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The Trellis and the Vine: The Ministry Mind-Shift That Changes Everything Paperback – Dec 2009

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Product details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Matthias Media (Dec. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1921441585
  • ISBN-13: 978-1921441585
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 1.4 x 23.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 180,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John Brand on 3 Sept. 2011
The Trellis and The Vine

I have to confess that I became increasingly frustrated as I read this book. Frustrated because I wished I had read it when I was starting out in pastoral ministry 30 years ago and also because what is advocated here is so glaringly obvious and biblical that I wondered why I hadn't seen it more clearly myself.

The basic premise of the book is that "our goal is not to grow churches but to make disciples". However, such is the traditional model of church and pastoral ministry that we have become accustomed to, that nothing less than a complete "ministry mind-shift" will be required to get us back on course.

Marshall and Payne use the simple but powerful analogy of the relationship between the trellis - which is the framework and support - and the vine - which is the living organism which grows on it. The problem is that most of our energies and agendas as local churches are targetted at the framework (church) rather than the organism (people/disciples) and, say the writers, we need to shift "away from erecting and maintaining structures, and towards growing people who are disciple-making disciples of Christ.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Evans on 25 Sept. 2010
I found this book immensely helpful. It is full of good, simple, practical advice. It's an excellent reminder that ministry is about helping individuals to grow in Christ and in turn disciple others and that the church should be supporting that and also setting the tone and framework through the preaching.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gontroppo on 27 Sept. 2011
The ministry mind-shift that changes everything is the audacious subtitle which Col Marshall and Tony Payne chose for their 2009 book The Trellis and The Vine. I don't know how other readers reacted to it, but it made me sit up and take notice. It also led me to wonder if they would be able to substantiate their promise.

The story begins with Col telling us about his beautiful, carefully preserved trellis with no vine, and his luxuriant jasmine vine, covering a rather ramshackle, disappearing structure that may once have looked like a trellis.
Throughout the book, the authors develop their theme that churches can be like the two trellises in his garden. Some of them are quite beautiful trellises, but there is no vine to be seen. Others have growth, without any structure, which is still necessary if the vine is to stay alive and grow.

As expected, it wasn't hard to describe the problems that many churches face. All too often we are busy with structures, but we aren't growing Christ's church: just running meetings, keeping the building in good order, collecting and distributing money and doing the many things that are thought to be essential parts of running a church in the twenty first century.
We may also be looking after people by visiting those who are sick or suffering, conducting weddings and funerals and getting the congregation involved in church meetings and small group, but Marshall and Payne point out that this is not our main function, which they say should be making genuine disciple-making disciples of Jesus.

In their view, training people to train others is growing the vine; everything else is trellis-work.
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