£5.99
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £2.00 (25%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £0.93
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Tao of Pooh (The Wisdom of Pooh) Paperback – 6 Feb 2003


See all 34 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.99
£2.68 £2.18

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

The Tao of Pooh (The Wisdom of Pooh) + The Tao of Pooh & The Te of Piglet (Wisdom of Pooh) + Winnie-the-Pooh's Little Book Of Wisdom
Price For All Three: £17.67

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.93
Trade in The Tao of Pooh (The Wisdom of Pooh) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.93, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Egmont; New edition edition (6 Feb 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405204265
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405204262
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

A.A. Milne A.A. Milne is quite simply one of the most famous children’s authors of all time. He created Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends Piglet, Eeyore, Tigger, Kanga and Roo based on the real nursery toys played with by his son, Christopher Robin. And those characters not only became the stars of his classic children’s books, Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner, and his poetry for children, they have also been adapted for film, TV and the stage. Through his writings for Punch magazine, A.A. Milne met E.H. Shepard. Shepard went on to draw the original illustrations to accompany Milne’s classics, earning him the name “the man who drew Pooh”.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"You see, Pooh," I said, "a lot of people don't seem to know what Taoism is . . ." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By heddi@imberpr.demon.co.uk on 16 Aug 2001
Format: Paperback
For spiritual or non spiritual types, this is a beautifully written book explaining the simplistic forms of life that we choose to create and then confuse and/or burden ourselves with.
We all bring baggage with us based on good and bad experiences yet are not always aware of why or how.
Based on the animation kids characters - Winnie the Pooh, Piglet and all their friends - the author uses these strong personalities of each to break down our daily pre-conceived ideas of how we view life, tend to over-exaggerate life challenges and create problems based on these past experiences.
The characters are used as examples to help us determine which (if not a bit of all) personality type we primarily fall under and understand what, why and how we think like we do.
I recommend anyone to read the book, wait a year and then re-read again. The second time around, the reader will start to acknowledge or confirm their own progressions based on understanding this book and possibly using examples to better their lives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Jan 1999
Format: Paperback
The principles within this book make you really think about the way you deal with life and life's events. Pooh Bear illustrates the Taoism attitude towards life perfectly and since reading this book I have become a far more relaxed and happy person. Having now read it a number of times I can say that everytime I read it I feel an overwhelming sense of contentedness and a feeling that whatever happens everything will "come out in the wash!".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By K. P. Borley TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Jan 2012
Format: Paperback
Would you like to have an understanding of the basics of Taoism? In the past have you browsed through the books on Taoism in Waterstones, read a few lines which made no sense at all and promplty returned the book on the shelf? Did you go as far as to actually purchase Lao-tzu's Tao Te Ching only to have it sitting on your shelf as an ornament, occasionally picked up, a few lines read and then promptly put back in-situ (maybe I'll read it another time)? But there is something inside you of course that wants to know more about Taoism, you have a deep rooted feeling that it will be good for you, almost as if your higher self is pushing you towards it. Well all is fine, you have been going with the flow recently, taking life as it comes and finding things a lot easier, and you have ended up here reading these reviews. This is a delightful book. This is where you will get your first understanding of the principles of Taoism, of going with the flow, of the uncarved block, etc. The principles of Taoism here are put simply (which is always better). Gone are the abstract quotes (now what do they mean by this?). It's a delightful read, with the help of our friends from the 100 Acre Wood (even Eeyore has something important to teach us), wonderfully written by the sincere and genuine Benjamin Hoff. This isn't a guy who is in this for the money, he loves his Taoism, he loves his Pooh, and wants more people to benefit from the ancient chinese teachings. You so often read claims of books that will 'change your life' but they never really do. Well this one might, probably in a gentle subtle way to begin with (which is always better). You must be on your spiritual path to be considering buying this book. Should you buy it? Well, what does your intuition say?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 22 Dec 2005
Format: Paperback
`The Tao of Pooh', a fascinating synthesis of Eastern philosophy and Western children's literature, is done largely in conversational style between Benjamin Hoff, erstwhile writer, photographer and musician with a penchant for forests and bears. Thus, Pooh makes a natural philosophical companion. But, more than a companion, Pooh is, for Hoff, the very embodiment of the Tao.
`It's about how to stay happy and calm under all circumstances!' I yelled.
'Have you read it?' asked Pooh.
This is two-way book: to explain Taoism through Winnie-the-Pooh, and to explain Winnie-the-Pooh (not always an easy task itself) through Taoism. Taoism, more academically, is a religion indigenous to China, built upon teachings primarily of Lao-tzu, with significant influence from Buddha and K'ung Fu-tse. It is in the teachings of harmony and emptiness and being of Lao-tzu, however, that Taoism draws its meaning, believing that earth is a reflection of heaven, and that the world `is not a setter of traps but a teacher of valuable lessons.'
As with many religions, this one took various guises: philosophic, monastic, structural, folk. But through them all, the imperceptible Tao, the essence of being, essentially undescribable, shapes the universe continually out of chaos, with a yin and yang alteration of perpetual transformation, in which nothing remains eternal save the Tao.
This makes Pooh a perfect example and exemplar. `For the written character P'u, the typical Chinese dictionary will give a definition of 'natural, simple, plain, honest.' P'u is composed of two separate characters combined: the first, the 'radical' or root-meaning one, is that for tree or wood; the second, the 'phonetic' or sound-giving one, is the character for dense growth or thicket.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ed404 on 1 Nov 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
ok if you haven't read this book you really have to, it wasn't a best seller for nothing. It gets deep without being silly, great read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback