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The Saturn myth Hardcover – 1 Jan 1980


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 419 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday (1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385113765
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385113762
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 14.7 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,582,421 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Drew on 27 Nov 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Probably the most fascinating, interesting and thorough mythological treatise I have ever had the pleasure to read. Furthermore, the book was written before his further researches discovered the causes and mechanisms behind the events testified to in this research. Shear genius. The ancients have something profound to tell us about the history of this planet, just as soon as we start to listen, follow the evidence and, most of all, forget the assumptions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SmokeNMirrors on 13 Jan 2014
Format: Hardcover
Intrigued by Velikovsky's claim that Saturn was once the pre-eminent planetary god, David Talbott resolved to examine its mythical character. "I wanted to know," he wrote, "if ancient sources had a coherent story to tell about the planet . . . I had no inkling of the spectacular tale hidden in the chronicles."

In this startling re-interpretation of age-old symbolism Talbott argues that the "Great God" or "Universal Monarch" of the ancients was not the sun, but Saturn, which once hung ominously close to the earth, and visually dominated the heavens.

Talbott's close textual and symbolic analysis reveals the fundamental themes of Saturn imagery and proves that all of them--including the "cosmic ship", the "island at the top of the world", the "eye of heaven" and "the revolving temple"--were based on celestial observations in the northern sky. In addition he shows how such diverse symbols as the Cross, "sun"-wheels, holy mountains, crowns of royalty and sacred pillars grew out of ancient Saturn worship. Talbott contends that Saturn's appearance at the time, radically different from today, inspired man's leap into civilization, since many aspects of early civilization can be seen as conscious efforts to re-enact or commemorate Saturn's organization of his "celestial" kingdom.

A fascinating look at ancient history and cosmology, The Saturn Myth is a provocative book that might well change the way you think about man's history and the history of the universe.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
foundations for a new comprehensive religious theory 4 Jun 2000
By Marinus Anthony van der Sluijs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Talbott has laid the cornerstone for a revolutionary and brilliant approach towards explaining mythology and ritual from a historical point of view. His work is clear and convincing, though several details cannot be maintained. Unlike Velikovsky's he works his ideas out in detail and opens the way for multitudes of new ideas. This book might even exceed Velikovsky's work in importance as it does certainly so in scope.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A real paradigm-buster 13 Jan 2014
By SmokeNMirrors - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Intrigued by Velikovsky's claim that Saturn was once the pre-eminent planetary god, David Talbott resolved to examine its mythical character. "I wanted to know," he wrote, "if ancient sources had a coherent story to tell about the planet . . . I had no inkling of the spectacular tale hidden in the chronicles."

In this startling re-interpretation of age-old symbolism Talbott argues that the "Great God" or "Universal Monarch" of the ancients was not the sun, but Saturn, which once hung ominously close to the earth, and visually dominated the heavens.

Talbott's close textual and symbolic analysis reveals the fundamental themes of Saturn imagery and proves that all of them--including the "cosmic ship", the "island at the top of the world", the "eye of heaven" and "the revolving temple"--were based on celestial observations in the northern sky. In addition he shows how such diverse symbols as the Cross, "sun"-wheels, holy mountains, crowns of royalty and sacred pillars grew out of ancient Saturn worship. Talbott contends that Saturn's appearance at the time, radically different from today, inspired man's leap into civilization, since many aspects of early civilization can be seen as conscious efforts to re-enact or commemorate Saturn's organization of his "celestial" kingdom.

A fascinating look at ancient history and cosmology, The Saturn Myth is a provocative book that might well change the way you think about man's history and the history of the universe.

Suggested further reading:
God Star, Flare Star, Primordial Star and Metamorphic Star by Dwardu Cardona
Solaria Binaria by Alfred de Grazia
The archives of Aeon, Kronos & related journals, available at www dot catastrophism dot com
In The Beginning by Immanuel Velikovsky, unpublished, available online at www dot varchive dot com

See also:
Symbols of an Alien Sky
Remembering the End of the World, both available on YouTube

Note: There is a Kindle version available to download from various torrent sites, for those who find the £300+ price tag excessive...
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Origins of religion convincingly explained 24 Oct 2012
By Puff 'n Grunt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is not a quick read nor particularly well-written but it is a well-documented and an immensely powerful argument for the early gods of pre-history being cosmic entities that were in fact the planets. The world mountain, the cosmic tree and other mythological aspects are explained in scientific terms. Is Talbott correct? I am fairly sure he's on to something important. I know I can never view traditional astronomy or even the present concept of religion in the same light after spending time with this book. Too bad it's out of print but my library got me a copy.
9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Myth as Mystery 18 April 2001
By David A. Grandy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
David Talbott has written a well-researched, interesting, and provocative book. At one time Saturn was much more visible than it is now; it rivaled the sun in its visual splendor and thereby tugged on the human imagination with comparable force. The difficulty with this picture of the past is that Talbott never explains how Saturn subsequently ended up as a small point in the sky lacking all the grandeur it supposedly once possessed. One can only guess at a Velikovsky-type scenario, but this is not plausible from an astronomical point of view. Talbott, with much learning, seems to be writing between the cracks of ancient Near East history and modern physical science, and his thesis lacks scientific backing. I suspect it also fails to persuade Egyptologists and ancient Mesopotamian scholars--those best situated to pass judgement on its historical and mythic content. This is to say that it is highly idiosyncratic. Still, it is much more stimulating and responsible than Velikovsky and von Daniken. Sometimes its fun to turn the kaleidoscope and Talbott lets you do that.
8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Additional info for the description 19 Mar 2001
By Holy Olio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"In the earliest age recalled by the ancients the planet -- or proto-planet -- came forth from the cosmic sea to establish dominion over the entire world. The planet-god ruled as the solitary, central light, worshipped as the god One -- the only god in the beginning.
"Saturn's epoch left a memory of such impact that later generations esteemed the god as the Universal Monarch, the first and ideal king, during whose rule occurred the prehistoric leap from barbarianism to civilization. Throughout Saturn's era of cosmic harmony no seasonal vicissitudes threatened man with hunger or starvation and men suffered neither labor nor war.
"Saturn 'came forth in overwhelming splendour. In the land it became day.' This does not equate Saturn with the 'sun on the horizon.' It means that the coming forth of Saturn inaugurated the archaic day, which began at sunset. So long as the solar orb was visible, the fiery globe of Saturn remained subdued, unable to compete with the sheer light of the former body. But once the solar orb sank beneath the horizon, Saturn and its circle of secondary lights acquired a terrifying radiance." -- excerpt, from the dust jacket
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