Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop Now Shop now

The Savages 2007

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(17) IMDb 7.2/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

A sister (Linney) and brother (Hoffman) face the realities of familial responsibility as they begin to care for their ailing father.

Starring:
Laura Linney, Tonye Patano
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 53 minutes
Starring Laura Linney, Tonye Patano, Peter Friedman, David Zayas, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Philip Bosco, Gbenga Akinnagbe, Cara Seymour
Director Tamara Jenkins
Genres Drama
Studio 20TH CENTURY FOX HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 26 May 2008
Main languages English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By rob crawford TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 3 July 2011
Format: DVD
This is a moving journey into the lives of two very real siblings. Faced with the unexpected responsibility of dealing with a father who barely deserves their meagre emotional resources, they deal with the problem, with each other, and with their lives.

Like many people in real life, there is no simple resolution, no uplifting revelation, no emergence: they just move on to the next struggle, with some hope. It is that that makes this a first rate film, that it can be believed and experienced - and it certainly reflects what most of us know at one time or another.

Hoffman and Linney are absolutely wonderful. Their relationship is difficult and you can feel the tension that continues, even though the details are only alluded to rather than spelled out. You simply feel for them, you don't judge them or laugh at them. It is realism at its very very best. Individually, their lives are also not easy, but to say they are losers or crippled like some reviewers have here is an over-statement: like many of us, they are wounded and doing the best they can.

Then there is the father, whose behavior and sins are only to be guessed. He is a shell of a man, sometimes lucid, sometimes slipping into the kind of evil you suspect he perpetrated. Yet they still feel some love and caring for him and take their responsibilities seriously. It is a painful spectacle, but very real.

Recommended. This is a splendid journey into areas rarely covered by film, without frills or silly plot twists.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
I didn't find anything sad in this film. Indeed it was the height of civilisation. Unlike in pre-civilised or backward undeveloped cultures or stages of humanity (the sort we are now commonly urged to revere and admire while correspondingly denigrating from within Western Civilisation) I saw in this film, when you break it down, nothing but reassuring normality. I was surprised when Philip said in the special feature he thought there was something abnormal in the heart of this family which was what drew him in. Sorry, Philip....I go with Larkin on this one, it isn't abnormal but strangely and reassuringly normal: "...they fxxk you up"! How else could each generation swim away and turn out differently? The really creepy families are the ones where the siblings say their mums and dads are their best friends! Yuk!

Here, and I do not think this is an Indie film, it is too cosy, too conventional, timid and comfortable for that - we are here treated to a loving son and daughter who's differences are mild and never amount to more than a sardonic smile or shrug of the shoulders. They are remarkably together and sharing in their approach to the family situation and how to somehow carve the best deal from what is available for their ailing parent. Are families in this situation really like that, or am I abnormal? Neither of them are deserters. In many families faced with precisely these events the full weight and worry of dealing with this issue is accompanied by family division and derogation of duty by some or nearly all of the children leaving one family member to carry the full burden...or in the worst scenario the social/public services to come up with answers.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By F. Panin on 7 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
this is life, at least a part of it. We have parents that grow older. We have our busy lives in the meantime. Parents get sick, they cannot take care of themselves anymore, while our lives go on. What to do with our parents? What to do when they even do not recognize we are their sons and daughters?
This is the story of this movie, anyone who went through similar situation will sympathize with the acting and words of the main actors here. This is not a typical US movie, I would rather call it "European": acting is minimalistic, the insight is maximum - as typical of Sundance production.
Highly recommended, but do not expect to have a fun viewing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eclectic Reader on 10 Aug. 2008
Format: DVD
The Savages is the story of two adult children grappling with the care of their father as he faces the final phase of his life after his second wife dies, leaving him homeless and suffering from dementia.

This eventually inescapable but normally avoided subject is treated with honesty, intelligence and mild humour by writer and director Tamara Jenkins who apparantly draws from her own experience.

Having been very close to an elderly relative who suffered dementia and involved in the guilt ridden, heart-wrenching decisions that go with taking control of another person's life - many of the scenarios, characters and settings were deeply familiar to me. However I was even able to chuckle and see the funny side to a lot of the plot and although it brough up feelings and memories it was a chance to validate and re-evaluate. More saddening to me than the decline of the elderly father was the unfulfilling lives being led by the early middle aged children, who had so much life left to live.

The subject may be a bit close to the bone for anyone with an infirm or elderly parent but for me it was a chance to look it in the face and smile at the lighter side of the inescapable.

And if you like this - you must watch Away From Her.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews