The Right Nation: Why America is Different and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £15.99
  • You Save: £1.25 (8%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 7 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Right Nation: Why America is Different Paperback – 1 Sep 2005


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.74
£14.74 £0.01

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

The Right Nation: Why America is Different + Reading Political Philosophy: Machiavelli to Mill + Modern Political Thinkers and Ideas: An Historical Introduction
Price For All Three: £66.06

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 488 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (1 Sep 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141015365
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141015361
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 192,392 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A kind of anthropology of the conservative movement, from 1952 to today. ("The Wall Street Journal") The best political book in years. (George F. Will, "The Washington Post") The writing is consistently crisp and intelligent, the conclusions balanced?. a work of penetrating insight. ("The New York Times") "The Right Nation" is smart, witty, and a pleasure to read. ("Business Week")

About the Author

John Micklethwait is the US editor of The Economist and Adrian Wooldridge writes its Lexington column. They are the authors of A Future Perfect, The Witch Doctors and The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
SIR LEWIS NAMIER, the great historian of English politics in the age of George III, once remarked that "English history, and especially English parliamentary history, is made by families rather than individuals." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Martin Akiyama on 16 April 2006
Format: Paperback
The authors are British and cover America for The Economist magazine. The book attempts to explain how and why America has become such a conservative country. Their point of view is that of moderate conservatives who like America but find some aspects of American conservatism a bit strange.

It is divided into four parts:

The first part, History, is a history of American conservatism from 1952 until 2000, showing how we went from "Eisenhower Republicanism" to George W Bush.

The second part, Anatomy, goes into more detail about the modern-day conservative movement in America.

The third part, Prophecy, looks at the future of conservatism in America: why America is likely to become more rather than less conservative, what could go wrong for the Republicans, and how the Republican party might change due to the increasing influence of young people, ethnic minorities and women.

The fourth part, Exception, looks at why America has such a different political climate from Europe, both in being more conservative and in having such a different flavour of conservatism. There is a fascinating chapter on the historical reasons why America is so right-wing.

Finally the conclusion discusses how America and Europe might get along with each other despite their differences.

If this is sort of thing you find interesting, I would also recommend George Lakoff's books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dr. V. Stewart VINE VOICE on 13 Oct 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One wouldn't think that it was possible to so clearly analyse the rise of the New Right from so many viewpoints, and with a compelling mixture of regard for what really happened and a clear eye for ethics and consequences: but these writers have done it. Partly it's because they take the long view - way back to LBJ and the Great Society; partly because they really do treat the USA on its own terms (e.g. it's big. So if you dislike your neighbour, you could move - at least, that's the folk memory. The book is the work of loving friends; about a country which 'has come early into its full inheritance' and isn't quite sure what to do about it or even to talk to itself about it. Quite a read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. T. Pearson on 26 July 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an extremely impressive work that combines a strong central argument with an array of supporting details and examples. It is thoughtful, lucid and never strays from objectively describing the current American political landscape. It is refreshing to read a book that is thoroughly divorced from partisanship and committed to accurate political analysis. I thoroughly recommend this lively and prophetic text.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Mar 2005
Format: Paperback
Written by the Economist's US correspondents, this book is a perfect way to start exploring a better understanding of American society today. The book charts the history of the conservative movement from its origins in the southern Democratic Party, through the perceived failures of President Johnson's social policies, to the emergence of the modern Neo-conservative consciousness. The book's main thesis is that American society itself is significantly more conservative than UK/European societies: in order to understand the foreign and domestic policies of the White House under George W Bush, we must first understand that the 'Average American Joe' is likely to view the world and the role of government in society very differently from us. The truly comprehensive scope of the book is enhanced by an easy to read style and lot of humour. Overall, The Right Nation is undeniably academic, yet I enjoyed it on a beach holiday. Thoroughly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LearnedViking on 26 Aug 2007
Format: Paperback
Excellent read for anyone outside the USA who wants to understand political issues in the US. Better coverage of issues than you will conventionally get on European News channels. 10/10
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 April 2011
Format: Paperback
John Micklethwait and Adrian Woolridge are journalists writing for The Economist, and this book bears the same high quality of writing that many have come to expect from that magazine. The authors are as thorough in their research as they are clear in their presentation, and we the readers are that much better off because of it. The basic premise of the book, that the conservative power in America has been on the rise for many decades, is an indisputable fact of political life, and will be for many more years to come regardless who the occupant of the White House will end up being. The book deals with the roots of this phenomenon, and tries to present it as objectively and critically as possible. It shows how American conservatism is unique, and would probably not be recognized as traditional conservatism in many other parts of the world. Many critics may find it objectionable and problematic that the authors take this American conservatism seriously at all, but even those critics could benefit tremendously from reading this book. If their aim is to get to know the enemy, this book would be the best place to start. Even though the book was first published around the 2004 elections, it will probably remain relevant for many years to come.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback