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The Saint in Europe Hardcover – Oct 1987


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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Amereon Ltd (Oct 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0891903879
  • ISBN-13: 978-0891903871
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,509,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

The Saint is back - the thirty-five original books starring the debonair classic crime hero are being republished in print and ebook with new introductions and extra content.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Leslie Charteris was born in Singapore on May 12th, 1907. With his mother and brother, he moved to England in 1919 and attended Rossall School in Lancashire before moving on to Cambridge University to study law. His studies there came to a halt when a publisher accepted his first novel. His third book, entitled Meet the Tiger!, was written when he was twenty years old and published in September 1928. It introduced the world to Simon Templar, aka the Saint.

He continued to write about the Saint until 1983 when the last book, Salvage for the Saint, was published. The books, which have been translated into over thirty languages, number nearly a hundred and have sold over 40 million copies around the world. They’ve inspired, to date, fifteen feature films, three TV series, ten radio series, and a comic strip that was written by Charteris and syndicated around the world for over a decade. He enjoyed travelling but settled for long periods in Hollywood, Florida, and finally in Surrey, England. He was awarded the Cartier Diamond Dagger by the Crime Writers’ Association in 1992, in recognition of a lifetime of achievement. He died the following year.

To find out more about Leslie Charteris and his work, visit www.lesliecharteris.com.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Magnussen on 29 May 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is easily the best of the post-war collections of short stories, of which there are seven: they are set in Paris, Amsterdam, The Rhine, The Tyrol, Lucerne, Juan-les-Pins and Rome.

Of these stories, my favourite is the fourth, "The Golden Journey". But "The Spanish Cow" is sheer entertainment, even though the Saint comes perilously close to becoming a gigolo. And "The Rhine Maiden" at least is a return to the old, pre-war Saint.

P.S. For a list of all Charteris's Saint books (in two sections, because of length limitations) see my Listmanias.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Barrance on 5 May 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Its about 58 years since I first read this book and I enjoyed it just as much as the first time around, despite that its writing is quainter than contemporary styles.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Adventure pursues him, not the other way round 2 Feb 2002
By Michele L. Worley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I should mention that the Saint (a.k.a. Simon Templar) began his career by boldly seeking out adventure, and after awhile, it began coming to him. Templar mentions from time to time (e.g. in "The Elusive Ellshaw" in _The Saint Goes On_) that he also attracts women looking for lost dogs, con men looking for a mark, and a public who generally see him as "something between a benevolent if weak-minded uncle and a miracle-working odd job man." He's adept at sorting the wheat from the chaff to find profitable adventures.
"The Covetous Headsman" (Paris) - The headless body of a shipping office clerk was found in Paris - but the decapitation took place after death. Templar uses some of his old Resistance connections to solve the mystery. Note that this isn't a mystery story as such; Templar's problems generally have only 1 suspect, and aren't arranged to ensure that the reader necessarily has a fair chance at guessing things. Incidentally, the fictional story mentioned in passing is G.K. Chesterton's "The Secret Garden", from _The Innocence of Father Brown_.
"The Angel's Eye" (Amsterdam) - A respectable-looking middle-aged couple approach Templar in a restaurant with a problem. The diamond cutter to whom they just delivered the Angel's Eye for recutting (on behalf of a firm of jewelers) now denies that he ever heard of it or them.
"The Rhine Maiden" (The Rhine) - This is Templar's private label for a girl met on a (train) journey along the Rhine - a girl with an aura of enchantment about her, traveling with her newly retired grandfather. (His ideal of a Rhine maiden is closer to the original myth than the popular image fostered by opera singers.)
"The Golden Journey" (The Tirol) - The Saint, meeting a spoiled, beautiful girl, decides to try to salvage her, by arranging matters so that she must hike overland with him to Innsbruck. While this is an unusual tack for him to take, there are precedents - "The Sleepless Knight" and "The Man Who Was Clever", for instance. Oddly enough, it also reminds me of George MacDonald's _The Wise Woman_, although stylistically they are quite different.
"The Loaded Tourist" (Lucerne) - While walking up to his hotel by the lake on a dark night, Templar fails to stop two thugs from fatally stabbing a shoe manufacturer and stealing the victim's briefcase. Following the usual investigator's tack (looking for breaks in established patterns) nets an interesting collection of observations, starting with the victim: a businessman (and looking like it) in a tourist's paradise, on the eve of his immigration to the U.S.
"The Spanish Cow" (Juan-les-Pins) - Templar doesn't rate the title of Saint here. The lady mentioned in the title is an aging, rich widow who hasn't done any harm. Templar's plan to steal her diamonds has no justification. What good he does is more accidental than intentional, at least initially. Not a bad story, but not consistent with the Saint's original swashbuckling philosophy.
"The Latin Touch" (Rome) - Back to the old Saint, fortunately. Templar casually makes the acquaintance of Sue Inverest while sightseeing in the Colosseum - only to be knocked cold when Mafia kidnappers ambush her. (The daughter of the U.S. Secretary of State, she had eluded her escort as a lark.) Fortunately, upon Templar's awakening in jail, the Secretary has not only checked his war record with the O.S.S., but is prepared to trust him rather than risk his daughter's life to cops who may be in the Mafia's pay.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Saint Saga #29 9 Aug 2007
By Paul Magnussen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is easily the best of the post-war collections of short stories, of which there are seven: they are set in Paris, Amsterdam, The Rhine, The Tyrol, Lucerne, Juan-les-Pins and Rome.

Of these stories, my favourite is the fourth, "The Golden Journey". But "The Spanish Cow" is sheer entertainment, even though the Saint comes perilously close to becoming a gigolo. And "The Rhine Maiden" at least is a return to the old, pre-war Saint.

P.S. For a list of — and discussion of — all Charteris's Saint books, see my So You'd Like To... Guide.
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