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The Social Network [DVD] [2010]


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Product details

  • Actors: Jesse Eisenberg, Justin Timberlake
  • Directors: David Fincher
  • Format: Subtitled, PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Arabic, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Hindi, Norwegian, Swedish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 27 Jun. 2011
  • Run Time: 120 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (213 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00569K7EY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,089 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

David Fincher’s The Social Network is the stunning tale of a new breed of cultural insurgent: a punk genius who sparked a revolution and changed the face of human interaction for a generation, and perhaps forever. Shot through with emotional brutality and unexpected humor, this superbly crafted film chronicles the formation of Facebook and the battles over ownership that followed upon the website’s unfathomable success. With a complex, incisive screenplay by Aaron Sorkin and a brilliant cast including Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield and Justin Timberlake, The Social Network bears witness to the birth of an idea that rewove the fabric of society even as it unraveled the friendship of its creators.

From Amazon.co.uk

They all laughed at college nerd Mark Zuckerberg, whose idea for a social-networking site made him a billionaire. And they all laughed at the idea of a Facebook movie--except writer Aaron Sorkin and director David Fincher, merely two of the more extravagantly talented filmmakers around. Sorkin and Fincher's breathless picture, The Social Network, is a fast and witty creation myth about how Facebook grew from Zuckerberg's insecure geek-at-Harvard days into a phenomenon with 500 million users. Sorkin frames the movie around two lawsuits aimed at the lofty but brilliant Zuckerberg (deftly played by Adventureland's Jesse Eisenberg): a claim that he stole the idea from Ivy League classmates, and a suit by his original, now slighted, business partner (Andrew Garfield). The movie follows a familiar rise-and-fall pattern, with temptation in the form of a sunny California Beelzebub (an expert Justin Timberlake as former Napster founder Sean Parker) and an increasingly tangled legal mess. Emphasizing the legal morass gives Sorkin and Fincher a chance to explore how unsocial this social-networking business can be, although the irony seems a little facile. More damagingly, the film steers away from the prickly figure of Zuckerberg in the latter stages--and yet Zuckerberg presents the most intriguing personality in the movie, even if the movie takes pains to make us understand his shortcomings. Fincher's command of pacing and his eye for the clean spaces of Aughts-era America are bracing, and he can't resist the technical trickery involved in turning actor Armie Hammer into privileged Harvard twins (Hammer is letter-perfect). Even with its flaws, The Social Network is a galloping piece of entertainment, a smart ride with smart people… who sometimes do dumb things. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

106 of 121 people found the following review helpful By Sarcosuchus on 17 Oct. 2010
Format: DVD
Like many people, I was actively resistant to the idea of watching a movie telling the story of Facebook. Smarmy frat-house brats high-fiving as they hunch around a computer screen with a few "brewskis" - becoming billionaires en route - sounded like a recipe for the most teeth-grindingly awful movie ever: Porky's for Dorks, if you will. I went reluctantly.

Thank God I did though. I should have had more faith in David Fincher - he's a smart enough film maker to realise that this movie would only ever work if it focused on the genuinely extraordinary, which in this case means the birth of a new way of interacting, and the personalities that brought it into existence. This would be more than enough material to make an interesting film, but Aaron (West Wing) Sorkin's script also brings in issues of class, the generational divide, intelligence, money and the new economy. What results is a riveting, fast-paced film about the excitement of new ideas, the intoxicating rush of the succesful dot com, and the almighty high of billions of dollars, all channelled through something which all of us are familiar with and can relate to. Nothing less, then, than that rarest of beasts, a film which successfully addresses The Times In Which We Live.

The film's (already famous) opening scene shows Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) being dumped by his girlfriend, and from this we immediately learn several key things - Zuckerberg is possessed of an unapologetic, almost Asperger's-level intelligence; and he is terrible at human interaction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tallmanbaby TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Dec. 2013
Format: DVD
This film has an uphill struggle against all the hype that surrounds it, with David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin on board this should be the Citizen Kane of our generation. Furthermore nearly three hours of cinema about unlikeable characters building an internet business would be a tough sell at the best of times.

The actual films is somewhere between the hype and one's worst expectations. Until about half way it is worthy and impressive, but frankly a little dull, around the point that Justin Timberlake appears as a superficially charming pantomime villain, Sean Parker of Napster fame, it clicks up a gear, and becomes genuinely far more gripping fare.

The film does fall short in a number of areas, Fincher is for the first time shooting exclusively on digital stock here, and the cinematography is proficient rather than amazing, the script has most of the best lines from any film that decade, but at nearly three hours this is a long haul of a film. There is a narrative arc of sorts, but this is achieved by creating a pantomime villain in Parker and allowing Zuckerberg to become vastly more likeable in the second half than we had any reason to expect in the first half.

So, is it close to reality, probably not, is it a great film, not entirely, is it worth a watch, pretty definitely particularly if you like talky films about geeks.
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By BrownPolar on 17 Mar. 2015
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Millions love being on the Facebook, but would as many be interested enough in the story of its creation and in the genius behind it to while away two hours in the cinema, despite all the orchestrated hype that Hollywood marketing machine generates for any film these days?

The answer would be a resounding no from many, particularly from the older generations, but they would be rewardingly surprised how exquisitely crafted, engaging, entertaining and intellectually satisfying ‘The Social Network’ is, thanks to a magnificent script from Aaron Sorkin and to another master class in filmmaking from David Fincher, one of the most creative directors of our time.

The key to its considerable success at the box office is largely attributable to the way the plot uncompromisingly oscillates between the past and the present, instead of just chronicling a story from its beginning to the end, thereby keeping the audience arrested and absorbed throughout.

Jesse Eisenberg, for the first time in a significant, leading role, delivers a superb performance as if he was born to play this character, while Fincher exacts commendable performances from the rest of the young talents, particularly from Justin Timberlake, who appears here to be in better control than in his previous appearances.

Above all, Sorkin and Fincher commendably achieve the perfect balance between portraying genius at work, which is the film’s premise, and the youthful melodramatics that carry the usual baggage of nerdy, technological jargon, so that the film is universally appreciable. ‘The Social Network’ is surprisingly funny in an intelligent way, although not as hilarious as the ‘Big Bang Theory’!

Finally, it is refreshing to see Sony Pictures getting behind a film that is worth talking about, instead of carrying on with the trash they usually file up at Columbia!

BrownPolar
September 2011
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Format: DVD
In late 2003 Harvard undergraduate and socially awkward outsider Mark Zuckerberg is dumped by his girlfriend, sets up a malicious chain blog to humiliate her and in doing so begins the process of evolving the phenomenon called Facebook.

Although set in the ultra-modern world of cyber systems, this is in fact an old-fashioned tale of business opportunism, class distinction and the avaricious nature of money making. Despite all the computer geekery going on, its significant that much of this film takes place in corporate boardrooms where people in sharp suits help the various warring factions sue each other for billions. The point is that it doesn't matter what generation we're in - things always ends up being sorted out by lawyers in their chic offices.

The other thing rather old fashioned about David Fincher's splendid film - refreshingly so - is its delight in word play. This whole movie is a series of snappy conversations, sometimes delivered so rapidly you can barely keep up with them. Even the techie bits aren't dull. Writer Aaron Sorkin's deftly-written screenplay develops character, plot, context and motivation in a manner so witty, bitchy and erudite its like a modern tribute to All About Eve. You can almost imagine the ghost of Joseph L Mankiewicz nodding his approval at the acidic one-liners and spot-on observations.

Despite the verbosity the film is never static - director David Fincher keeps his players moving; from dorm-room, bar, restaurant, apartment, classroom, office, stairwell and even the Henley Regatta, nobody is ever sitting at a computer screen for too long. It's all so visual and so fast you barely notice that various people just talk to each other for two hours.
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