and I was engrossed. I am not sure if I've ever read a book in letter form, and I have to say that I really loved it. Amanda Grace's writing was great! If you're looking for an interesting, fast read that will keep you glued from start to finish then read The Truth About You And Me. - Bianca
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
When Wrong Feels So Right 11 Feb. 2014
By TheLostBookReports - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
As Reviewed on The Lost Book Reports

As I began reading The Truth About You & Me, I was impressed by how beautifully written the story was and how Grace/Hubbard could take a taboo subject and give it a realistic twist. Reading Madelyn's letters to Bennett is very moving and even though you can see where the story is heading, you desperately want it to end well. Amanda Grace gives readers a beautiful story, with a satisfying twist and ending, that will give you the closure you need, all while being realistic. The Truth About You & Me is a very quick read, worth reading on a summer afternoon at the park or on a rainy day snuggled by the fire.
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