The Third Angel and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Third Angel has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Third Angel Paperback – 3 Apr 2008


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£11.99
£6.00 £0.01
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£14.01
£11.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Third Angel + The Dovekeepers + The Story Sisters
Price For All Three: £27.37

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; Reprint edition (3 April 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0701182725
  • ISBN-13: 978-0701182724
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.1 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 758,511 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Alice Hoffman is my favourite writer (Jodi Picoult)

A great atmospheric storyteller . . . her books are a real pleasure (Kate Atkinson)

Like her contemporaries, Carol Shields and Alice Munro, Hoffman has an acute yet tender eye for detail (The Times)

THE THIRD ANGEL is brilliantly crafted, deeply moving, and utterly enchanting. I loved these characters for their complexity, their unpredictability and for the way they showed subtle and shifting nuance in human nature. One of the best things about Alice Hoffman's writing is that she grounds you in detail and also frees your imagination to soar to places it has never been--often simultaneously. Reading her is immensely satisfying--and addictive! (Elizabeth Berg, Author Of The Day I Ate Whatever I Wanted)

Gently gets under your skin. You'll be hooked (Daily Mail)

Book Description

Everyday tragedy comes face to face with the magical and inexplicable in this haunting, poignant, addictive novel, which travels effortlessly across three generations and through time.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By LittleReader VINE VOICE on 1 Nov. 2008
Format: Paperback
I am a huge fan of AH's work and so it is with regret that I have to say how much I disliked this novel.
In fact, 'dislike' is probably the wrong word as I think you have to feel passionately about something to experience this emotion and, unfortunately, passion is not in any way connected with this novel.

Dull, lacklustre, soul-less, looooong and so very far removed from Hoffman's usually graceful, often bordering on ghoulish, style. I couldn't get under the skin of the characters (they were wooden and lifeless) and the flow is stilted and confusing. I would also struggle to tell you accurately what the book is actually about as it spent such long periods sitting around waiting for me to have the heart to continue with it that I kept having to re-read portions for it to make any sense at all!
In fact, that's it - I'm double checking - was this really written by her? Try it and see what you think...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on 31 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
The Third Angel was one of my book club's choices this year (2008). I had never read anything by Alice Hoffman and was assured that her work was good. However, the book was really hard going. It's in three parts but the structure of the books doesn't work. The mother of the son/fiancé who dies in the first section reappears as her younger self in trendy London and has a fling with a dissolute rock star. The supposed links between sections didn't work, and it was a chore to finish the book. If I hadn't been reading it for my book club, I would not have persevered. The only remotely interesting idea was that a man could be haunted by the ghost of his younger, different self. To conclude: it read like chick-lit with a supenatural twist, but the plotting was clumsy and the characters were undeveloped. I was assured that other books by Alice Hoffman were better than this, and I hope so, but I would be reluctant to try her again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
A poignantly, beautiful story told going backwards in time. Well, it starts in the present day ending with the part set in the Fifties, where it all began. What running themes carry across the book? Parental relationships, sick mothers, abandoning fathers, sibling friendships and rivalry, lovers, death and most importantly the Lion Park Hotel in Knightsbridge and Mrs Ridge.

In the first part we have two sisters, the younger whose jealousy towards her sister nearly ruins their relationship. Their mother had cancer during their childhood, their father leaves because he cannot cope. Now Allie, the eldest is getting married to a man who is terminally ill.

In part two, we see Frieda, the groom's mother cope with her life. Frieda has a close relationship with her father until he leaves her mother for the bereaved wife of a patient. When her father moves on she cannot deal with this and she becomes closer to her mother. Frieda works at a Knightsbridge hotel and meets a struggling musician engaged to be married to one of two wealthy, very close, heroine addicted sisters.

The final part of the story is devoted to Lucy, the mother of the sisters in part one. Lucy's mother has passed away and Lucy has come to London with her father and his new wife. After they have booked into the hotel, Lucy escapes her father and his prickly wife, wandering off to Hyde Park where she talks to two sisters, both very blonde and very close. Later on, after a tragic event, Lucy becomes ill and is treated by a doctor.

Without giving too much of the story away, I hope I have managed to give you the gist of some of the pieces which link these people together in far more ways than one.

In real life, they say the world is not that big and in many ways that is true.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This offering by Ms. Hoffman is a generational piece whose roots are in the 1950s. The backdrop for most of the story is the Lion Park hotel in London, a second-rate hotel that is haunted.

Our first encounter with sisters Maddie and Allie uncovers a betrayal by the younger sister who lives a care-free existence based on the fact that she believes that she was an unloved child. Allie, the older sister, has pretty much done what was expected of her because she has always been the caretaker; first when her mother had cancer and later when her fiance suffers from the same disease. She realizes only too late that she truly loves her fiance and moves swiftly to makes things right only to lose him too.

Freida, the fiance's mother, takes up the middle of the book. Her story is set in the 1960s and brought back for this reader 'the look' that was so popular then in London: overly made-up eyes, short mini-skirts, high boots, swingy music, free love, etc. Hoping to escape from the dreariness of a rural youth she makes her way to the Lion Park hotel where she works as a maid. Soon, though, she becomes the muse for a rock-star wanna-be who is hooked on drugs and has a very Paris Hilton-like girlfriend. In the end, Freida puts all of the very trendy and drug-filled life behind her and returns to her rural home where she marries the boyfriend who had gone on to college. She goes on to nursing school herself and lives a very fulfilling life in spite of the ghostly happenings that populated her time working at the Lion Park.

The thread that sews it all together is Lucy Green. Lucy is the mother of the two young women we first met at the outset of the story. Inadvertently she is the one who caused the problems that have brought about the haunting of the Lion Park's seventh floor.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback