The Rise and Fall of a National Strategy: The UK and The... and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: 91.29

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Rise and Fall of a National Strategy on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Rise and Fall of a National Strategy: The UK and The European Community: Volume 1: v. 1 (Cabinet Office Peacetime) [Hardcover]

Alan S. Milward
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 110.00
Price: 104.79 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 5.21 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 15 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 22.18  
Hardcover 104.79  
Paperback 23.35  

Book Description

30 April 2002 0714651117 978-0714651118
This text analyzes British official thinking behind the UK's standing aloof from the moves after 1945 towards European economic collaboration, leading to the establishment of ECSC and the EEC in the 1950s. It deals with the later change of tack (1961), covers the organization in Whitehall for the negotiations with the Communities, and the major problem areas - the Commonwealth, British agriculture, financial implications of British membership, sovereignty, and the future of EFTA.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Spend 30 and get Norton 360 21.0 - 3 Computers, 1 Year 2014 for 24.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)


Product details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (30 April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0714651117
  • ISBN-13: 978-0714651118
  • Product Dimensions: 3.5 x 16.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,479,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To join or not to join? 8 Jun 2013
Format:Hardcover
There are few issues in postwar British politics that have proven as contentious and as vexing as that of Britain's relationship with the rest of Europe. For decades Britain has wrestled with the question of its place within an increasingly integrated continent, with the very subject of Britain's membership in the European Union regarded by many as still open for debate. Yet for others the problem was not that Britain joined Europe's unification project but that it did not join it soon enough, having passed on what in retrospect seems to have been the priceless opportunity to become a founding member of the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957. As Alan Milward demonstrates in this book, however, such arguments ignore both the problems and opportunities that faced Britain after the Second World War, ones that he sees as providing a far more complicated set of options for British policymakers than might be seen in retrospect.

Milward begins by looking at the European issues facing Britain after the end of the war with Nazi Germany. Foremost among them was the growing threat of the Soviet Union, and the consequent need (far from guaranteed) to keep the United States engaged with European defense. The Soviet challenge served as an impetus for postwar reconstruction, an effort that helped stimulate efforts towards a combined economic effort, Though Britain encouraged such efforts, her leaders eschewed any sort of long-term commitment, seeing the Empire and the Commonwealth as far more important to the British economy that a devastated and divided Europe- an understandable view given the statistics Milward provides for British trade during that period.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars To join or not to join? 8 Jun 2013
By Mark Klobas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
There are few issues in postwar British politics that have proven as contentious and as vexing as that of Britain's relationship with the rest of Europe. For decades Britain has wrestled with the question of its place within an increasingly integrated continent, with the very subject of Britain's membership in the European Union regarded by many as still open for debate. Yet for others the problem was not that Britain joined Europe's unification project but that it did not join it soon enough, having passed on what in retrospect seems to have been the priceless opportunity to become a founding member of the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957. As Alan Milward demonstrates in this book, however, such arguments ignore both the problems and opportunities that faced Britain after the Second World War, ones that he sees as providing a far more complicated set of options for British policymakers than might be seen in retrospect.

Milward begins by looking at the European issues facing Britain after the end of the war with Nazi Germany. Foremost among them was the growing threat of the Soviet Union, and the consequent need (far from guaranteed) to keep the United States engaged with European defense. The Soviet challenge served as an impetus for postwar reconstruction, an effort that helped stimulate efforts towards a combined economic effort, Though Britain encouraged such efforts, her leaders eschewed any sort of long-term commitment, seeing the Empire and the Commonwealth as far more important to the British economy that a devastated and divided Europe- an understandable view given the statistics Milward provides for British trade during that period. Instead, Britain sought to maintain a role at the center of a sort of Venn diagram between the United States, the Commonwealth, and Europe, sharing a role with each yet not being drawn into any sort of isolating commitment with any one of them. It was this attitude which led Britain to opt out of the sort of restrictive relationships entailed in the emerging Coal and Steel Community, as well as the subsequent EEC. That the EEC's emergence coincided with both the European economic boom and growing international competition for Commonwealth markets fueled almost instantaneous second thoughts after 1957, but by the time Britain sought entry into the EEC it faced the implacable opposition of Charles de Gaulle, who vetoed Britain's first attempt at entry in January 1963.

All of this Milward describes in a narrative characterized by erudition, insight and wit. His command of the sources is impressive, and he is generous enough to direct readers in his footnotes to books offering opposing viewpoints on the more contentious issues. Together it makes his book essential reading not just for those interested in Britain's relationship with the developing institutions of united Europe, but anyone wanting to learn about this pivotal point in defining Britain's postwar relationship with the world.
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback