The Tree Of Life 2011

Amazon Instant Video

(172) IMDb 6.7/10
Available in HD

The story centres around a family with three boys in the 1950s. The eldest son witnesses the loss of innocence.

Starring:
Brad Pitt, Sean Penn
Runtime:
2 hours 18 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

The Tree Of Life

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Instant Video.

Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Drama, Science Fiction, Indie & Arthouse
Director Terrence Malick
Starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn
Supporting actors Jessica Chastain, Fiona Shaw, Kari Matchett, Joanna Going, Jennifer Sipes
Studio Twentieth Century Fox
BBFC rating Suitable for 12 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bob Vernon on 1 April 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
The difference between Art and Entertainment is that Art demands something of the viewer. This is a very demanding film and many have refused the demand. For those who do respond it rewards with a new narrative style, visual beauty, and profound (and challenging) theological insight into the value and cost of human life. I have shown this movie 14 times to friends and still cannot take my eyes from the screen.
Chastain glows and Pitt gives his best ever performance, achingly true,
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Hud on 17 Dec 2013
Format: DVD
Beautiful. I'm trying to think if there is another film-maker who has tried to use film as a simulcra of what life might be about? Perhaps Wenders?

To the naysayers I think I understand. It isn't an easy pop-corn munching movie to watch. Throw away the pop-corn.

I loved it, but it doesn't work as a family movie, but a personal one. Every trivial detail of Brad Pitt's family resonate with my own childhood.

The sequence from big bang to life is breath-taking. The sounds of life from all around you in 5.1 or 7.1 are tremendous, the audio experience is a glorious delight.

At the beginning of the movie it asks you to play the DVD loud. So I did, very loud. Regretably for many people this film only works on large screens with the very best audio fidelity, or a suitably equipped home cinema system with a large screen and excellent speakers.

Tremendous achievement Mr Malick.

Comment: I note another review mentioned the religious symbolism - but though there was some it didn't make an impact on me - the gathering at the end was an allegory, almost a deep wish that we all re-unite at the end of it all, as the 1-god-religions try so hard to make us believe - but an atheist will take away a far deeper meaning from this film because they will see more clearly the accident that is our universe.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Movie Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER on 6 Aug 2013
Format: DVD
The Tree of Life ironically deals with the topic of death. The film tells you to turn up the sound so you can hear all the first person narration. When their son dies at the age of 19 parents cope with the loss and question their faith, but not severely question their faith that would alter their life style. After the characters are introduced, we still see Sean Penn doesn't own a comb. The film digresses into a Discovery Channel special which condenses the modern version of creation of 14.7 billion years into about 12 minutes. I felt like we had passed into the monolith.

We now start all over with the birth of the children. Hey, we already know one dies. There are things that are whispered. These are meant to be ideas or questions for God. Brad Pitt metaphorically represents the "tough love" God who prepares us for life's journey without us realizing it. Hence we have the macrocosm and microcosm in our tale. One could assume that the microcosm of our life is reflective of our theological views, we carve out a tough love God based upon our tough love "Father". At one point in the movie Brad Pitt insists his son call him "Father" and never "Dad." Having lived in the south, that is a no-no. "Father" is reserved for the heavenly Father. That is a hint of the symbolism. A sermon stresses the book of Job and asks, "Is the scheme of life a fraud?"

Not for everyone. I was very bored until I figured out what they were attempting to do. I think the beauty of the film is that different people can grasp a different meaning from it. It doesn't spell it out. My review is one take.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 2 Sep 2011
Format: DVD
Given the awards that this film has won, and the glowing reviews that I read everywhere, I was expecting a masterpiece of cinematography with a complex and moving central message told with a unique style. I jumped at the chance to go and see it in the cinema and really wish that I hadn't.

To give credit where it is due, the film is in places visually absolutely stunning. The cinematography is indeed superb and worth of praise. The main problem for me was the film's message. Malick doesn't really have a lot to say, and takes an awfully long time to say it. The central story around which Malick hangs his message is that of a young boy growing up in mid fifties America, and his relationship with his bullying father and angelic mother. At some point the boy's brother dies, and we see images of his 1950's youth mixed with present day images of him still coming to terms with his childhood. All this is shown in a fractured timeframe with little logical order. Interspersed with all of this are images of the creation of the universe and earth, the evolution of life and images of a possible god like entity. The ending is just downright odd, with some sort of mystic beach perhaps supposed to represent heaven. I didn't understand that part, but by then had completely lost interest in the film.

The film meanders along for a few hours with lots of nice pictures. The stories could be interesting but ultimately don't really lead anywhere. The characters are generally completely 2 dimensional and completely unengaging, thus losing any emotional impact that the film might have had. There are lots of philosophical ramblings which appear to be asking `is there a god?' and showing us the insignificance of our place in the universe.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews