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The Romantic Manifesto (Signet Shakespeare) Mass Market Paperback – 1 Apr 1992


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Signet Books; New Ed edition (1 April 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451149165
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451149169
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 1.4 x 17.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 112,220 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ayn Rand's first novel, We the Living, was published in 1936, followed by Anthem. With the publication of The Fountainhead in 1943, she achieved spectacular and enduring success. Rand's unique philosophy, Objectivism, has gained a worldwide audience and maintains a lasting influence on popular thought. The fundamentals of her philosophy are set forth in such books as Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology, The Virtue of Selfishness, Capitalism: the Unknown Ideal, and The Romantic Manifesto. Ayn Rand died in 1982.

(Image reproduced courtesy of The Ayn Rand® Institute)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE position of art in the scale of human knowledge is, perhaps, the most eloquent symptom of the gulf between man's progress in the physical sciences and his stagnation (or, today, his retrogression) in the humanities. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 13 Aug 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a compelling work on the nature and meaning of art. Besides containing Rand's manifesto, it is also a highly entertaining piece of criticism and analysis of art, culture and psychology.

In the introductory chapter: The Psycho-Epistemology Of Art, Rand defines art as a selective recreation of reality according to the artist's metaphysical value judgements. Art brings one's concepts to the perceptual level of conscience and enables one to grasp them directly as if they were precepts.

Chapter 2, Philosophy And Sense Of Life, deals with the "merciless recorder" that is the integrating mechanism of the subconscious mind. The next chapter, Art And Sense Of Life, opens with a fascinating observation on a hypothetical painting. Here Rand further explains the concept of a sense of life as it manifests in art. She argues that the emotion involved in art is automatically immediate and that it holds a deeply personal value-significance to the person experiencing it.

Art And Cognition is devoted to the question: What are the valid forms of art, and why? Here the author explores literature, painting, sculpture, music and architecture in turn. I find her speculations on music particularly thought-provoking.

Rand refers to Aristotle in discussing the attributes of the novel in Basic Principles Of Literature: theme, plot, characterization and style. Chapter 6 provides a definition of Romanticism, which recognizes volition, as opposed to Naturalism which denies it. She identifies determinism as the basic premise of naturalism in The Aesthetic Vacuum Of Our Age and hails the appearance of the novel in the 19th century as the vehicle of Romanticism.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 May 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm an aspiring writer. I also like Ayn Rand enough to be considered a "randroid" (love it, and props to whoever came up with it) by some. However, that aside, reading the Romantic Manifesto was truly a life changing experience. Her fiction has inspired me on many levels, but I would not say they have been life altering. However, this book, this manifesto, has shown me, in easy to understand terms, what makes good fiction, and what kind of art I want to participate in. So much of the crap that is held in esteem at my university is utterly nonintelligible. Why? Great ideas can have simple explanations. That is, I think, Rand's greatest gift. Passionate simplicity. The Romantic Manifesto contains within a blueprint for writers, a blueprint that I already carried in my heart and in my head, but lacked the words to put to paper. For the first time, I'm truly proud of what I write, and I know where it will take me. Thanks Ayn. Any aspiring writer of fiction should read this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Nov 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a compelling work on the nature and meaning of art. Besides containing Rand’s manifesto, it is also a highly entertaining piece of criticism and analysis of art, culture and psychology.
In the introductory chapter: The Psycho-Epistemology Of Art, Rand defines art as a selective recreation of reality according to the artist’s metaphysical value judgements. Art brings one’s concepts to the perceptual level of conscience and enables one to grasp them directly as if they were precepts.
Chapter 2, Philosophy And Sense Of Life, deals with the “merciless recorder” that is the integrating mechanism of the subconscious mind. The next chapter, Art And Sense Of Life, opens with a fascinating observation on a hypothetical painting. Here Rand further explains the concept of a sense of life as it manifests in art. She argues that the emotion involved in art is automatically immediate and that it holds a deeply personal value-significance to the person experiencing it.
Art And Cognition is devoted to the question: What are the valid forms of art, and why? Here the author explores literature, painting, sculpture, music and architecture in turn. I find her speculations on music particularly thought-provoking.
Rand refers to Aristotle in discussing the attributes of the novel in Basic Principles Of Literature: theme, plot, characterization and style. Chapter 6 provides a definition of Romanticism, which recognizes volition, as opposed to Naturalism which denies it. She identifies determinism as the basic premise of naturalism in The Aesthetic Vacuum Of Our Age and hails the appearance of the novel in the 19th century as the vehicle of Romanticism.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 May 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After reading several on-line reviews of Ayn Rand's books at Amazon.com, I come to realise that there are the two usual categories of people doing the reviewing: the one's who love her ideas and the one's that hate them. Fine with me, but why can't the people who hate her give any other arguments that she is 'fascist', 'dangerous' or 'takes a strong grip on her readers'? Fascist - she is not (look up a definition of fascism in any dictionary), dangerous - for whom?, and the 'grip' she delivers is a positive sense of life and that, of course, captures a lot of people. I believe that Mats Landstrom (from Sweden) and others with him should try to ask themselves what it is that they 'hate' about Ayn Rand and when doing so they will hopefully reach an answer about themselves (or of their psyche), and how they see life. Then they (hopefully) could give any reasonable, authentic 'arguments' why they dislike Ayn Rand - instead of all the predictable, untrue, and highly non-personal views.
Thanks for listening to my words. Think about them.
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