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The Shakespeare Code
 
 

The Shakespeare Code [Kindle Edition]

Virginia M. Fellows
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £9.99
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Product Description

Product Description

The Shakespeare Code reveals the story of codes concealed in the works of Shakespeare and other writers of his time. For over 250 years the codes were undiscovered. More than one person suffered severly for daring to speak the secrets they contain.

The codes reveal an explosive story--the hidden marriage of Elizabeth, the "Virgin Queen," murder and scandal, corruption and lies at the highest levels. And they tell the true life-story of Francis Bacon, the one who devised the codes.

The secret history could not be told in Bacon's own time, so he concealed it in code, hoping for a future when it would be discovered, when men could be free to speak and know the truth.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1436 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Snow Mountain Press (8 Dec 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0030BF2W2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #450,750 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
3.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating! Worth the £10 investment 7 Aug 2006
Format:Paperback
As someone who's always had an inkling that there's more to this idea of "Shakespeare" than meets the eye, it's enlightening and encouraging to get the details. Written in a way that really keeps you wanting to read, without even deviating from the facts -it's impressively done. I thought The DaVinci Code was good but this is way better. One of those cases where the truth is more interesting than the fiction.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, but flawed 9 May 2009
Format:Paperback
This curious book by Virginia Fellows hinges upon the belief that a hidden "code" is present in the Shakespeare plays which details the life and times of Francis Bacon, the supposed real author of the plays and sonnets, and the supposed illegitimate son of Queeen Elizabeth.

What's convincing about the book is that Will Shaksper of Stratford-upon-Avon did NOT write the works attributed to him, and that he was a mere foil and namesake for the true hidden author. Fellows also presents arguments that Will Shaksper was a lazy money-grubbing hedonist, satirized in the plays as Falstaff.

What's not convincing about the book is the presence of this extremely detailed, extremely informative, and extremely far-fetched "Code", and the voluminous "Cipher Wheel" upon which the code can supposedly be easily read and deciphered via turning wheels and scrolls. The fact is, the premise and the wheel and the presumed "ciphers" have been examined by scholars -- including noted cryptologists William and Elizebeth Friedman -- and deemed invalid.

For inquiring minds wishing to pursue the Shakespeare authorship question reliably, I recommend Shakespeare by Another Name: The Life of Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford, the Man Who Was Shakespeare, by Mark Anderson.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the author believes it, but do we? 8 Mar 2009
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The idea that Francis Bacon hid a coded biography within the works of Shakespeare and others sounds more complicated than simply being the playwriting genius, William Shakespeare. If the cipher is there (and who would believe it until they had seen it for themselves?) then it must have been put there when the works of Shakespeare where complete. I was unconvinced by Fellows book that seems to be spinning old theories without any convincing research.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating! Worth the $10 investment 7 Aug 2006
By Helen Beaufort - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As someone who's always had an inkling that there's more to this idea of "Shakespeare" than meets the eye, it's enlightening and encouraging to get the details. Written in a way that really keeps you wanting to read, without even deviating from the facts -it's impressively done. I thought The DaVinci Code was good but this is way better. One of those cases where the truth is more interesting than the fiction.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lily 27 Jan 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you think you know your Shakespeare, think again. Discover the man who should have been king, and the the country doctor who discovered his secret narrative centuries later hidden within the text of his public stories. This book reads like a novel--but it's not!
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Did you hear the latest scandal about the Bacon boy? 21 April 2010
By Shereen Khan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
With a writing style that poses a litany of questions answered by the author, V.M. Fellows, only in gushes of personal supposition that lack any real evidence, only off-handedly referring to the amazing "cipher wheel", this book reads like a gossip column from a turn of the century tabloid. The story-telling is too colloquial and the reading level is young. Fellows "recounts" scenes from Bacon's life as if she were in the room, adding fluffy drama ("[Francis] bursts into the entrance hall and finds Lady Anne just ready to go out for a ride in her fashionable new carriage."-Ch.4) and constantly implores the reader to "imagine how he must have felt" about some incident - not what one expects from a book that claims to hold factual "revelations" of Bacon's "true life story".

Regarding the cipher wheel, V.M. Fellows never describes how it might actually work and in fact dismisses the need to with an air of "trust me, I have it on good authority". At best, she cites moments when other nameless contemporaries of the good Dr. Owen (the builder of the alleged decoder under deciphered instructions also hidden by Bacon within the plays...huh?), a vicar in one instance and a Detroit news editor in another, have been convinced of its authenticity - and then ends there. But who were the vicar and the editor, what were their names and where did she find the stories? Apparently it's not worth boring the reader about but trust her, she has it on good authority.

She does describe the construction of the albatross i.e. the cipher wheel seeming to expect that its mere existence is support enough to justify the wild tale she describes therein.

Other reviews I've read here call the book "fantastic" and it is; The Shakespeare Code is a work of fantasy for it's lack of reliable citation but the yarn itself is entertaining, though it might be a frustrating or even insulting read to those who are passionate about the debate.

It's a light, hobby read for a rainy day, if one is curious but look for no answers here.
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reviewed by Amy Lignor 31 May 2007
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book explores the story of Sir Francis Bacon, the (alleged) son of Queen Elizabeth I, The Virgin Queen. A cipher wheel exists today that was used to painstakingly decode the works of Williams Shakespeare and find, within the folds of literary genius, the story of an ignored heir to the Tudor throne.

There are many adjectives I could use here, dear reader. Exciting, intriguing, beguiling - but I think I will stick with...fantastic! You will be amazed by the little known fact, (at least to most), that there are two societies (which are still in operation today) called the Stratfordians (who believe that William Shakespeare is definitely who he said he was and the much beloved writer of, well, any time period); and a group called the Baconians, who truly believe (and, in this reader's opinion) has offered a ton of information that states the case that Sir Francis Bacon was the real Shakespeare, who simply hired old Will to be the "mask" that hid Bacon's works from the Queen. Much like the Montagues and Capulets, these "families" are still battling for the real truth.

Bacon was a member, if not the originator, of a secret society of `pens'; writers who used Athena, the goddess of Athens, as their representative. The goddess of Athens, by the way, was known as the Spear-Shaker (hmm).

There is an extremely well-thought out and, fantastically presented, case for Francis Bacon, here. And, I must say, I believe that Virginia Fellows and the Baconians have a valid point. This book shows the cipher that was discovered in Shakespeare's works that make it not only real and of great historical value, but, most importantly, believable that the fiery Queen Elizabeth was at one time produced on the written page as Lady Macbeth and Cleopatra. Francis Bacon, being only one of Queen Elizabeth's unrecognized offspring, buried the "real" story in the words of `Shakespeare' so that he would not be brought before his volatile mother, accused of treason, and lose his head at the Tower of London.

Perfect, mesmerizing, deliciously fun, this book is for anyone interested in history, codes, science, literature, conspiracies - pretty much anything. This is not akin to another familiar, best-selling `Code'. It is quite real, and a work of pure genius. Let the debate begin!
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, Bacon wrote Shakespeare 3 Mar 2010
By Graham H. Jackson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have half a dozen books dealing with the code Francis Bacon hid in the plays of Shakespeare, Spenser and others to show that he wrote them. This is the most comprehensive of the books and will convince any reasonably open-minded reader.
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