Includes FREE MP3
version
of this album.
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
The Music Warehouse Add to Basket
£5.50
mrtopseller Add to Basket
£5.50
Media Vortex Add to Basket
£9.99
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

The State [CD]

Nickelback Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
Price: £5.51 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
 : Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
   Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 29 Jan.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
‹  Return to Product Overview

Product Description

Product Description

Limited SHM-CD edition of the 2nd full-length album which made them get a Canadian Grammy Award 'Juno Awards'. Originally released in 2000. A bonus track, 'Little Friend', is also added.

Amazon.co.uk

Prior to the release of The State, grungey Nickelback won a Juno Award--the Canadian equivalent of a BRIT Award--for Best New Band. Named after an expression often used by bassist Mike Kroeger when serving coffees for $1.95 each in Starbucks, Nickelback have toured alongside Creed and owe a similar debt to the anthemic rock and articulate soulfulness of Pearl Jam. The State is consciously dramatic, with sweet strums constantly overwhelmed by crashing waves of distorted guitar. Singer Chad Kroeger (Mike's brother) meaningfully croons and wails his tales of life in a small town, with its complex relationships, claustrophobic underground culture and uncomfortable struggle between easy comfort (staying) and invigorating adventure (leaving). Yet Nickelback are at their best when escaping the Pearl Jam influence, as with the heavy, ponderous Billy Squier-style riffing of "Deep", the dirty 70s grind of "Not Leavin' Yet" and the slightly more experimental "Worthy To Say", where a near-Oriental ambient guitar is suddenly hammered by a burst of big rock and Chad Kroeger delivers a bluesy rap recalling prime-time Paul Rodgers. Nickelback are good, but still growing. Once they achieve their own clearly identifiable sound, they may well be great. --Dominic Wills
‹  Return to Product Overview