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The Sound of '65/There's a Bond Between Us

25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Jan. 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Beat Goes on
  • ASIN: B00002MP7R
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,963 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Hoochie Coochie Man
2. Baby Make Love To Me
3. Neighbour Neighbour
4. Early In The Morning
5. Spanish Blues
6. Oh Baby
7. Little Girl
8. I Want You
9. Wade In The Water
10. Got My Mojo Working
11. Train Time
12. Baby Be Good To Me
13. Half A Man
14. Tammy
15. Who's Afraid Of Viginia Woolf?
16. Hear Me Calling Your Name
17. The Night Time Is The Right Time
18. Walkin' In The Park
19. Last Night
20. Baby Can It Be True
See all 26 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Originally released in 1965. The Organization was formed in 1963 when Graham Bond, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce and Dick Heckstall-Smith all left Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated. Baker and Bruce went on to form the rhythm section of Cream with Eric Clapton, and Dick Heckstall-Smith went on to play with Colosseum. The cover design on 'There's A Bond Between Us' is by Ginger Baker. Both albums were produced by Robert Stigwood.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By M. Davies on 5 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD
The "Sound of '65" album by the Graham Bond Organisation never even bothered the LP charts of the time (neither did the follow-up "There's a Bond Between Us") but I think in some respects it was a little ahead of its time. The band is renowned for half its membership being Jack Bruce (Bass and Harmonica) and Ginger Baker (drums), both to unite with Eric Clapton the following year and create supergroup Cream. Dick Heckstall-Smith was a superb blues/jazz saxophonist and later was an integral part of Colosseum having passed through John Mayall's Bluebreakers. I assure you this album WILL grow on you whether or not you are an early British R & B fan. Graham Bond's voice is raw but it works within this fusion of rock/jazz/blues. Bruce sings on some tracks ( perhaps he should have been lead vocalist? ) and you get a taste of experimaental stuff that matures later in Cream. Baker's drumming is brilliant of course (just listen to track 6) and how about his own composition 'Camels and Elephants' on the second album, all sorts of influences can be found here. It all gel's, and although it never scored at the time, I can see why those in the business at the time rated this band. Some say its because there was no glamorous image or pretty boy up front, but that doesn't hold water when you think of the Jeff Beck Group, they had a pretty boy up front but were unlucky enough to have a manager more interested in bubble-gum pop .... perhaps bad management with no vision in both cases ?????
Alas Bond slid into very serious substance abuse, Ginger and Jack hated each other with Jack departing to John Mayall who I believe thought him too unorthodox blues (Mayall's guitarist at the time Eric Clapton was impressed however) and Jack then went to Manfred Mann.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rob Dylan on 17 Aug. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This compilation of two studio albums by the Graham Bond Organisation is superb and sounds great even now which clearly indicates how ahead of their time they were and along with Alexis Korner and John Mayall, forerunners of the sixties British Blues movement. Graham Bond's raw vocals are an acquired taste but I feel sure by the end of the cd it will definately grow on you. More important is what a great group of musicians these were. I always thought Ginger Baker was one of the greatest ever drummers and these early recordings go a long way to support my claim. Also quite apparant is some great bass playing by Jack Bruce, however, it is unfair to single out individuals when the whole band were a group of exceptionally talented musicians.
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54 of 57 people found the following review helpful By bobobob5 on 14 Nov. 1999
Format: Audio CD
These two records in their original vinyl format have been highly-valued collectors items since the late Sixties. Graham's importance as a key figure in the development of rock music is covered in the reference books. But there can be no substitiute for hearing his legendary Organisation for yourself! The stunning power of the band, compared to other groups of the time, is here in abundance for all to see. The material is mostly classic R&B, but the much gentler song 'Tammy' gives a fascinating glimpse of what else Graham might have achieved. The Organisation lacked a glamourous image, spent most of their time working in the clubs for too little money, and were unable to break into the charts with a hit single. Effectively reformed as 'Cream' in late '66 - with Eric Clapton replacing Graham Bond - the groundwork laid down in these albums went on to change the face of rock music. Whether this is music you listen to today for pleasure - as was originally intended when first recorded - or for more academic or collector reasons is debatable. But to truly understand the roots of modern rock, and see why the Organisation were so highly regarded at the time, this recording is a 'must have'.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Patton on 5 Oct. 2009
Format: Audio CD
When I listened to this CD for the first time, I was a bit sad. "Only two albums?"

Mind you, these were two albums released within eight months of each other in 1965, even while Bond and his Organisation were keeping up a full roster of club dates, session work for other musicians, and opening concerts for visiting American acts. Moreover, this was a band with, to put it delicately, issues. The fact that they managed to turn out two albums in a year and that both of them are top-flight stuff isn't a pity--it's something close to a bloody miracle.

Not that you could tell there was any strife from the songs. They roar through covers of such blues standards as "Hoochie Coochie Man," "Got My Mojo Working," and "Wade in The Water" with high spirits, great skill, and a lot of rascally good humor. Bond's wonderful three-pack-a-day growl on the first two songs is a big help, but they are just as spectacular on the third, a jazzy and sophisticated instrumental book-ended with sly little quotes from Bach's "Toccata and Fugue." (organist's humor, no doubt) The originals range from the wonderfully serpentine "Spanish Blues," full of incredible stuff for Bond's organ and Ginger Baker's drums, to the quirky, syncopated "Baby Be Good to Me, which Jack Bruce, the bassist, co-wrote and sings (as well as playing bass and harmonica) to the hushed and deeply sexy "Baby Can it Be True?," a song so soft that it sounds as if the band was playing it while lying on their backs. "Dick's Instrumental," a sweet and graceful showcase for tenor saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith demonstrates that although these fellows had moved in a different musical direction, they never completely abandoned their roots in jazz.
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