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The Silence [DVD]


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Product details

  • Actors: Ulrich Thomsen, Wotan Wilke Möhring, Katrin Sass, Burghart Klaussner, Sebastian Blomberg
  • Directors: Baran bo Odar
  • Producers: Frank Evers, Maren Lüthje, Florian Schneider, Jörg Schulze
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: German
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Soda Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: 20 Feb. 2012
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00695B3SS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,505 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Swiss-born filmmaker Baran bo Odar directs this German murder mystery drama based on the novel 'Das Letzte Schweigen' by Jan Costin Wagner. When a teenage girl (Anna Lena Klenke) goes missing on a hot summer's night, her abandoned bicycle is found in the exact spot where another girl was raped and murdered 23 years before. The detectives assigned to the case include the newly-retired Krischan Mittich (Burghart Klaussner), who worked on the unsolved 1987 case, David Jahn (Sebastian Blomberg), a detective who has just returned to work after the death of his wife, and the heavily pregnant Jana Gläser (Jule Böwe).

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 25 Mar. 2013
Format: DVD
This film is a little gem. If you loved The Killing this is one to watch. As several reviewers have pointed out the beginning is hard to get through but for me it is not the pace but the subject matter that causes this. Pedophilia is not a feel good subject and the menacing opening shot leaves you cold and horrified as you sit through the two murder scenes at the start of the film. A young girl is raped and murdered in a beautiful summer field - by a young man and his by-standing accomplice. A quarter of a century later another girl meets the exact same fate in the exact same spot.

From the start the audience is aware who committed the first crime and it is clear that the two murders are linked. The question of the film is WHY. Why has the second murder has taken place, after such a long time and exactly who did it? The new case immediately sends ripples through the community and everyone involved in the old crime are revisiting the past. The film follows several perspectives of the story. We flit between the murderer and his accomplice, the police investigation team, and the families of the two murdered girls - the past and the present.

Its the glimpses into the personal stories and motives that makes this film special to me and I enjoyed the confident pace and the dwelling scenes. The film has many subtle stories and leaves you with lots to think about. The themes are grief, guilt and remorse.

Most characters are beautifully acted. Ulrik Thomsen (from the danish paradigme film "Festen" and "Inheritances") is brilliant.
The weakest link is the grief stricken policeman Jahn and his unrealistically thick headed boss.
Favorite scene is when the mother of the first victim knowingly invites her daughter's killer in to her house for tea and home baked cake. Such bravery and selflessness as she faces her worst nightmare and helps to (partly) resolve the case.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Jodi Dougan VINE VOICE on 1 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Silence is a dark and disturbing tale which deals with the disappearances of 2 young girls in the same small German town - 23 years apart.

The movie isn't a whodunit, the culprits of the original crime are revealed to the audience in the opening scene, but instead it focus on the affects a crime like this has on those left behind. We see the despair of Pia's mother, who has kept her daughter's bedroom the way she left it back in 1986, the frustration of the lead detective on the original case who was unable to solve the crime, and the anguish and torment of Sinikka's parents, who can do nothing but wait for news of their missing child.

This may be one of the one most atmospheric films I've ever seen, the camerawork is sublime and the character's feelings and emotions practically seep out of the screen.

The Silence isn't easy viewing, it's a tough watch right from the get go, but it is a wonderfully shot film and it's definitely worth a watch.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By D. Pearce VINE VOICE on 5 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Silence takes a lot of time to get going. That is the first thing to say, because you could quite easily give up on it in the first 15 minutes. It is a little bit like 'Prime Suspect' in that the effect of crime is more significant than the whodunnit or the motivation behind it. Why are the first 15 minutes such hard going? Well, it takes a brave film to start with two men driving around looking for a young girl to rape. It is brave because it challenges the viewer to want to know why they did it and how or if they are going to be punished. When the same chain of events repeats itself 23 years later the film is set up as an apparently simple whodunnit. Clearly the two murders are connected, but it isn't clear how.
What transpires is a modern morality play that deals with the effects of these two crimes on the police, the victims' families, the perpetrators and their families. Even if justice isn't effectively done in the eyes of the law, can it be visited upon people in another way? This is the question the film asks and there are no easy answers.
The camerawork is superb, the direction never misses a beat as it draws you in and the performances are uniformly good and unsettling. You may not rewatch this film very often, but it is well worth tracking it down and if you do it will draw you in. The only slight moan would be the subtitles, which are occasionally hard to read but even that doesn't detract from a gripping but deeply unsettling film.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Olly Buxton on 26 Sept. 2013
Format: DVD
We open onto a nondescript German apartment block - it's not Bauhaus, but it is a near thing. The shot tightens, drawing us into the repressing geometry and then closer still, into a plain door with a tiny peephole. We cut to a spinning, caged fan, and then a slowly rotating projector wheel.

Inside a dark room, two men are viewing movies of an unsavoury kind.

In a startling aerial shot, the mundane is rendered extraordinary: a square early '80s model Audi reverses out of a tight row of parallel garages. Again, constrained by the geometry of the everyday: the car, the pavings, the garages.

All of this is casually symbolic of the immutable boundaries of lives, our ordinary constraints and the blinkered paths on which we must run. There is even a hamster in a cage. It doesn't run on the wheel: it tries forlornly to escape, biting frantically at the wire. What is more, these establishing shots call to mind the familiar, shared dilemma: the private urge to overcome this linearity: the inevitability of all things. You might as well run, hamster: there's no better alternative.

This is a film about individuals battling their private urges; trying vainly to escape the irrepressible geometry of their lives. It is a film about the stultifying human architecture which forbids it.

Of course, there are good and bad ways of self-overcoming. We realise we are observing two individuals who do unspeakable things. Their bond is not close. From above we watch them go about their business, in their square car, proceeding dully along a ramrod straight blacktop, populated either side by a verdant forest. They turn off the straight path to a deserted lane by a cornfield, in pursuit of a young girl on a bicycle.
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