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The Sandman Library Volume V: A Game of You: 5 Paperback – Sep 1993


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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; Gph edition (Sept. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563890895
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563890895
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 0.9 x 25.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 896,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. P. de Rosnay on 10 Aug. 2004
Format: Paperback
In A GAME OF YOU the focus shifts from the Sandman to woman named Barbara, who gets drawn back into a world which she, as a child, had frequented. The cast of characters are wonderful. There are the inhabitants of Barbara's dream world who are suitably comical, noble and mischievous. There are also the residents in Barbara's block of flats: The feisty Wanda, a woman who was born in a man's body; Thessaly, a superior-acting witch; sensitive Hazel and tough Foxglove (who are a couple); creepy George and the listless Barbara. Gaiman does excellent work with these characters, as he explores them in depth and they each develop as the plot progresses.
The story grew on me as I read it. At first I didn't like it so much, there was a subtle menace and darkness and maybe I'm just a sissy but too much of that kind of thing wears me down. But the story was so interesting - quietly so - you know, in unobvious way. The mystery builds wonderfully and the intricate plot develops so gently and subtly up to its conclusion, which is beautiful and perfect. The end of the story leaves one with such a good feeling because it is somewhat of an epiphany, but not one of those brief, sudden, realisations - more a realisation that is complex and deep, one that has been building momentum for a long time and finally comes together in the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lucas on 1 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
Further to what the reviews above say, this book is a story
identity, and while pretty dark, is really brilliantly written.
I won't give the story away too much, but this a kind of modern
Alice in wonderland type story, which sounds like it's been done
before, but not at this level, taking in modern feminist,social,
and gay issues. This book was suggested to me, and even if,
like me , youre not into comic books generally, this is well worth a look.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By andrew pack on 1 Feb. 2001
Format: Hardcover
A Game of You forms part of the long-running comics series, The Sandman, but you knew that anyway. This is the only one that can really be read entirely on its own, without unexplained mysteries nagging away at you.
It's a story of Barbie, a woman who seems an airhead bimbo, but who lives the most wonderfully crafted and intricate dreams, in a land of danger and intrigue. The book shares its time equally between dreams and reality, dealing with Barbie's dream-companions - a parrot called Luz, a monkey named Prinado and a rat in a press-hat and trenchcoat called Wilkinson; in the real world Foxglove and Hazel, Wanda who wishes she was a woman and the odd Thessaly who is much more than she seems.
During the course of the book, themes are picked up and played on with great subtlety, the main one being one of identity and gender. The author pulls off the great trick of making the reader empathise totally with some quite off-the-wall characters and once we start to love them, begins to wield the axe.
Watchmen is the finest comic ever written, but parts of A Game of You come close; one of the few even of the much-vaunted adult comics that get you emotionally hooked.
And the dialogue - oh, how it sizzles. If you take a pencil to a Raymond Chandler novel and try to cut out any wasted words you can't do it, and the same is true of this. There isn't a single line of dialogue, a single word of description that doesn't carry its weight and hold additional resonance second time around.
Believe me, there will be a second time around.
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Format: Paperback
I'd be lying, if I said I opened the pages of this book, the fifth story in the acclaimed Sandman graphic novels, with excited expectation. From what I had read, many considered this the weakest of the series. Gaiman, himself, has named it as his favourite and it isn't difficult to see why. 'A Game of You' follows Barbie, who first appeared in the 'The Doll's house', as she re-enters the world of her childhood dreams. One of Gaiman's greatest gifts as a writer is taking characters who could appear at first appear two-dimensional and turning them in to real human beings.
Despite the macabre and fantastical world Gaiman creates, the characters who inhabit it always feel real and more importantly the reader always cares about them. Like 'The Dolls House', we are in this story introduced to a whole cast of new characters who all feel flawed yet likeable for that very reason. Despite the fact many of them are unlikely to ever hold any significance in the Sandman universe, they are all as important as any other characters. Through their dreams, Gaiman shows us his characters hopes, fears and ambitions.
The ending to this story is perhaps the most touching moment and admittedly this is closest I've ever been to tears by a comic book. 'A Game of You' is about the nature of story-telling and the fact that all things must come to an end. Obviously, this is an absolute must for anyone who enjoyed the previous editions. It makes my mind boggle to consider that anyone considered it the weakest.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
Do you remember Barbie? Not the doll, but the creepily perky blonde from "The Doll's House" who had a matching husband named Ken. Well, she's the protagonist of the fifth "Sandman" collection, which is accurately titled "A Game of You" -- a haunting, fairy-tale exploration into a young woman's dreaming imagination, and the friends who are trying to save her.

Having split from Ken, Barbie has since moved to New York and is living in a small apartment building with a lesbian couple named Hazel and Foxglove, a kindly M-to-F transsexual named Wanda, a creepy guy, and a prim mystery woman named Thessaly. She also hasn't dreamed in two years.

But then she has a run-in with an imaginary creature from her childhood, who gives her the magical jewel called the Porpentine with his dying breath. And that night, she goes back into a fantasy world from her childhood -- a place of talking animals, haunted forests, and a mysterious enemy called the Cuckoo.

But as Barbie (aka Princess Barbara) sets out to defeat the Cuckoo, Thessaly wakes Foxglove, Hazel and Wanda, and reveals that Barbie is in desperate need of their help -- and uses her magic to open a gateway to the realm of dreams. But they may not be in time to save Barbie from the machinations of the Cuckoo -- or New York from the destructive magic being stirred.

In most authors' works, supporting characters are just window dressing for the main characters. In Neil Gaiman's works, every character has their own unique backstory and purpose in the plot -- Barbie was just one of the minor background characters in a previous story, but in "A Game of You" we discover her dreams, her past, her fears, and her own connection to the Dream King.
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