Start your 30-day free trial


Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£5.00
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Add to Basket
£9.95
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: Leisurezone
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

The Statement [DVD] [2004]


Price: £4.45 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by 666 Media and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
32 new from £2.49 9 used from £1.84 2 collectible from £3.48

Amazon Instant Video

Watch The Statement instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post

Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

The Statement [DVD] [2004] + The Whistle Blower [DVD] (1987) + Flawless [DVD] [2007]
Price For All Three: £16.33

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Michael Caine, Tilda Swinton, Alan Bates, Jeremy Northam, Charlotte Rampling
  • Directors: Norman Jewison
  • Writers: Brian Moore, Ronald Harwood
  • Producers: David M. Thompson, Jason Piette, Julia Rosenberg, Mark Musselman, Michael Cowan
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English, French, German, Italian, Latin
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Momentum Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: 26 July 2004
  • Run Time: 115 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00028HCII
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 40,993 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Political thriller starring Michael Caine as Pierre Brossard, a known World War 2 criminal who has never been brought to trial, and has until now been leading a peaceful, anonymous life sheltered by the Catholic church. Now, nearly fifty years after committing the atrocities he has tried so hard to forget, a new war crimes investigation has been launched and the police (and hit-men) are after him.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 18 Feb. 2009
Format: DVD
For the first 15 minutes or so it's hard to see quite why Norman Jewison's The Statement drew such derision during its blink-and-you'll-miss-it theatrical run. Then Michael Caine starts to Act with a capital A and suddenly the film falls to bits around you as you realize just how horribly miscast the whole thing is.

Brian Moore's source novel could almost be a belated sequel to Lacombe, Lucien, with its French Nazi collaborator finding himself on the run from both the police and a group of assassins in the wake of the new Crimes Against Humanity laws, in the process relying on the help of those officials who slipped through the net after the war and those in the Catholic Church who approved of his anti-communist rationale for his actions. It's a fine part for the right actor - say Philippe Noiret or Jean Rochefort - but a terrible one for Caine, playing to all his weaknesses: he's never been good at grief, extroverted rage or Uriah Heapish obsequiousness, all of which are required here as the character hovers between a desperate religious faith and callous manipulation and all of which Caine fails miserably at. Sadly he's not alone. As if to compensate for the absurdity of casting a cockney as a Vichy Frenchman, this Anglo-Canadian-French co-production doesn't have a single French actor in a speaking role, instead populating the film almost entirely with British character actors delivering 'typically French' dialogue, though thankfully none attempt the accent.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 1 Sept. 2004
Format: DVD
Although his films aren't always artistic successes, Michael Caine is one of my favorite actors, and at his best when his character is cheekily likable, e.g. in THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING (1975), SLEUTH (1972), SECONDHAND LIONS (2003). Rarely, he plays someone hateful, the most recent coming to mind being SHINER (2000). Here, in THE STATEMENT, his on-screen persona is oddly ambiguous, and it's left to supporting characters to provide the plot's protagonists.
It's June 1942, and a young Vichy French police officer, Pierre Brossard, supervises the round-up and execution of seven Jews by a contingent of German soldiers. After the war, he's charged with murder and collaboration with the enemy, but he escapes from prison, apparently aided by former superiors in the police establishment. Now, it's 1992, and Brossard (Michael Caine) lives in constant fear of exposure. A fervent Catholic, he skulks from French monastery to monastery, wherein he finds refuge with the help of sympathetic abbots and Church officials. A retired, former police official provides regular payments of money for frugal, day-to-day living. Now, Brossard is apparently being pursued by Jewish activists bent on his assassination. And if he hasn't worries enough, the French Justice Ministry has assigned a judge, Annemarie Livi (Tilda Swinton), and a police investigator, Colonel Roux (Jeremy Northam), to track Pierre down and take him into custody charged with war crimes. Are the two events related?
Pierre's wartime atrocity and his cold-hearted willingness to protect himself at any cost in the present are unlikely to endear him to the audience.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Jan. 2005
Format: DVD
When I read Brian Moore's book a few years ago I was hooked from the first page. It is a tight, thoughtful and gripping thriller based on real events. The film is true to the book and a very good adaptation with great performances by a top knotch cast. Caine is superb, but so are all the others. I highly recommend it even though its portrayal of the Catholic Church is perhaps rather one sided and negative - fostering the idea of secret societies and complicity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Nov. 2006
Format: DVD
First we see the executions of seven Jews in Vichy France overseen by Milice officer Pierre Brossard, a change from black and white to colour and from 1944 to 1992 and after hardly a word of dialogue you just know that Pierre Brossard (Michael Caine) is still evading capture 48 years later.

Brossard is hunted by a shadowy organisation operated at arms length by senior politicians compromised in WW11 and also the law headed by Judge Annemarie Livi (Tilda Swinton on top form) and Colonel Roux (Jeremy Northam), the Catholic priests he relies for shelter are forced to turn against him.

Caine does a wonderful job with his character, at the end you are still asking questions, is he really a devote catholic or is he just a callous blackmailer exploiting the church to ensure his safety?

As he shambles around with heart problems does one pity him or want him to suffer a slow painful death?

Alternatively after 48 years should we say enough is enough and let the pitiful creature live, yet how pitiful is he as he very professionally kills two assassins sent after him?

An engrossing film, questions and uncertainty is what it is all about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback