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Comment: A1: Beneath The Balcony 3:28 A2: The Sea And The Rhythm 5:22 A3: The Night Descending 3:12 B1: Jesus The Mexican Boy 4:54 B2: Someday The Waves 4:14 - small crease on front cover
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The Sea & the Rhythm [VINYL]


Price: £11.43 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£11.43 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
Amazon Has Certified That This Packaging Is Frustration-Free
This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.

Amazon's Iron & Wine Store

Music

Image of album by Iron & Wine

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Biography

Over the course of his ten-year career, Iron and Wine's Sam Beam has become one of today's greatest story tellers, crafting meticulous tales full of forlorn love, religious imagery and wistful dreams. Many fell in love with Iron and Wine Beam's tender and spare rendering of The Postal Service's "Such Great Heights" was featured on the Garden State soundtrack in 2002. ... Read more in Amazon's Iron & Wine Store

Visit Amazon's Iron & Wine Store
for 19 albums, 8 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

The Sea & the Rhythm [VINYL] + Woman King + Our Endless Numbered Days
Price For All Three: £25.02

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Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (31 Aug. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sub Pop
  • ASIN: B000RGSOJ6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 217,447 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bookie on 15 Jan. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Sam Beam (Iron & Wine) recorded these beautiful, gentle, evocative songs informally at home. You couldn't wish for a better introduction to his work. You play this & just wish for more of the same. 'Jesus The Mexican Boy' is possibly one of the sweetest songs, very nostalgic, cinematic, and full of yearning, sorrow & regret. Imagine Kerouac at his most lyrical, sung gently, quietly & without any pretensions. Unbeatable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By review on 27 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The songs are perfect grown-up lullabies, the sound soft and gentle. The only problem is that there are barely any songs... which is okay if your cd player lets you play the same cd over again but otherwise its a bit expensive for only 5 songs x hope this helped x
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 26 reviews
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Where has Sam Beam been all my life? 14 Sept. 2004
By Portlander - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I listen to this EP like it's my job. I don't remember bedtime without it. It fits the mood, it spends time with you, it calms your frazzled nerves and lets you know that everything will be okay again. It is an essential in your collection of mellow music. It is what downtempo was meant to be. It is literate, wise, simple, and, most important in the sparse-music genre, it is complete.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
poetry in ocean 7 Nov. 2003
By Geoffrey S. Hineman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
As the springboard for the Seattle movement of the early `90s, Sup Pop Records has long been viewed as purveyors of all things lo-fi and hi-volume. Lately, however, they've been recruiting a roster of more diverse acts. Sam Beam, the one-man show known as Iron & Wine, is a brilliant example.
The Sea & the Rhythm is a five-song E.P. of songs that didn't fit on Beam's debut album The Creek Drank the Cradle. While these songs were recorded in Beam's own house, the sounds-in all their acoustic glory-share an overwhelming outdoor feeling. The guitar strumming, banjo picking, and mandolin lines decorating this disc would be right at home on the front porch, around the campfire, or on a breezy summer morning at the beach.
The real magic on this disc, however, comes from the mouth of Beam himself, both in terms of lyrics and delivery. His voice simply whispers, at times approaching a Neil Young quality, only better; and Beam's lyrics are pure magic. I've not heard more poetic lyrics from any artist in the last 15 years. If you're a listener who's more into words than the music, you've got a new reason to be happy.
"Jesus the Mexican Boy" is a standout track on the first listen. It tells the tale of unconditional friendship between a narrator and Jesus, the Mexican boy. They grow up together and their friendship holds true through the eloping of the narrator and Jesus' sister. For a listen, you can download the mp3 at subpop.com.
Although the whole disc clocks in at just 21:21, you'll want to listen to three times in a row each time you throw it in the player. It's just that good.
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
beautiful EP 24 Jun. 2004
By Dan Grissom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
First of all, I do not understand how some of the other reviewers could say that "Jesus, the Mexican boy" is a bad song. I guess it's just a taste thing, but I think it's one of the strongest on this EP. Sure it's not a song that's gonna "raise the roof" but that's not why I listen to Iron and Wine to begin with. The song is a beautiful poetic parable about his friendship with Jesus, the Mexican boy, and how he betrayed Jesus, but was forgiven. And as for the reviewer that called this album "JUNK," well, to be honest, that makes me sad. Sad that this person just doesn't get it.
Now that my temporary rant is over, I'll accually talk about the EP as a whole. When I bought this EP, I was hesitant at first, because it was only five songs, but I bought it anyway. That night I was up late framing some paintings and I just put it on loop and played it for about 5 hours. Now you'd think I'd get tired of the same five songs for five hours, but I didn't. Actually, I bought this before I had ever heard "The Creek Drank the Cradle," and I thought, "if this is what they left off of the first one, I've got to hear it." I was not disappointed at all, and haven't been by "Our Endless Numbered Days" either. I would recommend that anyone who is into layed back, beautiful, poetic, acoustic music buy all of Iron and Wine's albums. You will not be disappointed. However, if you are someone who absolutely adores what you hear on pop radio and on vh1, maybe you're not up to it. And for the record, I only gave it four stars because lately I've been saving my five stars for completely ground breaking, "change my life" sort of albums.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I'm lovin' it! 16 Oct. 2003
By "blindaphex" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
An EP well-worth shelling out for.
Is Sam Beam the new Nick Drake? These five songs are just as beautiful as the ones that made 'The Creek Drank The Cradle'. I love the quiet intensity of his voice, the perfect rhythm of the twin-tracked acoustic guitars and the truly unique ring of his lyrics.
If you liked his debut this one is definitely worth shelling out for. If you feel like digging into some soft, well written music then come get some.
j.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
"Someday the Waves Will Stop" 16 Feb. 2004
By Blackberries - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Length - 21:16
The brilliant Floridian Sam Beam, aka Iron and Wine, had displayed his lush, porchlight lullabies magnificently on Iron and Wine's debut, The Creek Drank the Cradle. The Sea and the Rhythm divagates through the same wayworn roads, but with an augmented sense of wistfulness and desolation. Another reviewer propounded that this EP will make listeners who are more concerned with lyrics very happy. The lyrics are, without a doubt, indelibly beautiful; but depreciating the music by sparing it a mention lucidly personifies ignorance. The delicate acoustics are as much a part of the poetry as the words themselves. Without the lilting glow of a banjo and a guitar, seemingly strummed by divine fingers, Jesus the Mexican Boy and Someday the Waves would be nothing more than average ballads. The Night Descending, for example, offers such pensive lines as "Met a man with missing fingers/Shaking hands with shaded strangers/Far too strong to pacify you/Ain't no telling what they're up to", but conflated with the hokey, O Brother Where Art Thou?-ish country jangle, a lackluster track is rendered. Thankfully that is the only number with parts not adding up to a cohesive whole (hence my rating of 4 stars, 4 exceptional pieces). The opening duo of songs that I've yet to mention are both very well done. The mysterious opener Beneath the Balcony foreshadows the dense lyrical tapestry that is woven in somber stitching through the course of the EP. The eponymously titled second number is a sultry love song in the purest sense..."Our hands they seek the end of afternoon/My hands believe and move over you". All in all, The Sea & the Rhythm airily transcends its earthly figures of 21 minutes and 9 dollars in a meek, self-effacing manner. Not monetarily, but soulfully, it shares a brief composition that will pull at your heartstrings and leave you wondering, how can a man come to create such music?
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