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The Tooth Fairy Paperback – 5 Sep 1996


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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Signet Books; New edition edition (5 Sep 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451184351
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451184351
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.4 x 18.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 817,668 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

A Terror Eight title: dark fiction for hot summer nights! --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Graham Joyce is the award-winning author of numerous short story collections and novels, including The Tooth Fairy, Smoking Poppy, The Facts of Life, The Limits of Enchantment, The Silent Land, Some Kind of Fairy Tale and The Year of the Ladybird. He won the British Fantasy Award six times, and the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel in 2003 for The Facts of Life. He also won the O Henry Award. In addition to his own writing, he taught a writing course at Nottingham Trent University. He died in September 2014. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Colin Leslie on 17 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You know the Tooth fairy right, cute little pixie type with wacky hat. Loveable creature much admired by young children as it sneaks about taking discarded teeth and swapping them for vast sums of money. Turns out they are not quite that nice after all.

Sam accidentally sees the Tooth Fairy one night and things take a downward turn from then on. You see, this tooth fairy, is an evil manipulative spirit and the fact that he/she is seen binds it to Sam, neither is particularly happy with this situation.

This book is not really about fairies though, good or bad. It's about growing up; it's about dealing with all life's problems through a difficult adolescence. It is, in fact, a coming of age story.

Set in the late sixties the book also plays out in tandem with the sexual and cultural revolutions taking place in that period. Sam and his friends are faced with increasingly complicated and often tragic family histories. Trying to make sense of this whilst being confronted with an often malevolent spirit makes Sam's life particularly difficult and for the reader, particularly interesting.

Graham Joyce's use of a normally happy childhood symbol in an altogether more malevolent form is genius. It allows him to exaggerate and emphasise the difficulties Sam experiences growing up. That difficult period of puberty as new feelings and experiences begin to come to prominence is given added mystique.

Needless to say sex plays a prominent role throughout the book as Sam's urges awaken against the background of a general rise in promiscuity in the late 60's. The offsetting of Sam's innocence with the Tooth Fairies experience provides a rich vein of confusion in Sam's mind which Joyce exploits to the full.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Sep 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'm reading the Tooth Fairy for the second time now, having looked it out for a friend. Once I'd found it I couldn't put it down (both times!) and my friend is going to have to wait!!! It's an absolutely FABULOUS book. The action starts right on the first page and the whole book is fast moving, exciting, imaginative and very gripping. I'd encourage anyone to read it - it's certainly one of the best books I've ever read and parts of it have stayed with me for years. Also, like one of the other reviewers, I too think The Tooth Fairy would make a great film - the imagery is so vivid! It's definitely a book that can be read again without loosing any of its excitement. I'm certainly going to buy more of Graham Joyce's books.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Cartimand TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Grotesque, beautiful, repulsive, compelling, hilarious, tragic, magical and very very erotic! Rarely have I read a book that provokes so many conflicting emotions. The angst of growing pains and awakening sexuality is very skilfully crafted and will, no doubt, strike a chord of recognition with many readers. The enigmatic character of the Tooth Fairy will haunt you long after the final page.

A minor masterpiece.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K Lancaster on 5 Jan 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Lots of other people have already left feedback covering how I feel about this book so I'll keep this quite short. I read this years ago and have re-read it a couple of time since. Now that in itself is saying something as I rarely read books more than once. This is a dark book full of the horrors of the night mixed with the confusion of puberty. Is the tooth fairy real or just part of the characters psyche? Who knows, certainly not the boy himself that's for sure. I lent my copy to a friend who made the mistake of reading it in bed just before trying to sleep in an otherwise empty house. She still hasn't forgiven me and had to keep the light on all night. I would say that this is my favourite of Graham Joyce's books but don't let that out you off reading the others.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 31 Oct 2009
Format: Paperback
When he is a young boy, Sam Southall loses a tooth and leaves it out for the tooth fairy to collect. Unfortunately, the tooth fairy is unhappy when Sam wakes up during the collection process, and the result is a long, fractious and unpleasant relationship that lasts the remainder of Sam's childhood.

As the years pass and Sam moves through adolescence with his best friends, Terry and Clive, their lives seem to be stricken with more than their fair share of tragedy and misfortune. Is this the doing of the malevolent tooth fairy, or is she merely a figment of Sam's imagination? A psychiatrist tries to get to the truth, with mixed results.

The Tooth Fairy was originally published in 1996 and won the British Fantasy Award the year after. It has gone on to become arguably Joyce's best-known novel. It is an effective, emotionally resonant story about growing up, childhood friendships and awkward teenage romances, with the question of whether the tooth fairy is real or merely a figment of Sam's mind providing an interesting and ambiguous mystery throughout the story.

It's told in an earthy manner, with some violence and sexual references, but not in a gratuitous manner. Iain M. Banks is a big fan of the novel and some echoes of The Wasp Factory can be detected in the book's uncompromising attitude, although The Tooth Fairy is somewhat more optimistic. The characters and situations are well-drawn, the family relationships work well and the fantastical elements are explored interestingly, although those looking for neat answers best be warned that there aren't any. The reader is often encouraged to come up with their own explanations and interpretations of story developments.
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