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The Saint Steps In (Saint 24) Paperback – 19 Dec 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Mulholland Books (19 Dec. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444766325
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444766325
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 250,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

The Saint is back - the thirty-five original books starring the debonair classic crime hero are being republished in print and ebook with new introductions and extra content.

About the Author

Leslie Charteris was born in Singapore and moved to England in 1919. He left Cambridge University early when his first novel was accepted for publication. He wrote novels about the Saint throughout his life, becoming one of the 20th century`s most prolific and popular authors.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Magnussen on 19 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
Perhaps the dreariest of the full-length Saint novels.

Of the wartime stories, Charteris said (perfectly reasonably) that 1) to be at all credible, the Saint's contribution to the war effort had to be minuscule, and 2) he didn't want the Saint doing things more heroic than many ordinary people were doing every day in real life.

Certainly it would be farcical to have (for instance) Simon breaking into the Berghof and punching Hitler on the nose. Even so, it seems bizarre that a skilled pilot who can pass for German (as he does in Getaway) should be spending his time trying to get attention for a formula for artificial rubber, as he does here*.

Charteris's writing never falls below a certain minimum level of competence, and the villains don't quite descend to the "Ve haff vays of making you talk" level, but this is just plain dull.

*Indeed, in a couple of post-war stories (e.g. "The Covetous Headsman") there are passing references (no more) to wartime exploits in Europe.

P.S. For a list of all Charteris's Saint books (in two sections, because of length limitations) see my Listmanias.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Beautiful women, crime, Nazis, death, hijinks and too much scotch. 18 Nov. 2014
By Rhett Redelings - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A fan of the old RKO films starring Louis Hayward and George Sanders, the 1960's series with Roger Moore, the 1970's "reboot" (or is it a continuation?) with Ian Ogilvy and even of the radio show with Vincent Price, I could never really connect with Simon Templar, the impossibly perfect superman, awesome in every possible way, as written in the early stories which, until recently, were the only original Leslie Charteris-penned Saint stories I could find. I'm sure the best fans of Simon Templar would declare me the Ungodly and strangle me with their halos for saying this but the early Saint stories read like transcriptions of a good pub yarn but the characters are thin and the plots, while inventive for the genre, seem like a pastiche more than real stories.

With that in mind, I deliberately bought The Saint Steps in because it comes later in Simon Templar's life where he, and his writer, have grown up enough to care about something in the world. The Simon Templar in this book reminds me more of George Sanders' characterization than any other but this Saint is smarter, meaner and more politically incorrect than any of his celluloid interpretations ever could be. In The Saint Steps in, it is the middle of World War II, he is middle aged, tired, world weary, flirting dangerously with respectability and drinking truly incredible amounts of booze but he still has a love of adventure an irrepressible sense of humor. The other characters in the book, while not necessarily as richly drawn, still feel like real people.

The Saint is not at the top of his game here and the danger feels real; when Templar hurts, you hurt for him. It is not at all clear how the story will resolve itself nor that The Saint and all he cares about will prevail, 'though, of course, you know he must... there are other books in the series.

My favorite part of the book, and possibly the most relevant, is an argument Simon Templar has with the big bad about the role of big business in a modern democracy. It's a chance for Leslie Charteris to get on his soap box and, through his characters, he argues his point of view. In a way, that's what this story is about. But it's also about beautiful women, crime, Nazis, death, hijinks and too much scotch.
Saint Saga #24 6 Jan. 2014
By Paul Magnussen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Perhaps the dreariest of the full-length Saint novels.

Of the wartime stories, Charteris said (perfectly reasonably) that 1) to be at all credible, the Saint's contribution to the war effort had to be minuscule, and 2) he didn't want the Saint doing things more heroic than many ordinary people were doing every day in real life.

Certainly it would be farcical to have (for instance) Simon breaking into the Berghof and punching Hitler on the nose. Even so, it seems bizarre that a skilled pilot who can pass for German (as he does in Getaway) should be spending his time trying to get attention for a formula for artificial rubber, as he does here*.

Charteris's writing never falls below a certain minimum level of competence, and the villains don't quite descend to the "Ve haff vays of making you talk" level, but this is just plain dull.

*Indeed, in a couple of post-war stories (e.g. "The Covetous Headsman") there are passing references (no more) to wartime exploits in Europe.

P.S. For a list of — and discussion of — all Charteris's Saint books, see my So You'd Like To... Guide.
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