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on 5 May 2014
I bought it on Thomas Sowell's reccommendation here: [...] and it didn't disappoint, very enlightening and inspiring. It's about a culture's role in the economic and academic success of it's members.

It seems also, that many stereotypes about these groups are accurate! What is true in America is true in Britain also to a large extent. The big one for me is simply that Chinese and Indian kids are studying up to 4 times as much as natural-born citizens, and as a result, are leaving them for dust in school tests and in the job market.

It's too bad they are having to waste time in interviews defending the book against charges of racism. Absolutely idiotic. I can't imagine anyone who has a bad word to say about this book has actually read it!

There is about 100 pages of footnotes from academic studies and data-sets, the entire book in fact, is merely the explanation of the data they have discovered- and it's the right one.
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on 19 September 2014
Examines three qualities that the authors believe propel certain cultural groups to disproportionate achievement: Namely: A superiority complex; Insecurity; Impulse control. They also explore how these same traits that can boost success can also carry deep pathologies, when taken too far, can have toxic effects. Extensive referenced (over 80 pages) and largely based on American experience. Full of issues that merit wider discussion but the key issue is how different individuals and cultures define success in the first place.
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on 8 January 2015
Boring beyond the first 3 chapters. It turns into a commentary about how jews, asians and some other cultures have cultural tendencies that tend towards becoming successful. Its full of historical references and anecdotes, but feels like a padded out thesis.
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on 15 June 2016
The case is quite well made. Some attitudes will help an individual towards success, and if those attitudes exist widely amongst a group, then that group will fare well, and better than those groups that don't have those attitudes.

Several examples are given: Indians, Jews, Lebanese, in America (and other countries). And the third generation of those immigrant groups do less well because they have 'made it', and no longer have one of the attitudes - namely the chip on the shoulder.

The examples are quite convincing, and the reason the third generation does not do so well ties in the initial argument.

The book, however, is a bit of a drag; it stretches the argument out, and it is hard to remain interested. I thought the thesis would have made and interesting article in a Sunday newspaper. To stretch it into a whole book is difficult (even if the bibliography and notes make up a quarter of the book - I did not bother to read that part).

Interesting thesis. Development too long.
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on 23 November 2015
I bought this book in the naïve belief that the information it contained would in some way provide an answer to the question, "How can I be better?"
Unfortunately it more or less told me that as I had no inferiority complex and no superiority complex, then my only 'answer' was the imposition of impulse control - which unfortunately I already knew, as do most people, even if we don't execute it.
I think perhaps I was looking for something like an extension of Stephen Covey's Three Resolutions from his book Principle Centered Leadership, and this wasn't it.
So if you like academic, sociological reads, enjoy.
If you're looking for something you can utilise yourself, go elsewhere.
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on 26 April 2014
Fascinating, thought provoking and firmly grounded in empirical evidence - utterly brilliant. It throws a spotlight on the importance of effort and motivation. I have recommended it to everyone I know. TL
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on 27 February 2014
I think there is more at work than the triple package, so the conclusions are oversimplified, even if the triple package is of major importance. In particular, some cultures have esteem for education independent of the triple package, deriving from circumstances in the distant past, before people of those cultures immigrated to the USA. Hence, in the USA, esteem for education often may not be a dependent variable. I also think that Kid Culture is a major factor affecting an individual's entry onto the road to success. In the modern world remarkable aspects of culture are age-stratified rather than stratified by class, geography, religion or ethnic origin. Kid Culture may be very powerful, and may negate cultural features from those other sources.
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on 13 June 2014
One of the best books I've read.
Very informative. Reveals why certain ethnic groups perform better than others without being offensive or condescending.
Very practical and am currently using the suggestions within my own family.
I cannot reccommend it highly enough.
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on 6 August 2014
Very informative book and an excellent read. A lot of research has gone onto obtaining facts. The historical and cultural references are fascinating.
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on 9 October 2015
Very nice product
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