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The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart MP3 CD – Audiobook, 19 Jul 2010


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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Corporation; MP3 Una edition (19 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441868291
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441868299
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,456,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jesse Bullington's formative years were spent primarily in rural Pennsylvania, the Netherlands and Tallahassee, Florida.

He is a folklore enthusiast who holds a bachelor's degree in history and English from Florida State University.

He currently resides in Colorado, and can be found online at www.jessebullington.com


Product Description

Review

Darkly funny, profane, erudite, bawdy, and wickedly original, Jesse Bullington's The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart marks the debut of an amazing new talent. I loved it (Jeff VanderMeer)

A pair of the vilest, meanest, most murderous thugs ever to grace the pages of a fantasy novel ... This is not for the faint-hearted or the queasy - imagine Tarantino crossed with Rabelais (Guardian 'This is a tale grimmer than the grimmest of the Grimms, redolent of blood, excrement, vomit and putrefaction . As the antithesis of conventional fantasy, this is a tour de force')

Telegraph ('Raucous, lewd, and grisly')

Esquire ('The mix of grimmer-than-Grimm fairy tale tropes [.] and medieval history is striking and often funny') --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

A bloody, grim and thoroughly engaging tale of philosophical grave-robbers on the run in Mediaeval Europe. --This text refers to the Perfect Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 Dec. 2009
Format: Paperback
Written in the form of a medieval folktale compiled from various manuscripts and accounts, The Sad Tale recounts the true fate of the Grossbart Brothers, Manfried and Hegel, two of the meanest villains central Europe has ever seen. Their family background of petty thieves and graverobbers is nothing to be proud of, but having been abandoned by the uncle who brought them up, the brothers remain convinced that their family heritage and fortune lies in the sandy deserts of Gyptland and start their journey. Not without first settling accounts with a local farmer who once beat them in their youth for stealing turnips from his field, but taking revenge a little too far on his family, they end up being pursued by the farmer and other townfolk.

That's the least of their worries as the Grossbarts encounter all sorts of medieval horrors on their journey, both human and supernatural, plague-infested villages, lustful witches, man-eating half-man-half-beasts, devil-possessed hogs and the foulest demons of hell. The foul-mouthed, blasphemous, dim-witted brothers may not be the most pleasant of company throughout this journey, and their conversational skills leave as much to be desired as their manners, but they ain't stupid about knowing when something's a coming to kill 'em, and they make sure to strike first.

A sad tale it is indeed then, one of misfortune compounded by stupidity and self-delusions of near-sainthood to the extent that you almost feel sorry for these two ugly, murderous, heretical scum (though not quite as sorry as for the unfortunates they come into contact with), but it's also frequently amusing, the author taking full advantage of the fantasy-medieval setting to deliver an occasionally grim, brutal and shockingly profane adventure that's highly entertaining.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. I. Harrison on 11 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well this book is truly macabre, grotesque and perhaps even a bit sick! I loved it!

Welcome to the brutal and warped world of Hegel and Manfried. The brothers Grossbart.

Somewhat unhappy with their lot they set off to take their profession (grave robbing) to sunnier shores (Gyptland). Of course there is nothing to stop them indulging in a spot of score settling, thievery, murder and thuggary along the way. Not that they let this low down behaviour dissaude them of the view that they are doing the work of the virgin Mary! The explanation of this is best left to the brothers, but trust me it is darkly hilarious!

Along the way they come accross witches, demons, an alcaholic priest and a deranged sea Captain. If you decide to undertake this journey with them be prepared to be amused and horrified by turns or sometimes at the same time. As Manfried and Hegel earn your loathing and begrudging respect!

This is the kind of book where anything can and will happen. It's graphic and at times deeply shocking. I read the first chapter in a series gasps and profanity and most of the books I read are pretty blood splattered. There is ultra violence, sex, religeous sacrilege and the very strongest language. So you might want to avoid this if you are the kind of person who writes outraged letters to the Daily Mail.

The story is a dark comedy/horror that is not without excitement as well as shocks and laughter.
What is more remarkable is that this highly original and brilliant book is a debut novel. I will be awaiting with great interest and quite a lot of impatience for Jesse Bullington's next offering. This a stunning peice of work!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Niall Gillick on 2 April 2010
Format: Paperback
Great Book !
A Dark, graphic morbid fictional tale set in plague ridden Europe chronicling the adventures of the brothers Manfried & Hegel Grossbart. It's pretty brutal in some of its descriptions, humorous in places and wildly captivating, I simply could not put it down. I've definitely not read anything like it before.
Let's hope the two brothers somehow make a return
Absolutley worth reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rubbah on 1 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
A medieval horror novel about two brothers Manfried and Hegel who are the heroes/villains of the tale. Grave robbers by trade, they are travelling to 'Gyptland' in order to become rich as kings as they believe they're grandfather and father to have done before them. As they travel across plague ridden Europe they make more enmies than friends and encounter demons, witches and monsters, incurring the undying wrath of sevral of them who seek to follow the brothers on their journey and kill them. Strangely, depite the horrific deeds they do in the name of their twisted form of christianity, I did like the pair by the end of the book and hoped that thier journey would be fruitful. Overall a good read, but loses a star for a flagging in the pace and plot about 3/4s of the way through.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Woodward TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback
This was one of those rare occasions where I took a punt on a book purely due to its eye-catching front cover - and was utterly glad I did!

Ironically, this Medieval folk story seems quite modern in that it involves amoral characters roaming an amoral, bloody landscape. The synopsis makes it apparent that this is certainly one for the not-so-easily shocked who appreciate the blackest of humour - two grave-robbing brothers follow in the footsteps of their kin & head for the fabled rich-pickings to be had in 'Gyptland' & before they go, decide to even the score with a neighbour. But Medieval Europe is a dangerous place inhabited by bandits, witches, manticores, plagues & much, much worse...

In the comparatively civilised setting of their home town, the brothers' brutish, wretched nature is quite apparent but once their journey begins, they fit in with their new environment rather well, as they encounter no end of equally villainous characters no more enlightened or heroic than they. The characters are almost universally self-deluding & wicked, though rarely more brutal than the Grossbarts. The brothers' unique take on Christianity is also somewhat entertaining & non-canonical, as is their self-deluding opinion that they are virtually living saints. While their views would be considered heretical by the church at the time, it is typical of the murky shades of grey which colour their story that they are actually rather pious in their own way.

Those who are somewhat bored with standard 'good vs. evil' narratives featuring mindless heroes merrily slaying beasts will find this a satisfying read. It offers an uncompromising view of a savage world in which each character has to go to extraordinary lengths to survive.
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