• RRP: £15.99
  • You Save: £1.81 (11%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Scramble For Africa has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by bookdonors
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shipped from the UK. Paperback which reflects used condition. Friendly customer service. We are a not-for-profit Social Enterprise trading in used books to help people, charities and the environment.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Scramble For Africa Paperback – 26 Nov 1992

4.6 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£10.86
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.18
£2.80 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.18 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Scramble For Africa
  • +
  • The State of Africa: A History of the Continent Since Independence
Total price: £24.31
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus; New Ed edition (26 Nov. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349104492
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349104492
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 5.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,156 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Magnificent, vigorous, comprehensive, compulsive reading' DAILY TELEGRAPH *'Memorable history on a grand scale . . . brilliant . . . thrilling, fast moving, imaginative, coherent' INDEPENDENT *' A phenomenal achievement . . . clear, authoritative and compelling' William Boyd, DAILY TELEGRAPH *'Grim as well as gripping reading . . . Pakenham writes racily and humorously . . . a magnificent, swash buckling, blood-bolstered epic' OBSERVER

Book Description

*the full-scale story of the nineteenth-century imperial invasion of Africa

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is one of the finest historical books I have ever read and would recommend it to anyone! It was a pleasure to read and my knowledge of the European involvement in Africa has gone from strength to strength. I now find myself looking at maps of the continent and knowing which country used to be ruled by what power and how this came about. The constant flow from place to place and topic to topic means you do not get bogged down in one area of the continents history. For example you read a chapter on South Africa, then move on to the Congo and then on to Egypt, before reading some more about South Africa. A fantastic piece of historical work!
Comment 38 of 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Perhaps The Scramble for Africa is not what most people would want to read about, but having read a decent amount about post colonial Africa, I thought I'd find out just how the Imperialists got their dirty little mitts on it in the first place.

Packenham's book is majestic. Some of the subject matter in the hands of someone less skilled would become unbearable. Inter-department shenanigans of various French governments? With Packenham it's fascinating!

The book covers a huge subject, from the early explorations of Livingstone through to a time where all but Ethiopia and Liberia remained unconquered. This includes the European government machinations, the 'scientific' explorations, the missions, the wars, the capitalist exploitation and everything in between.

Startlingly, Packenham brings hundreds, if not thousands, of the central characters to life in such a small space (albeit nearly 700 pages of fineprint). Not only the well-known major players like Stanley, Leopold and Rhodes of whom we'd all heard, but people like Tippu Tip, Lugard, George Goldie and King Mwanga are all leant such an incredible depth of character.

The story is fascinating, if at times farcicle, gruesome and ditressing.

I found two factors shocking. The first is the complete lack of plan the European powers had when entering into the scramble, made worse by the frivolous tit-for-tat nature of much of the division of Africa between France and Britain. I had naively thought that a reasonably serious analysis of the continent had been undertaken prior to a systematic division largely based on resources.

The second was the shocking atrocities the Imperial governments were willing to sweep under the carpet to get what they wanted.
Read more ›
Comment 19 of 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is that rarest of historical works.
It is excellently researched, well written and once you start reading it you will not stop.
It reads like a novel and Pakenham manages to infuse what is a serious and often grim subject with a flavour of humour with his unerring turn of phrase and wit
Comment 10 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Thomas Pakenham's book is an exhaustive account of the exploration and colonisation of Africa during the 19th century. This is of course a very wide subject, but he manages to pull it off very well. Pakenham manages not to descend into a litany of dates, but really tells a proper story with all the interesting details included. My only complaint is that he does spend more time on the British activities than on some of the others which are equally worthy of attention. It's only a minor niggle however, and definitely not a reason to hold off buying the book. Overall it is a well-balanced book that doesn't try to assign blame to one or the other party.
This part of history is neglected in European history lessons, which I think is mostly because a large part of it is quite embarassing for modern readers. The arrogance and blatant disregard for the original inhabitants of the continent is breathtaking at times. On the other hand, this book left me amazed that any of the European powers had empires at all. The sheer scale of incompetence, back-stabbing and bloody-mindedness is astounding...sometimes you can't see how they managed to get anything done at all. It does make for a good story, and I'd recommend the book to anybody with an interest in African or European history.
Comment 18 of 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a very well written book covering an often-neglected (and rarely taught) era of history and area of the world.
It covers the era at the end of the 19thC when the european powers started carving up africa and attempts to answer some of the questions about why nations did this (the answer, it seems, is to stop others getting there first), and how.
Some of the detail is wonderful and you are struck by how much research Pakenham must have done. Unfortunately, in trying to cover a whole continent, Pakenham does tend to focus on the british angle and the big events at the expense of other nations, so there's a lot about the Belgian Congo, South Africa, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Sudan and Nigeria - but you're left wondering about the likes of Liberia, Libya, Senegal and others.
No one comes out particularly well, and towards the end there are some real horror stories. This is as much a lesson in politics as history, and essential reading about an area we should know more about already.
Comment 12 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When you first see this book, it looks daunting! 670 tightly printed pages! But once you get started, you can't put it Down. It tells the story from the early explores to the 1st World War, of how the European Powers explored and divided Africa between them, in a very living language, with cliff hangers at the end of chapters, and with very colorful details.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback