The Science of Miracles: Investigating the Incredible and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£13.01
  • RRP: £13.99
  • You Save: £0.98 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Science of Miracles: ... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Science of Miracles: Investigating the Incredible Paperback – 1 May 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£13.01
£5.52 £6.04
£13.01 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in The Science of Miracles: Investigating the Incredible for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (1 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616147415
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616147419
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 970,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mike B on 5 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
I always buy books on both sides of an argument to make sure I see all sides represented, and I do not miss critical arguments. But this is certainly not a book presenting the "sceptical side" to miracles.

Indeed it is wholly misrepresented because the word "science" should not be in the title, because there is none at all in the book!

It is simply the rantings of someone with an apriori sceptic position, who is not even prepared to argue the case in any rational way. He lacks any appreciation of critical thinking, he does not use any appreciation of science, and uses every straw man argument he can find. He uses any discredited argument or opinions provided only that they line up with his own.

Cant be bothered to point out the flaws, since there can be no flaws where there is no argument: but take a couple of examples.

Ignoring all his blather - take his idea of rational argument on "holy blood" - He decided, it did not look like blood to him when he saw it in a phial ergo it is a pious fraud! Yes that is his standard of argument!

Yet if he cared to study such as Buenos Aires, Sokolka, or Lanciano, ( I hoped to see him arguing against those) he would find
many forensic scientists lined up against him. I wanted to know how he argued against these cases which use cold hard scientific reasoning, but he fails even to mention them! - preferring his opinion. It did not look like blood to him (not a forensic pathologist) ergo it was not. Pathethic.

Take the mystery of the image of guadalupe. It is generally recognised the image has been tampered with, much as a recent "banksy" graffiti, has been the victim of other graffiti.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. Malcolm on 27 Jun. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very good read for level headed people not taken in easily. The author knows his subject and blows the myths away.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Forget Ghostbusters - Call or Read Joe Nickell to Investigate Claims Miraculous or Incredible 28 Jun. 2013
By Don Ardell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Introduction: The Science of Miracles

Alexander Solzhenitsyn observed, "We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable."

I'm more or less a nice person. I try not to hurt people's feelings. But, it is nearly impossible not to channel my inner Lewis Black when I encounter people who believe maniacal lunacies. How can seemingly sane people, unsupervised adults capable of dressing themselves, communicating with others, using the bathroom and even safely crossing busy intersections take any of the following things seriously?

* That Benny Hinn and/or other faith healers perform miracles.

* That the Shroud of Turin is the burial cloth of Jesus, produced by a miraculous burst of radiant energy at the moment of the Resurrection.

* That a home, forest, mountain, lake or other special place harbors certain spirits, phantoms or even beasts found in no zoos, museums or history books.

* That there are weeping icons, magical relics (e.g., the Holy Grail), miracle healing places (e.g., Lourdes), visionary experiences by humans who died briefly and then came back to life with stories about the "after-life" (occasionally with vivid details provided in best-seller-tell-all books about how real heaven is), saintly powers (e.g., the stigmata business) and machinations of The Devil (e.g., demonic possessions).

An Investigator Extraordinaire

Joe Nickell, author of "The Science of Miracles: Investigating the Incredible," has long been known and respected as a fair-minded expert at sniffing out facts and unraveling secrets. His latest book casts a scientific eye on all of the beliefs noted above and many more. It is a valuable source for all who hold faith-based beliefs. It should be read by anyone who gives so much as a microscopic glimmer of credulity to one or more of the miracle claims described in The Science of Miracles.

Joe Nickell makes a case that it is advantageous to apply doubt, skepticism and a fact-based reality perspective to all remarkable and other claims. It is not wise, he demonstrates, to embrace beliefs simply because you want certain things to be true or because everyone else around you takes them seriously. As Mark Twain often observed, faith is believen what you know ain't so.

I wish that Joe Nickell would investigate fewer incredible beliefs, the adjective in the book subtitle (absurd would be more applicable) in favor of a more ambitious agenda. The incredible or absurd claims investigated in this book are embraced by relatively few people. Why not investigate and report on scientific findings about incredible or absurd beliefs embraced by the majority of Americans?

Sure, it's good fun to mock the lunatic beliefs of those who take seriously nonsense like holy dirt, miracle statues/photos/oils and paintings, holy tears, the Madonna on a grilled-cheese sandwich, relics, angels and saints with supernatural powers, footprints made by The Devil and so on and so forth.

There really are no boundaries capable of delimiting human foolishness.

(Joe - did you really put a stethoscope on a statue of the Virgin Mary in order to determine if it exhibited heartbeats as some pilgrims claim concerning an apparition site in Conyers, GA? See page 63.)

What I'd Like to See Joe Investigate Next

How about an investigation of the efficacy of prayer and the evidence for a heaven or hell, the resurrection, the trinity, transubstantiation or, the biggest miracle of all, the validity from a science perspective of the existence of God - any god?

I dunno. Maybe Joe is at work on such a book. I hope so. If so and if he finds any science that supports any of these religions claims embraced by billions of Christians, Islamics, Jews and other all over the world, that will truly be a miracle.

If you come across a claim that is preposterous but sacred, don't call ghostbusters - Joe Nickell is the real-life, go-to-guy who is number one at shining the light of science on the darkness of superstition.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Science of Miracles 28 July 2013
By Elizabeth Strejcek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Joe Nickell Has done a really interesting examination of some of the "miracles" that are so widely believed and idolized. There is a thoroughly rational explanation for these "events" and he covers them quite completely. Very easy to read and entertaining although he does become a little repetitive covering the same "miracle" in a couple of chapters.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
No science or critical thinking in here - just rankings of an apriori sceptic. 3 Sept. 2014
By Mike B - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I always buy books on both sides of an argument to make sure I see all sides represented, and I do not miss critical issues. But this is certainly not a book presenting the "sceptical side" to miracles.

Indeed it is wholly misrepresented because the word "science" should not be in the title, because there is none at all in the book!

It is simply the rantings of someone with an apriori sceptic position, who is not even prepared to argue the case in any rational way. He lacks any appreciation of critical thinking, he does not use any appreciation of science, and uses every straw man argument he can find. He uses any discredited argument or opinions provided only that they line up with his own.

Cant be bothered to point out the flaws, since there can be no flaws where there is no proper argument: but take a couple of examples.

Ignoring all his blather - take his idea of rational argument on "holy blood" - He decided, it did not look like blood to him when he saw it in a phial ergo it is a pious fraud! Yes that is his standard of argument!

Yet if he cared to study such as Buenos Aires, Sokolka, or Lanciano, ( I hoped to see him arguing against those) he would find
many forensic scientists lined up against him. I wanted to know how he argued against these cases which use cold hard scientific reasoning, but he fails even to mention them! - preferring his opinion. It did not look like blood to him (not a forensic pathologist) ergo it was not. Pathethic.

Take the mystery of the image of guadalupe. It is generally recognised the image has been tampered with, much as a recent "banksy" graffiti, has been the victim of other graffiti. So It is not an argument for why the parts which are unexplained , can be argued away. Yet that is mostly what he presented. The actual scientific arguments he does not challenge at all.
Take the age of the fabric which should have rotted in years not centuries (he does not mention how it survives)

And take the most interesting feature of the images in the eyes - the extraordinary triple image with correct optical distortion - an effect discovered in opthalmics only recently. How was it an artist managed to convey it long before it had been discovered.
He does not even comment on it, preferring "he does not see the likenesses of figures in the images" (irrelevant to the spatial distribution) ergo it is pious fraud in his opinion. Pathetic.

The only references he can find to support his case, are links to other rantings by him, and other discredited scientists..

Dont waste your money. I buy hundreds of books , and this is quite the worst I have ever seen.
Sure there are pious frauds, but you will not find out about them from Nickell -I suggest you find someone with an ounce of scientific knowledge and reasoning instead.

I was conned by the title.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Interesting book 21 Jan. 2014
By Harv - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fairly well written book that systematically takes on all sorts of different "Miracles", and one by one fairly well debunks them.
2 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Bad, really bad. 14 Oct. 2013
By Jose Sante - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Without a doubt, the worst-written book I've ever owned. In fact, I don't believe this book has been intentionally "written" by anyone.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback