The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens [Paperback]

David Brooks
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
RRP: £8.99
Price: £6.29 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
You Save: £2.70 (30%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 1 Nov.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £5.39  
Paperback £6.29  

Book Description

5 Jan 2012
NO.1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER.
This is the happiest story you will ever read. It s about two people who led wonderfully fulfilling, successful lives.
The odd thing was, they weren t born geniuses. They had no extraordinary physical or mental gifts. Nobody would have picked them out at a young age and said they were destined for greatness.
How did they do it?

Frequently Bought Together

The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens + Thinking, Fast and Slow + Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces that Shape Our Decisions
Price For All Three: £19.57

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Short Books Ltd; 2nd Revised edition edition (5 Jan 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780720378
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780720371
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 4.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 22,040 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The book everyone's talking about --The Guardian

A fascinating study of the unconscious mind and its impact on our lives... --The Economist

Brooks gets inside the head, explains how the brain works... it s like frieze-framing a novel and discussing the motivation of the characters. Fascinating... --The Evening Standard

At Westminster they should be listening hard. --The Times

A spirited and engaging book, true in its ambition and liveliness... it offers a sense of the very real limits of the assumptions that we westerners bring to life, and the possibility of radically better, more 'realistic' ways of living. --The Observer

A well-written and engaging tour d'horizon of much of the literature on brain development, male-female relationships and what factors cause people to live happy live... Readers will learn a great deal. --The Washington Times

David Brooks is one of the most prominent public intellectuals of our time, known for, among other things, his playful dissections of the lifestyles of the American elite. Here he is chasing bigger game. The Social Animal is about the modern life of our species. It explores attachment, parenting, schooling, love, family, culture, achievement, marriage, politics, morality, aging, death and much more... Brooks is a sharp, clear and often very funny writer. --The Washington Post

Sensational... The book is appealing in many ways, not the least of which is Brooks' ability to synthesize vast amounts of research and present it in a fashion that calls to mind the hilarious social satire of Tom Wolfe... it aims to change our understanding of how we function and conduct our lives. At the least, it will deepen your regard for the marvel that is the human brain. --The Philadelphia Inquirer

An uncommonly brilliant blend of sociology, intellect and allegory. --Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Truly the best road map for living one's life that I have ever read... It should absolutely be on the required reading list of every MBA program... Trust me, this is a book of 'large ideas'. --Kansas City Business Journal

Brooks has done well to draw such vivid attention to the wide implications of the accumulated research on the mind and the triggers of human behaviour. --The Economist

Brooks splices the science and the narrative with skill **** --The Scotsman

It has a sense of curiosity, a warmth rare in political literature --Guardian

Fascinating... in this unusual book, the micro physical is joined to a gentle macro philosophy: "The deeper the social relationships a person has, the happier he or she will be." --Irish Times

Interesting, readable and persuasive --Independent on Sunday

Brooks splices the science and the narrative with great skill; you get to know these people, and like bits of them and dislike other bits. It's good --William Leith, Evening Standard

Brooks gets inside the head, explains how the brain works... it s like frieze-framing a novel and discussing the motivation of the characters. Fascinating... --The Evening Standard

At Westminster they should be listening hard. --The Times

A spirited and engaging book, true in its ambition and liveliness... it offers a sense of the very real limits of the assumptions that we westerners bring to life, and the possibility of radically better, more 'realistic' ways of living. --The Observer

A well-written and engaging tour d'horizon of much of the literature on brain development, male-female relationships and what factors cause people to live happy live... Readers will learn a great deal. --The Washington Times

David Brooks is one of the most prominent public intellectuals of our time, known for, among other things, his playful dissections of the lifestyles of the American elite. Here he is chasing bigger game. The Social Animal is about the modern life of our species. It explores attachment, parenting, schooling, love, family, culture, achievement, marriage, politics, morality, aging, death and much more... Brooks is a sharp, clear and often very funny writer. --The Washington Post

Sensational... The book is appealing in many ways, not the least of which is Brooks' ability to synthesize vast amounts of research and present it in a fashion that calls to mind the hilarious social satire of Tom Wolfe... it aims to change our understanding of how we function and conduct our lives. At the least, it will deepen your regard for the marvel that is the human brain. --The Philadelphia Inquirer

An uncommonly brilliant blend of sociology, intellect and allegory. --Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Truly the best road map for living one's life that I have ever read... It should absolutely be on the required reading list of every MBA program... Trust me, this is a book of 'large ideas'. --Kansas City Business Journal

Brooks has done well to draw such vivid attention to the wide implications of the accumulated research on the mind and the triggers of human behaviour. --The Economist

About the Author

David Brooks has millions of readers worldwide from his New York Times column. His influence has only grown since the publication of his book Bobos In Paradise. In a recent profile, New York magazine called him the essential columnist of our time. He lives with his family in Washington DC.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Twee drivel 23 April 2013
By R. WEST-SOLEY TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Mostly drivel, with a (very) few nuggets of real interest. Starts off well enough, backed up by recent social-psychological research, but soon descends into a twee fairytale, which serves as little but a vehicle for the author's rightist standpoints. After racing through the first couple of chapters and thinking 'this isn't bad at all', I really struggled to stomach the rest of the book (though battle on I did!). What a shame he couldn't carry on as he started!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ambitious Journalistic Product 7 Aug 2011
Format:Kindle Edition
Firstly, for those who hope they are buying a novel, let it be quite clear that David Brooks only adopted this approach so that he could the better hang the flesh of such knowledge he has acquired about the nature of man on a familiar skeleton ! For all intents and purposes this is non-fiction.

It is not the worse for using such a subterfuge. However, I expect great things when I read a publisher's blurb that "this book will have a broad social impact and change the way we see ourselves and the world." Frankly I do not believe this work lives up to such promise !

I do not agree with people who have suggested it is badly written or poorly edited. I imagine nevertheless that English readers (and I am writing on Amazon.co.uk) will find American spelling and American politics and sport a little too intrusive. Also there are American expressions like "policy wonk" that might or might not one day become as familiar to us as a "silver bullet", but are not so yet !

The book is about social life, culture and psychology; about people's IQ and their socio-economic status. It is also about how to lead a happy and successful existence. Some of the detail is fascinating, some is predictable to the point of being boring. While David Brook's modesty is commendable there is also too much boring attribution to people like "the great business sage Peter Drucker" or "the great anthropologist Clifford Geertz". It goes on ad infinitum : "the marriage expert John Gottman", the neuroscientist Marco Iacoboni, the Austrian physician René Spitz, and believe me, I am omitting some of the best !

When you have read this book you will be able to distinguish between natural and behavioural sciences; level 1 and level 2 cognition; your head will be buzzing with words like 'underdebate' and 'protoconversation'; you will know about paradigm shifts and mental feedback loops, but I doubt whether your life will be changed.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 24 Sep 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
Interesting way of presenting ideas. Wrapped up in a story about a couple. Well worth reading. Covers emotional and social life from birth to death
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but doesn't fulfil its promises 1 May 2012
By S. Ford
Format:Paperback
This is an interesting and at times fun book, although it is flawed through excessive use of research. It could've been completed in half as many pages, and I get the impression reading it that David Brooks was desperate to bulk out his word count! His research is detailed in great depth unneccessarily, sometimes leaving me thinking "why did you have to put this in?!" His points would've stood up without it and it spoils the story.

Add to this that the book was supposed to be about 2 people, which starts off well, who then disappear off the face of the earth to be replaced by their son, the preposterously named Harold (who would call their son Harold in the 21st Century?) and Erica. Brooks goes on to describe their lives, wandering often aimlessly through a mass of stereotypes, over generalisations, completely losing the plot of Harold & Erica quite frequently, and slips in a bit of level 1 & 2 consiousness theory.

You may pick up a few things from this book by the end, but overall it singularly fails to deliver on its clever back-cover marketing, as it is not the happiest story I have ever read by far. It has moments of genius but overall fails to fulfil its potential.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Opinionated Beast 1 Oct 2012
Format:Paperback
David Brooks is a regular columnist for the New York Times who takes a conservative slant. As such, I have grown to dislike him and disrespect his apologetic point of view for loopy right wing views. But the Social Animal starts off brilliantly, bringing Brooks my respect, but ends up downright loopy.

Brooks uses fictional people's lives to illustrate what we know about the unconscious mind. To begin with, this is very well done - he uses a lot of Daniel Kahneman's ideas (see Thinking Fast and Slow)and other respected source material to tell the stroy. His fictional couple - Harold and Erica - start off interesting - and develop into conservative archetypes so untypical of anyone on the Planet Earth that Brooks shoots himself in the foot and out the other side. Think I'm kidding?

Erica is a Chinese-Mexican woman (so many of them around, right?) who leaves the ghetto to become an ace student, senior management consultant entrepreneur, corporate CEO and eventually Presidential Chief of Staff. Typical, right? She has no children and never has had any. Her WASP husband is very upper middle class, works with the consultant Erica, falls in love with her, becomes a Historical Society curator, then turns to writing History books.

These two become pawns for Brook's social point of view - that being an up the bootstraps pulling, self made minority is deeply wonderful, once Erica realises that culture gives you more advantages than money. Women should be encouraged to achieve anything in the workplace, but home will be abandoned, as will your poor husband. Harold is a Brooks surrogate, and he sounds like such a wanker, you'd like to punch him for being a weak schmuck.

So a pretty good premise is soured by the author's real, conservative agenda and narrow world view. And the critics raved!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
recommended by a friend and a very good read
Published 15 days ago by Ben Hale
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very interesting read and a innovative approach to presenting how the human animal is so social.
Published 1 month ago by W Davis
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting observations
Would recommend to a friend
Published 2 months ago by Rahul
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
excellent read
Published 3 months ago by Pade
5.0 out of 5 stars The Social Anima;
This is a truly brilliantly written book by David Brooks, I've literally just finished it today and instantly went outside to appreciate how beautiful life is. Read more
Published 4 months ago by Lawrence akin-odujobi
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating account of how humans become who we are
This is a brilliant book for those interested in understanding how humans become who they are and how we can be happier and more successful. Read more
Published 5 months ago by grandma J
3.0 out of 5 stars some interesting thoughts but too long a story, seems unstructured
some interesting thoughts but too long a story, seems unstructured
I am struggling to finish it
I am not sure id recommend
Published 5 months ago by M. Vasquez
5.0 out of 5 stars Like a very good movie
I enjoyed this book like a very good movie. Well written, some funny facts, some sad. Background story is as much interesting as authors interpretation. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Povilas N.
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating read
To be read and read again. It makes the mind boggle in a good way. Not just about success, but what we are and can be.
Published 10 months ago by M. R. Roper
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting
Loved this book, a very interesting read - makes you rethink most aspects of your own life. Worth a read.
Published 10 months ago by Miss Chloe L Newton
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback