The Secret Adversary (Tommy & Tuppence) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.18
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Secret Adversary Paperback – 4 Mar 1996


See all 153 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 4 Mar 1996
£90.28 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£5.01



Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; (Reissue) edition (4 Mar 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006174787
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006174783
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 10.9 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,716,699 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Torquay in 1890, Agatha Christie began writing during the First World War and wrote over 100 novels, plays and short story collections. She was still writing to great acclaim until her death, and her books have now sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in over 100 foreign languages. Yet Agatha Christie was always a very private person, and though Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple became household names, the Queen of Crime was a complete enigma to all but her closest friends.

Product Description

Review

'Refreshingly original' Times Literary Supplement

Book Description

With jobs thin on the ground Tommy and Tuppence decide to form a partnership and hire themselves out as ‘young adventurers, willing to do anything, go anywhere’. When their first assignment, for the sinister Mr Whittington, puts both of them in mortal danger, they have to use all their ingenuity and cunning to save not only their own lives but that of the mysterious ‘Jane Finn’. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 April 2001
Format: Paperback
This is the best Christie I have ever read! It is different to her usual whodunnits and yet is just as thrilling. Tommy and Tuppence, the two main characters, have been friends since childhood. In a tea room they sit and discuss the difficulties of finding work after the war and decide to start up their own adventure company, a kind of detective agency. This opens up a spiralling story of mystery and suspense. The opening prologue works really well in setting the scene. A sinking ship and a man handing over important documents to be delivered, to the appropriate people in London. This reminded me of films such as the "The Thirty Nine steps" and "The Lady Vanishes". Indeed the book has a very similar style to these films, which I enjoyed as it had a certain charm. The characters are very likeable and again owe something to the earlier mentioned films. Margaret Lockwood would make a good Tuppence and Robert Donat a perfect Tommy. Mr Brown is the illusive villain of the book, which adds another important element to the style of the story. This story was I believe, the second one Mrs Christie published, after a Poirot yarn. It seems a shame Tommy and Tuppence did not become as popular as Poirot or Marple. Tommy and Tuppence have to track down Jane Finn, a name they overheard in a tea room, that later surfaces again in a very different light. Agatha Christie once overheard a person talking in a tea room about someone called Jane Fish and she thought it would be good to use the idea of a strange name being overheard and later being used again in a different context - changing it to Finn as Fish sounded silly! The details of London in this book make it a particular delight to read. From the Lyons Tea shop to the now closed Dover street tube station, make the reader feel part of that time. I would recommend this book to all Christie fans and those more familiar with her sleuths, as these characters will be a welcome surprise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 May 2008
Format: Paperback
Although I read a great number of Agatha Christie books as a child, I never came across any from her "Tommy & Tuppence" series on my mother's bookshelves. So I thought that it might be fun to try the first of them to see what Christie's "other" series was like. And this first in the T&T series is like is a strange mix of John Buchan and P.G. Wodehouse -- it's an espionage story, but often reads like a parody of one. The title's play on the Joseph Conrad novel hints at a certain tongue in cheekiness, as does the use of every possible spy adventure cliché.

The story opens with a prologue aboard the sinking Lusitania in 1915, as a mysterious man entrusts a secret diplomatic packet to an American teenage girl. We then leap forward to 1919, where we meet Tommy and Tuppence, a pair of lovely young adults who are somewhat adrift and broke following their wartime experiences. Running into each other in London, the childhood friends cook up a scheme to advertise themselves as "Young Adventurers" for hire. Thanks to a wildly improbable coincidence (a snatch of overheard conversation), they find themselves in the midst of a plot to destroy England.

It seems that some secret mastermind has managed to unite all of England's enemies (Bolshevik Russians, defeated Germany, Irish Republicans, and the English working class) in common cause. All they need to do is provoke a general strike that will topple the government and unleash anarchy (exactly how or why this is the case is left murky) -- and the packet entrusted to the girl on the Lusitania is the key.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Aug 2002
Format: Paperback
Having startd their "Young Adventurers" agency, Tommy and Tuppence Beresford soon find themselves thrust into the world of international espionage. With only the name of a girl as possible a clue, the young adventurers meet with more danger than they bargained for, especially when it becomes clear that someone in their confidence may be working against them.... This is certainly one of the best Christie books, with plenty of twists and turns along the way. A very ingenious plot!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lauren G on 8 Oct 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I'd never heard of the Tommy and Tuppence by Agatha Christie and was eager to read it, especially as this is available for free via Project Gutenberg for those who own a Kindle.

The story follows two excitable and eager friends who set up an "adventurers agency" and are subsequently recruited for a secret government mission regarding a signed treaty that certain revolutionaries (also known as Communists) are seeking in order to instigate a mass revolt against the powers that be.

It's a typically intricate yarn from Christie that you cannot fail to be enveloped in. There is something irresistably charming about reading thrillers not only set in decades gone by, but also written in that period as they have accuracy and believability that you cannot fake. From the language to the behaviours to the setting and even the theme of the story itself, Christie manages to impart the atmosphere of the time.

Tommy and Tuppence took me a while to warm towards however towards the middle of the novel, they really came alive and their personalities began to flourish. At the start, perhaps intentionally, they come across as rather spoilt and dare I say...annoying. However, they soon begin to become three dimensional protagonists that you can relate to; certainly their endeavours (and their words!) raised a smile.

The other characters are engaging, warm and very real despite the situation and I was genuinely interested in the finale.

The plot line itself is political which is different to the other works of Christie that I have read which are more concerned with small town life and upper class privilege and the inevitable secrets that lie below it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback