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The Sandman: Season of Mists (The Sandman Library, Vol. 4) Paperback – 1 Sep 1992


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Titan (1 Sept. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852864478
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852864477
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 1.1 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 357,976 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Neil Gaiman is a tour de force of creative talent. He is the bestselling author of Coraline and Stardust, both of which are major motion films. Neil also co-wrote the script for Beowulf starring Anthony Hopkins and Angeline Jolie. He is the creator/writer of the award-winning Sandman comic series and has written several books for children. His latest title, The Graveyard Book, won the Teenage Booktrust Prize 2009. Neil has been immortalised in song by Tori Amos, and is a songwriter himself. His official website now has more than one million unique visitors each month, and his online journal is syndicated to thousands of blog readers every day.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 April 1999
Format: Paperback
Season of Mists is probably the best of the Sandman series of collections. It is the point at which the Sandman series of comics raises itself from the level of the grue and gothic of old 1950s horror comics and becomes something quite trancendent.
The story rests on an intriguing principle: The Devil is quitting hell. He's had enough, and is giving the personnification of Dream the key, to deal with as he wishes. The place is described as 'prime psychic real-estate', and is emtied of its previous inhabitants. On Earth, the dead souls drift ailessly back into their own life patterns. Meanwhile, Dream finds a crowd of prospective buyers at his door, including gods from virtually every world mythology, as well as faeries and angels. Deals are offered, many story threads are begun, and we are introduced properly to Dream's family, the Endless: Desire; Despair; Delerium; Destiny and Death, a cute Goth chick without a scythe in sight.
Gaiman's charm lies in his twists on popular mythology (e.g. Death), the complexities of his plots and the recurrence of sympathetic characters in stories that seem initially separate. Esoteric occult horror blends seamlessly with gritty drama and men in neon spandex to produce a varied and fascinating story that the reader cannot help but be drawn into.
The Sandman series benefits greatly from the comic-book format. Gaiman is a fantastic writer of comics, there is no doubt about that, and his forays into screenplay and novel writing (with the notable exceprtion of Good Omens, co-written with Terry Pratchett) have never proved as polished. Even if you are not a reader of comics, I would unhesitatingly recommend this for anyone who has ever enjoyed Clive Barker, Anne Rice, Terry Pratchett, C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton or Edgar Allen Poe.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
If you read only one Sandman novel in your life, let it be this one. Although some background reading is advised it is not necessary, all you need is an open mind to accept the extreme intermingling of theology and mythology - past AND present, and an open heart to welcome the characters that will touch it in ways you would never expect "comic" book characters to ever do.
You cannot help but feel sorry for Morpheus, as he wanders around his palace with his lonely wistful eyes. A romantic at heart, he desperately craves the comfort and solitude found in companionship, but his fate as set out by his brother Destiny, is to self-destruct any chance he has of finding true happiness before his end.
It is this pain and stubborness that leds to the beginning of this beautiful tale, of cruelty, of the subconscious of man, and eventually to betrayl and redemption. God in this world, is cruel but loving, and will not hestitate to sacrifice one of his own to equalise the balance in the world.
The resolution of the story is at once complete and incomplete. Although Gaiman's tale has been told, it leaves us aching for more, a very rare sign of an extremely good writer,which of course, is what Gaiman is.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ryuto on 28 Aug. 2007
Format: Paperback
I'm new to the genre and so feel qualified to give an more lucid account of this series than the 'avid fan' who believes Gaiman can do no wrong.

They are potentially very good indeed: excellently drawn and presented and the story builds extremely well, introducing characters and even sub-plots that aren't directly to do with the main story, but give the context of the whole-a nice tool. What lets this down is the ending. It whimpers and limps to an unsatisfying ending that left me rather empty and cold. This is rapidly becoming my feeling about the whole Sandman series up to this point and it's such an all-pervading feeling that I'm considering not bothering to read the rest of the series. Perhaps I'm missing something, but I suspect not, because I find Gaiman's 'Death' graphic novels (a spin-off character) much more satisfying in every way an the most salient difference between the Death books and the Sandman series are the endings.

In conclusion, this is well presented in every way, but if you like resolute endings where you can sit back and feel contented, then I believe you'll be slightly disappointed with this book. If you like a vagueness to the conclusions of your reading-and some do- then jump in with both feet.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Aug. 2008
Format: Paperback
The fourth Sandman collection finally follows up on the promise that Lucifer made to destroy Morpheus back in the opening collection. Destiny summons the Endless to a meeting, where we meet Delirium (who used to be Delight) for the first time and get some more information about the missing brother of the Endless. During the meeting Desire baits Dream about the treatment of his lover Nada, whom he banished to Hell for spurning him. Dream realises he/she is right, and resolves to travel to Hell and rescue his former lover, despite Lucifer's vow.

Season of Mists takes Dream on a journey into Hell and a confrontation with the Morningstar...but not the type of confrontation he was expecting. Dream ends up, slightly bemused, as the keeper of the key to Hell, and is soon being petitioned by gods and representatives from many pantheons (including the gods of Chaos and Order, and deities from the Egyptian, Norse and Japanese pantheons) anxious to get their hands on the finest plot of real estate in the multiverse, at the same time as he is also trying to find his missing love, and Death is attempting to repair the damage caused by countless legions of the dead suddenly being released back into the mortal world.

After the short story interlude of Dream Country, it's good to be back to a solid, long story arc. Although it's a reasonably long tale it's not the most dynamic story in the Sandman canon, and unusually most of it takes place in the Dreaming with only a few scenes set in the real world, and a longer chunk set in Hell. This allows us to see a bit more of the Dreaming and its inhabitants, but the meat of the story is seeing how the different pantheons interact together and who actually has the best claim on Hell.
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