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The Time Machine and the Invisible Man Paperback – 30 Jan 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Digireads.com (30 Jan 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1420932349
  • ISBN-13: 978-1420932348
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 0.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 24,430 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on September 21, 1866. His father was a professional cricketer and sometime shopkeeper, his mother a former lady's maid. Although "Bertie" left school at fourteen to become a draper's apprentice (a life he detested), he later won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London, where he studied with the famous Thomas Henry Huxley. He began to sell articles and short stories regularly in 1893.

In 1895, his immediately successful novel rescued him from a life of penury on a schoolteacher's salary. His other "scientific romances" - The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), The First Men in the Moon (1901), and The War in the Air (1908) - won him distinction as the father of science fiction.

Henry James saw in Wells the most gifted writer of the age, but Wells, having coined the phrase "the war that will end war" to describe World War I, became increasingly disillusioned and focused his attention on educating mankind with his bestselling Outline of History (1920) and his later utopian works. Living until 1946, Wells witnessed a world more terrible than any of his imaginative visions, and he bitterly observed: "Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supercede me."

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First Sentence
THE TIME TRAVELLER (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Lawrance on 20 Nov 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
A very good deal with 2 great classic stories. Bought for my daughter studying an abridged version at school and wanted to read the whole. The double edition provided a good opportunity to extend interest. Recommended value.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mountain lady on 20 Feb 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this for my son who had expressed an interest in reading it. My main concern was that 'modern' books are a lot faster, and pacier, than the books of the past and he might find it 'slow'. He didn't. He thought both stories were terrific, as did his young sister, so I would highly recommend it as a book which contains two gripping stories but also interests youngsters in the novelists of the past.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bilal Bhatti on 3 Nov 2013
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was ok, has two great science fiction stories, however the book did seem a bt flimsy and seemed easy to break if not used carefully.
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I have always loved the film version of the time machine, and always wanted to read the book. Verey good. I loved it. The invisible man has had a number of films made of it, but I think the book is better. I really ought to read more H G Wells.
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By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 July 2013
Format: Paperback
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Some of the details are fascinating as the traveler come to discover the secret of the results of social striation over centuries which eventually creates two separate species from humans. Which species is the more human? Can anything be done to prevent or correct this?

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After all the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly, if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.

Anticipations: Of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human life and Thought
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I saw on a reading list of recommended classic those two stories as easy-read classics. Either whoever posted that comment has a completely idea of easy read from me or I have missed something. The time Machine is awfully written story that I regret reading (thankfully I already started forgetting most of it). I am still reading The Invisible Man and although it is a better story it is still not as good as the title implies. Overall I could have skipped reading those.
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By Naan88 on 9 Feb 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought it used, but the book was in a very good condition. I had never read something from Wells before, but I have to say I loved him, The Time Machine was my favourite one. Don't believe people who tell you that science fiction is a useless kind of literature. It's just great, and I'm not even an expert in the field
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