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Product details

  • Audio CD: 3 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan Digital Audio; 1 edition (4 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781405090926
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405090926
  • ASIN: 1405090928
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 12.4 x 2.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,501,276 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire, and now divides his time between Richmond and Canada. Peter has written twenty-two books in the bestselling DCI Banks series as well as two collections of short stories and three standalone novels, the most recent of which is Number One bestseller BEFORE THE POISON. The critically acclaimed crime novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world.

Peter's DCI Banks is now a major ITV1 drama by Left Bank productions. Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) plays Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) plays DI Annie Cabbot. The first series aired in Autumn 2011 with an adaptation of FRIEND OF THE DEVIL, the second in Autumn 2012, and the third in February 2014.

Peter's standalone novel BEFORE THE POISON won the IMBA's 2013 Dilys Award as well as the 2012 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel by the Crime Writers of Canada. This was Peter's sixth Arthur Ellis award.

Find out more from Peter's website, www.inspectorbanks.com, or visit his Facebook page, www.facebook.com/peterrobinsonauthor.


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4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Jan 2004
Format: Paperback
Now, this is only my second taste of Peter Robinson. My first came when I eagerly read Gallows View the first Inspector Banks novel, and came away suitably impressed. Impetuous as I am, I decided to abandon series order and read this latest one. Naughty, but true. Needless to say, I am now positive that I have been missing out on a great series.
In the summer of 1965, Graham Marshall, a young boy and friend of Alan Banks, disappeared into thin air while on his paper round. Now, decades later, some human bones are unearthed not ten miles from his home. They are quickly identified as Graham's.
Alan Banks is holidaying in Greece (recuperating from his last, affecting case) when he reads of the discovery of his old friend's remains in a newspaper, and promptly decides that it's time to return to see if he can lend a hand.
While all this is going on, another young boy disappears in Yorkshire, and while the dual cases are entirely unconnected, for Banks they still hold eerie similarities, as they echo each other across the gap of years. Then, curious memories begin to surface about his old friend. Memories which may have a bearing upon what happened, and memories that Banks now wants explaining...
It is clear that Chief Inspector Banks has remained the likeable, delightfully realistic protagonist that I met in Gallows View, and I suspect that for long-term fans it'll be a great treat to meet, as we do in this book, his parents.
This is often a very nostalgic novel, giving us insight into Bank's childhood at the same time as being both moving and haunting.
Read more ›
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104 of 108 people found the following review helpful By Mme Roslyn Mor on 18 May 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read all of Peter Robinson's novels and suspect that the Mass Market editions are all reprints of other titles.This book was originally titled The Summer That Never Was, as first class a read as we have come to expect from this author. Is it necessary to go to the ISBN numbers to avoid buying the same book twice? I'd be grateful for some feedback on this subject.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K. Wolf on 2 Oct 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have found that the safest way to buy Peter Robinson and Ian Rankin Books is through Amazon UK. I live in the US and they are always changing the titles. As I have traveled frequently to the UK over the years, I found that the Robinson and Rankin titles I often thought to be new books I hadn't seen, turned out to be the original tiles. After duplicating several books, I have found it just safer, if more expensive, to order the books directly from the UK when they are first published.
As a fan of Peter Robinson, I only gave this a 4 star rating as it just wasn't as strong a story. But, from here on out, it just gets better...
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. Seymour on 3 Feb 2003
Format: Hardcover
I've been a fan of Inspector Alan Banks and Peter Robinson for about 12 years and religiously buy all his new books. This is perhaps the best yet. I would urge anyone to try and read the Banks novels in order as you will gain more from the characterisation and understand some of Banks' 'demons' if you do so. Highly recommended, not just this one but the whole series. And doubly so for any Leeds readers as Pete Robinson drops in lots of local colour
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Jan 2003
Format: Hardcover
Now, this is only my second taste of Peter Robinson. My first came when I eagerly read Gallows View the first Inspector Banks novel, and came away suitably impressed. Impetuous as I am, I decided to abandon series order and read this latest one. Naughty, but true. Needless to say, I am now positive that I have been missing out on a great series.
In the summer of 1965, Graham Marshall, a young boy and friend of Alan Banks, disappeared into thin air while on his paper round. Now, decades later, some human bones are unearthed not ten miles from his home. They are quickly identified as Graham’s.
Alan Banks is holidaying in Greece (recuperating from his last, affecting case) when he reads of the discovery of his old friend’s remains in a newspaper, and promptly decides that it’s time to return to see if he can lend a hand.
While all this is going on, another young boy disappears in Yorkshire, and while the dual cases are entirely unconnected, for Banks they still hold eerie similarities, as they echo each other across the gap of years. Then, curious memories begin to surface about his old friend. Memories which may have a bearing upon what happened, and memories that Banks now wants explaining…
It is clear that Chief Inspector Banks has remained the likeable, delightfully realistic protagonist that I met in Gallows View, and I suspect that for long-term fans it’ll be a great treat to meet, as we do in this book, his parents.
This is often a very nostalgic novel, giving us insight into Bank’s childhood at the same time as being both moving and haunting.
Read more ›
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56 of 61 people found the following review helpful By olivia on 14 May 2003
Format: Hardcover
The site is a little misleading: Summer that Never Was is, I believe, the original Canadian title while Close to Home is the title used by American publishers. Either way- fine novel though perhaps not as strong as others he's written.
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