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The Tears of Eros Paperback – 1 Dec 1989


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Product details

  • Paperback: 213 pages
  • Publisher: City Lights Books (1 Dec. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0872862224
  • ISBN-13: 978-0872862227
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.3 x 20.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 521,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BeeManSenior on 1 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback
The Tears of Eros does no credit to Georges Bataille nor to its publisher. It's not so much an essay as a loose assemblage of remarks, most of which are merely repetitions of points made at greater length, and with much greater force and cohesion, in Bataille's Eroticism. These remarks (repetitious in themselves) are preceded by a self-regarding preface written by Bataille's editor, Joseph Marie Lo Duca, plus nine pages of letters written by the ailing Bataille during the creation of The Tears of Eros. As for the main part of the book, it consists largely of poor-quality reproductions of photos, prints and paintings, of variable relevance to the text, and sloppily captioned (did nobody at City Lights know the difference between Lucrezia and Lucretius, for example?). The notoriety of this book rests chiefly on its inclusion of photographs showing the execution, by mutilation, of a man identified here as Fou Tchou Li. Bataille's use of these terrible images, and his observations on them, are the subject of a devastating critique in Death by a Thousand Cuts by Timothy Brook, Jerome Bourgon and Gregory Blue, in a chapter that suggests - in Bataille's defence - that Joseph Marie Lo Duca should be regarded more as the co-author of this shoddy little book than as its editor. If you're new to Bataille, this is emphatically not the place to start. Read Eroticism instead.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
The Tears of Eros is a fitting culmination of Bataille's search for value through excess. Although Bataille addresses many of the themes touched on here in greater detail in earlier works (Eroticism, The Accursed Share), The Tears of Eros is notable for the significant amount of artwork included to illustrate the connection Bataille develops between sex, death, expenditure, and sovereign value. This is a "must-read" for any serious student of contemporary philosophy and--for that matter--any who would insist that value resides elsewhere than in a petty, bourgeois individualism.
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3 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Sept. 1997
Format: Paperback
It is from woman, we come and to woman, we return because we all have both aspects in our being...female and maleness.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
53 of 62 people found the following review helpful
An exploration of value through excessive experience 3 Jun. 1999
By Joo Heung Lee (JooHeung@aol.com) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Tears of Eros is a fitting culmination of Bataille's search for value through excess. Although Bataille addresses many of the themes touched on here in greater detail in earlier works (Eroticism, The Accursed Share), The Tears of Eros is notable for the significant amount of artwork included to illustrate the connection Bataille develops between sex, death, expenditure, and sovereign value. This is a "must-read" for any serious student of contemporary philosophy and--for that matter--any who would insist that value resides elsewhere than in a petty, bourgeois individualism.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The worst of Bataille 1 Oct. 2014
By BeeManSenior - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Tears of Eros does no credit to Georges Bataille nor to its publisher. It's not so much an essay as a loose assemblage of remarks, most of which are merely repetitions of points made at greater length, and with much greater force and cohesion, in Bataille's Eroticism. These remarks (repetitious in themselves) are preceded by a self-regarding preface written by Bataille's editor, Joseph Marie Lo Duca, plus nine pages of letters written by the ailing Bataille during the creation of The Tears of Eros. As for the main part of the book, it consists mostly of poor-quality reproductions of photos, prints and paintings, of variable relevance to the text, and sloppily captioned (did nobody at City Lights know the difference between Lucrezia and Lucretius, for instance?). The notoriety of this book rests chiefly on its inclusion of photographs showing the execution, by mutilation, of a man identified here as Fou Tchou Li. Bataille's use of these terrible images, and his observations on them, are the subject of a devastating critique in Death by a Thousand Cuts by Timothy Brook, Jerome Bourgon and Gregory Blue, in a chapter that suggests - in Bataille's defence - that Joseph Marie Lo Duca should be regarded more as the co-author of this shoddy little book than as its editor. If you're new to Bataille, this is emphatically not the place to start. Read Eroticism instead.
15 of 41 people found the following review helpful
why the fuss? 5 Jun. 2005
By Arizona - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I cannot understand why the fuss over this book. The text is disappointing: repetitive, opinionated, insubstantial, more like desultory notes than anything else. The images are all black-and-white and poorly reproduced, and again repetitive and disconnected.

There is too much horror in it. Bataille associates violence, horror, terror, pain, cruelty, with eroticism, madness, ecstasy, the sacred. Perhaps intense cultivation of pleasure creates a corresponding accumulative cultivation of pain. Why should this be so? I don't know except that we have what it takes to explore and we can explore in all and any direction. It's as simple as that.

It's possible to write books and essays that are lucid and meaningful and it's possible to write "The Tears of Eros".
11 of 99 people found the following review helpful
Extraordinary treatment of sex and death, emotions and words 2 Sept. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is from woman, we come and to woman, we return because we all have both aspects in our being...female and maleness
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